first day morning abstract art image licensable ©jenny meehan, circles, moon, sun,light,day,digital collage,emotive,spiritual art,geometric abstraction

jenny meehan art prints abstract digital collage First Day; Morning abstract art image licensable ©jenny meehan all rights reserved

First Day; Morning

Above:  First Day; Morning. Archival Quality Digital Print….

I’m just sorting out some digital prints ready for this years Kingston Artists’ Open Studios…And “First Day; Morning” is one of them.  I’ve become fascinated with the circle as a geometric shape and am using it increasingly in my art working.  Yet my ongoing interest in texture and surface persist.

In the run up to the Open Studios  most of my focus is on organisation at the moment, as well as reviewing work and deciding what to show.  It’s a busy time, but rewarding.  There’s the odd conflict between selecting work that I hope might sell and selecting work which I personally want to spent a couple of weekends looking at!  I do need to sell artwork…Money is needed.  And space is needed!  The great thing about being so productive, is I have a lot of choice in what I decide to show.  There’s only a tiny fraction of my work on the internet, and my archives are huge.  But with work which is actually printed or painted… It does take up space.  And space is limited!

I’m in the mood for writing now, so I’m going for it!  I’d like to write more in the future…More project based and focused…but for now the “meandering discourse” serves me best for it’s function, which isn’t  particularly focused (in an “overview” kind of way…with editing and honing and shaping, and all of that): It never was meant to be something which stood on it’s own two feet.  Rather a brook through my mind and thinking; sometimes feeling… meeting artwork here and there. Not showing in a conclusive way.  But something useful for me to look back on.  Indeed, I do.  And it serves it’s purpose. Works as a kind of gauge at times. Shows movement in other areas, even though it moves itself. Leaves an indentation, which is easier to see when looking backwards.

 

first day morning abstract art image licensable ©jenny meehan, circles, moon, sun,light,day,digital collage,emotive,spiritual art,geometric abstraction

jenny meehan art prints abstract digital collage ©jenny meehan all rights reserved  First Day; Evening

“First Day; Morning” and “First Day Evening” will be available for sale at this year’s Kingston Artists’ Open Studios!

 

Sean Scully

I enjoyed the recent programme on Sean Scully. Interesting quote:

He admits to being a bit surprised that his stature has not just endured but grown exponentially. “I think it’s a question of the way the cultural ocean moves,” he explains. “Painting has made a huge comeback. There’s a whole generation of curators out there who are young, but they’re sick and tired of conceptual art, they’re interested in things that are actually made. So all over, in South America, in China, there’s a return to a world of emotional materiality in painting. In a way I was waiting for this to happen for a long time, but no longer.”

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.irishtimes.com/culture/art-and-design/visual-art/artist-sean-scully-it-s-about-stacking-putting-things-in-order-1.3642099%3fmode=amp
Sat, Sep 29, 2018, 05:00. Article written by Aiden Dunne

Read the whole article.

http://seanscullystudio.com/

He certainly has plenty of room (and studios in the plural!) to paint in!

“A mysterious embodiment, it remains silent, yet potentially potent, whilst never entirely giving up its mystery.”  On painting, from Metaphor

On abstract painting and music….Kevin Power / Sean Scully October 2, 2002
(Questions to Sean Scully on the occasion of Encuentