Francis Davison at The Redfern Gallery

What a great show this was!

I took many visual meanderings across the surfaces of the many collages on show.

As I plan to bring my own work onto a larger format, I found the size of the work on show very pleasing…Large enough to be easy to enter into, but not so large as to be impractical.  Though wall space nowadays is a problem for many people…Unless you have plenty of walls, what do you do with this superb, intimate yet impressive work?  Both bold and delicate, strong and fragile.  I like this.   But I lack the wall and floor I need to work at this scale at the present time.

Just one wall.  Just one floor.  And I will be happy.

I did resort to painting on the side of our house a few years back…

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reservedjenny meehan spontaneous side of the house painting

jenny meehan spontaneous side of the house painting © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

You cannot see this anymore because I have erected my studio tent in front of it.  It was painted with rollers and I called it “Spontaneous Side of the House Painting”.  It was indeed completely spontaneous, with no planning, just a sudden urge with a roller in hand and some left over silicate mineral paint!

But to today!

I am currently  experimenting with different materials to use in my own paintings.  I had started to introduce collaged elements a while ago, so it seems a natural progression to maybe use the process of sticking things on…

Indeed, with the need to work a bit larger, to have areas I can just stick on will be useful…

Especially as I plan to experiment with both planned and unplanned paintings.  It will be useful to be able to move large areas around if I need to.

And I like sticky things… Mmmm.

Brought rather a lot of tape recently.

Maybe something to do with wrapping up presents?  But not sure I need hazard tape to do that…?? Or non slip gripper tape, or double sided tape or…  Off on another meander…!

I would combine collage with paint I should think.  However, before that, loads of experimentation with surfaces needs to happen.

And what a pleasure that is!

Back to Francis Davison…

Looking around The Redfern Gallery at Francis Davison’s collages at the Private View was not enough for me, and besides, people, lovely as they are, get in the way!  So I re visited and took in a little bit more deeply what was happening there for me.  Seeing the work generated all kinds of new ideas in my mind, really, so many I needed to take notes.  The art now for me will be restraint…To hold back yet give all, at the very same time.

https://www.redfern-gallery.com/artists/47-francis-davison/

I also enjoyed the Jasper Johns exhibition at the Royal Academy.

Here is a quote from the Royal Academy website:

“One hopes for something resembling truth, some sense of life, even of grace, to flicker, at least, in the work.” Jasper Johns, 2006.

Widely known for his iconic images of flags, targets, numbers, maps and light bulbs, Jasper Johns has occupied a central position in American art since his first solo exhibition in New York in 1958. His treatment of iconography and appropriation of objects, symbols and words makes the familiar unfamiliar, achieving this through the distinctive, complex textures of his works. Through his ground-breaking paintings and sculptures, Johns established a decisive new direction in an art world that had previously been dominated by Abstract Expressionism.

Jasper Johns: ‘Something Resembling Truth’ is the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s work to be held in the UK in 40 years. Comprising over 150 paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints, it reveals the continuities and changes that have occurred over the past six decades and the curiosity and experimentation that Johns continues to apply to his current practice. During the 1960s Johns added an array of household and studio objects and imprints and casts of the human figure. The works of the 1970s are dominated by an abstract pattern, referred to as “crosshatchings”. During the 1980s and 1990s Johns introduced a variety of images that engaged with the ambiguities of perception and ongoing themes involving memory, sexuality, and the contemplation of mortality. From this time, Johns increasingly incorporated tracings and details of works by artists including Matthias Grünewald, Pablo Picasso and Edvard Munch. By the early 2000s Johns had embarked on the pared-down and more conceptual Catenary series which, along with other recent works such as 5 Postcards, 2013 and Regrets, 2013, shows the rich productivity and vitality of this late phase of his career.

The exhibition brings together artworks that rarely travel from international private and public collections and new works by the artist. It follows in the Royal Academy’s tradition of celebrating its Royal Academicians, continuing the strand of programming that has showcased some of the most significant living artists including Anish Kapoor, David Hockney, Anselm Kiefer and Ai Weiwei.

Working in close collaboration with the artist, the exhibition is co-curated by Dr Roberta Bernstein and Edith Devaney.

There were a few pieces which I liked, but lots I didn’t feel drawn to.  Not the same kind of experience as the Francis Davison exhibition for me, however I am still very glad I went.  I have a kind  friend who is a friend of the Royal Academy, and so I went with her and could get in free of charge.  Target, 1960 and Jasper Johns’ 1962 painting known as Fool’s House stood out for me, and I liked much of the monochrome paintings and prints.  I think I may experiment more with black and white myself, as it will enable me to focus on the mark making without the need to perform the balancing act of colour!

Here is a short video on Jasper Johns:

https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/article/jasper-johns-video-60-seconds

Christmas is coming!

If you want a religious, traditonal Advent Calendar, watch out, as they seem to be very expensive!

It seems you pay more for wanting the Nativity story depicted on your little cardboard feast of doors to open.  If you choose an advent calendar with nothing to do with Christ, it will be much cheaper!  This is sad.

I’m not keen on the run up to Christmas…It’s so dark, I don’t like all the emphasis on material goods, and I always feel I should be in hibernation.   I like Christmas Day itself, quite like Christmas Eve, love Boxing Day and I feel increasingly Christmassy AFTER Christmas!   As a committed Christian I do celebrate the coming of Christ into the world, and I do enjoy that part of things, naturally.  But the rest is burdensome.    Some glimmers of pleasure here and there, but not much!   However, I will wish all who read this a Happy Christmas, with all my heart, because I am not totally Humbug!   I hope you have got some pleasure from dipping into my ramblings and seeing some of my art working, which I am grateful to be able to share with you.

So “Happy Christmas!”

jenny meehan, jennifer meehan,all saints church angels project design angel abstraction holy holy holy image jenny meehan

all saints church angels project design angel abstraction holy holy holy image jenny meehan

And “Holy, Holy, Holy” is the most Christmassy piece of work I have done, so here it is as my Christmas Greeting to you!

 

Edward Muybridge

Kingston Museum are planning an exhibition of work via an open submission process.  It is sometime next year. As usual I have enjoyed taking many photographs of the work I am working on! That itself becomes a process of experimenting with composition.

 

 

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

 

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

 

I make a habit of examining my work in detail with the aid of a camera.  Something about a viewfinder helps me to look carefully!

I did a lot of reading around,  and in the end, couldn’t get away from the fact that the man was a murderer and if he wasn’t a man, he probably wouldn’t have got away with it!  I ended up feeling more a sense of tragedy for his wife and child.  There were all kinds of routes I could have gone down, including the interesting way in which it was fine for men to look at the female body for the purpose of art, (and supposedly science) but it was not OK for women to draw from life until years later. But in the end, it was the idea of playing around with what might be triggered in Edward Muybridge’s mind as he went about his work which I found fascinated me, hence “The Mind’s Eye”.

With this collaged painting comes the poem I wrote which is part of it:

The Mind’s Eye

What thoughts and memories
unsettled
might dwell in the unconscious mind of the artist
as he works?
Projected onto models…
Figures of his own past
laughing
moving
strangers
touching new pain in the mind’s eye?
Shot images…
they infiltrate the heart
yet, even the most animated
leave it
still
so solitary.

Jenny Meehan 2017

 

This work has been submitted but I don’t yet know if it will be accepted or not.  But whatever happens, I am sure the exhibition will be very good and I look forward to seeing it.  I don’t think I have dates for the exhibition, just that submissions need to be in by sometime in February next year!  But will keep you posted!

Positive Psychology

Back again to my interest in positive psychology.  Bit about it here, quoted from Wikipedia:

Seligman and Csikszentmihalyi define positive psychology as “the scientific study of positive human functioning and flourishing on multiple levels that include the biological, personal, relational, institutional, cultural, and global dimensions of life.”[8] L.M. Keyes and Shane Lopez illustrate the four typologies of mental health functioning: flourishing, struggling, floundering and languishing. However, complete mental health is a combination of high emotional well-being, high psychological well-being, and high social well-being, along with low mental illness.[9]

Very small snippet, but referencing for further reading.

I added this work to my Redbubble.com facility a while back.  It is another of the  “Signs of the Times” series.  I have revisited the work in the light of recent experiences of restricted mobility due to osteoarthritis/knee replacement surgery, the experience of physiotherapy, and working my way forward into increased mobility.  This theme of motion and mobility, and freedom of movement,  has been a theme for a while.  I sense some future work, both in the graphic/geometric and expressionistic/lyrical painting realms, may be ripening itself for release over the next year or so.  I have become quite passionate, as a result of my experience of pain and disability, to express the liberation I feel now I have freedom of movement.  I would like to use physical actions and movements in my painting more, and paint on a larger scale.

 

"Slow Motion We Get On" Digital Print by Jenny Meehan for sale to buy at Chessington Court Cafe and Garden Centre This ink-jet print is laminated and mounted on Foamex. It can be purchased with or without a frame. Bold, bright, geometric composition from British female fine and applied artist Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

“Slow Motion/We Get On” Digital Print by Jenny Meehan This ink-jet print is laminated and mounted on Foamex. It can be purchased with or without a frame. Bold, bright, geometric composition from British female fine and applied artist Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

 

Artist’s Description

Slow Motion/We Get On – Abstract Print Design by Jenny Meehan

Progress is sometimes slow in life, however, a positive attitude can take us a long way forwards. This contemporary abstract design is from the “Signs of the Times” series of art work. Inspired partly by my interest in Positive Psychology and also personal mobility challenges, this design is gently dynamic, with a sense of light inter-playing with darkness. Often we don’t see the “light at the end of the tunnel” but may be aware of nuances of light and dark through each day as it comes.

Jenny Meehan
jamartlondon.com

And the other one, which you saw above I donated to SWLEOC…. Here it is:

 

No Problem/Moving On abstract art print by Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com bright bold motivational art for physiotherapy experience personal mobility challenges, jenny meehan,

No Problem/Moving On sign of the times series jenny meehan

Artist’s Description

No Problem/Moving On – Geometric Colour Abstract Print by Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

One of the “Signs of the Times Series” by Jenny Meehan

This artwork design conveys a positive attitude, and is the fruit of my interest in positive psychology and personal mobility challenges. A “can do” attitude in the face of resistance and difficulties is the only way to move forward. The design has something of my own experience of exercising in a gym with motion suggested through various formal elements, of varying speeds and a sense of progression.

www.jamartlondon.com

 

Osteoarthritis –  The way it comes and runs off with your life

Well,  yes, it is all very positive, the psychology and the art.  But make no mistake, the time before my TKR (total knee replacement) was a very difficult time for me.  There was no doubt at all that the quality of my life diminished!    The worst thing for me was not being able to walk freely and the way it was affecting my painting and artistic practice. It was always  a challenge to balance different aspects of life, but it got even harder. Pain is very wearing.

I have very little pain now, and if I do (If I have really done a HUGE amount) it is very minor and no trouble at all.   In 2016 I found this, which I wrote before writing “The Very Patient Knee Replacement Story by Jenny Meehan”:

“Thoughts for potential artworks are jotted down with a Physiotherapy theme. “Being stretched to the Limit” is an attractive title.  Rather amazingly, the long awaited appointment with a surgeon is at eleven o’ clock in the morning.  Bearing in mind the phrase “the eleventh hour” this holds some  resonance.  For “the latest possible moment” is how it feels to me, even though the appointment has come quite quickly since I have been referred.  The last 16 months have been so restricting, frustrating, and basically disabling.  It’s been a long journey…not over yet. I will probably need to write about it here in the future, particularly in relation to my thoughts about age and access to knee replacement.”

How funny, and little did I know I would get so carried away with writing!

I think I need to write a booklet or some other kind of more concise text about knee replacement next!

Life is just great now though!  Movement and rhythm seem to be two of my most favourite things!  I had a fantastic time at “Drum Dance” which was organised by Kingston Arts in November.  I have even brought myself a little Bongo drum.  Small and cheap but OK for me.  I had such a brilliant time, dancing around for hours on my new knee, I couldn’t quite believe it.  And drumming away!  The best time I have had in ages.  And the next day, no soreness, pain, or any problems with my knee.

I am seriously thinking about incorporating movement into these bigger paintings I plan to do next year.  I need more room!  I need more space!

Dadirri

I found this interesting.  Always very into water.  Just excerpts of it:

Dadirri – A Reflection By Miriam – Rose Ungunmerr- Baumann
NGANGIKURUNGKURR means ‘Deep Water Sounds’. Ngangikurungkurr is the name of
my tribe. The word can be broken up into three parts: Ngangi means word or sound, Kuri
means water, and kurr means deep. So the name of my people means ‘the Deep Water
Sounds’ or ‘Sounds of the Deep’. This talk is about tapping into that deep spring that is
within us.”

“…this quality is called dadirri. It is inner, deep listening and quiet, still awareness.
Dadirri recognises the deep spring that is inside us. We call on it and it calls to us. This
is the gift that Australia is thirsting for. It is something like what you call “contemplation”.
When I experience dadirri, I am made whole again. I can sit on the riverbank or walk
through the trees; even if someone close to me has passed away, I can find my peace in
this silent awareness. There is no need of words. A big part of dadirri is listening.”

There is no need to reflect too much and to do a lot of thinking. It is just being aware.
My people are not threatened by silence. They are completely at home in it. They have
lived for thousands of years with Nature’s quietness. My people today, recognise and
experience in this quietness, the great Life-Giving Spirit, the Father of us all. It is easy for
me to experience God’s presence. When I am out hunting, when I am in the bush,
among the trees, on a hill or by a billabong; these are the times when I can simply be in
God’s presence. My people have been so aware of Nature. It is natural that we will feel
close to the Creator.”

She talks also about waiting and how the Aboriginal culture has “taught us to be still and wait”.

We don’t like to hurry. There is nothing more important than what we are attending to.
There is nothing more urgent that we must hurry away for.
We wait on God, too. His time is the right time. We wait for him to make his Word clear
to us. We don’t worry. We know that in time and in the spirit of dadirri (that deep listening
and quiet stillness) his way will be clear.
We are River people. We cannot hurry the river. We have to move with its current and
understand its ways.”

 

Yes, we cannot hurry the river!

Imagined Worlds Exhibition Images

This was an exhibition I took part in towards the end of 2016 and beginning of this year. It was a super project, brilliantly organised and I was very pleased to be part of it!

Here are some images from the “Imagined Worlds” Exhibition curated by Jon England in collaboration with Somerset Art Works.  All Photos: Jon England.

Imagined Worlds – A touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1816. This is a celebration by the Friends of Coleridge supported by Somerset Art Works, working in partnership with the National Trust, CICCIC Taunton, and Art at the Heart, RUH Bath.

My work shown in the third image… Close up reminder:  Title:  Alph, the Sacred River 1

imagined worlds coleridge kubla khan inspired art exhibition somerset imagined worlds exhibition alph the sacred river coleridge kubla khan jenny meehan

imagined worlds exhibition alph the sacred river coleridge kubla khan jenny meehan

And we must have the poem, of course….

Kubla Khan
BY SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE
Or, a vision in a dream. A Fragment.
In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree:
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea.
So twice five miles of fertile ground
With walls and towers were girdled round;
And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.

But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted
Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover!
A savage place! as holy and enchanted
As e’er beneath a waning moon was haunted
By woman wailing for her demon-lover!
And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething,
As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing,
A mighty fountain momently was forced:
Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst
Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail,
Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher’s flail:
And mid these dancing rocks at once and ever
It flung up momently the sacred river.
Five miles meandering with a mazy motion
Through wood and dale the sacred river ran,
Then reached the caverns measureless to man,
And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean;
And ’mid this tumult Kubla heard from far
Ancestral voices prophesying war!
The shadow of the dome of pleasure
Floated midway on the waves;
Where was heard the mingled measure
From the fountain and the caves.
It was a miracle of rare device,
A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice!

A damsel with a dulcimer
In a vision once I saw:
It was an Abyssinian maid
And on her dulcimer she played,
Singing of Mount Abora.
Could I revive within me
Her symphony and song,
To such a deep delight ’twould win me,
That with music loud and long,
I would build that dome in air,
That sunny dome! those caves of ice!
And all who heard should see them there,
And all should cry, Beware! Beware!
His flashing eyes, his floating hair!
Weave a circle round him thrice,
And close your eyes with holy dread
For he on honey-dew hath fed,
And drunk the milk of Paradise.

 

 

Interesting Book: Art and Psychoanalysis by Maria Walsh

Often derided as unscientific and self-indulgent, psychoanalysis has been an invaluable resource for artists, art critics and historians throughout the twentieth century. Art and Psychoanalysis investigates these encounters. The shared relationship to the unconscious, severed from Romantic inspiration by Freud, is traced from the Surrealist engagement with psychoanalytic imagery to the contemporary critic’s use of psychoanalytic concepts as tools to understand how meaning operates. Following the theme of the ‘object’ with its varying materiality, Walsh develops her argument that psychoanalysis, like art, is a cultural discourse about the mind in which the authority of discourse itself can be undermined, provoking ambiguity and uncertainty and destabilising identity. The dynamics of the dream-work, Freud’s ‘familiar unfamiliar’, fetishism, visual mastery, abjection, repetition, and the death drive are explored through detailed analysis of artists ranging from Max Ernst to Louise Bourgeois, including 1980s postmodernists such as Cindy Sherman, the performance art of Marina Abramovic’ and post-minimalist sculpture.

Innovative and disturbing, Art and Psychoanalysis investigates key psychoanalytic concepts to reveal a dynamic relationship between art and psychoanalysis which goes far beyond interpretation. There is no cure for the artist – but art can reconcile us to the traumatic nature of human experience, converting the sadistic impulses of the ego towards domination and war into a masochistic ethics of responsibility and desire.”

I will need to put this on my reading list..  Maybe on my Christmas list!

“understand how meaning operates” 

” psychoanalysis, like art, is a cultural discourse about the mind in which the authority of discourse itself can be undermined, provoking ambiguity and uncertainty and destabilising identity.”… interesting…

There is no cure for the artist – but art can reconcile us to the traumatic nature of human experience, converting the sadistic impulses of the ego towards domination and war into a masochistic ethics of responsibility and desire.”

Mmm, interesting with respect to the sadistic impulses of the ego…  Not so sure on the ethics of responsibility and desire, as don’t quite get why linked with masochistic….   But then, have not read the book yet.  

Introduction
Chapter 1 | Distortion and Disguise: The Dream-Work
Chapter 2 | Uncanny Eruptions
Chapter 3 | Refashioning Fetishism and Masquerade
Chapter 4 | Female Fetishism in the Expanded Field of Narcissism
Chapter 5 | Eye and Gaze: Restoring Body to Vision
Chapter 6 | The Evolution of Abjection
Chapter 7 | Black Narcissus
Chapter 8 | Repetition and the Death Drive
Chapter 9 | Returning to Melanie Klein
Chapter 10 | ‘Real-Making’: A Transitional Phenomenon
Chapter 11 | New Skins for Old
Select Bibliography
Index

Text above is quoted from: http://www.ibtauris.com/Books/The%20arts/The%20arts%20general%20issues/Theory%20of%20art/Art%20and%20Psychoanalysis.aspx?menuitem=%7BE0961D02-3441-46BB-AC01-8728897BEF72%7D

Maria Walsh is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art, Theory at University of the Arts, London.

As well as all this brain stretching stuff… I am very much interested in interpretation…Someone’s personal interpretation matters just as much as any academic theory or analysis.  But it is good to keep my mind working!

 

Mindful Eating

I lost a lot of weight in the last couple of years.  Still working on it though!  I found mindful eating helpful.

Information quoted below is from this website:  https://zenhabits.net/what-is-mindful-eating/

Simply put, my approach to mindful eating is learning to pay attention. Instead of eating mindlessly, putting food into your mouth almost unconsciously, not really tasting the food you’re eating … you notice your thoughts, feelings, and sensations.

You learn to pay attention to:

Why you feel like eating, and what emotions or needs might be triggering the eating.
What you’re eating, and whether it is healthy or not.
The look, smell, taste, feel of the food you’re eating.
How it makes you feel as you taste it, as you digest it, and throughout the day.
How full (or sated) you are before, during and after eating.
Your emotions during and after eating.
Where the food came from, who might have grown it, how much it might have suffered before it was killed, whether it was grown organically, how much it was processed, how much it was fried or overcooked, etc.

This is a skill, a form of meditation really, that you don’t just acquire overnight. It takes practice, and there will be times when you forget to eat mindfully, and there will be starts and stops. But with practice and attention, you can become very good at this.” 

 

“The Benefits of Mindful Eating
The benefits of eating mindfully are amazing, and it’s important to know these benefits as you consider the practice.

I’m going to go over just a handful of the most important benefits, though as you learn the practice I’m sure you’ll find many more. Many of these are from personal experience, but many of them are supported by research (I’ve linked to some of the research when I had the link handy).

My favorite benefits:

You learn to eat when you’re hungry, and stop when you’re sated.
You learn to really taste food, and to enjoy the taste of healthy food.
You slowly start to realize that unhealthy food isn’t as tasty as you thought, nor does it make you feel very good.
As a result of the above three points, you will often lose weight if you’re overweight.
You begin to sort through the emotional issues you have around food and eating. This takes a bit longer, but it’s important.
Social overeating can become less of a problem — you can eat mindfully while socializing, with practice, and not overeat.
You begin to enjoy the eating experience more, and as a result enjoy life more, when you’re more present.
It can become a mindfulness ritual you look forward to.
You learn how food affects your mood and energy throughout the day.
You learn what food best fuels your exercise and work and play.
Again, there are other benefits, but these are some of the most important, in my experience. “

I am rather rushing around at the moment, as I can now do so.  It seems I have a burst of energy I haven’t had for years and I think that now I am mobile and pain free, I am intent on making the most of what I have while I have it.  I don’t think I will ever take walking for granted again!

This looks interesting, on another tangent:

http://www.everypainterpaintshimself.com/about

Contact Jenny Meehan through the contact form on her website:

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742

About Jenny Meehan (Jennifer Meehan) 

Jenny Meehan is an established artist who has been exhibiting for over ten years, mostly in the UK. Notable exhibitions include, most recently being selected for the Imagined Worlds touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ and inclusion in “Building Bridges, the Female Perspective” at Tower Bridge Victorian Engine Rooms in 2016. Jenny has been a keen supporter of various charity art exhibitions over the years including the National Brain Appeals ” A Letter in Mind” at Gallery@oxo, South Bank, London and the “Anatomy for Life” Exhibition for Brighton Sussex University Hospitals Trust in 2015

Selected by a wide range of judges in open submission exhibitions, her work appeals to the aesthetic and emotional discernment of many, and has been displayed in many prestigious galleries. These include the Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, in 2015, as part of their Open Exhibition, and the Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, West Sussex, as part of the Pallant House Gallery/St Wilfrid’s Hospice Open Art Exhibition in 2010.

Jenny Meehan’s work has been included in several academic projects and and publications including “Speaking Out – Women Recovering from the Trauma of Violence” by Nicole Fayard in 2014 and the ongoing “Recovery” Exhibition project – Institute Of Mental Health/City Arts, Nottingham University, also in 2014. While her romantic, lyrical, expressionistic, abstract paintings offer a contemplative space free from cares and concerns, other strands of her practice engage with subjects ranging from violence, trauma recovery, psychoanalysis, and mental health.

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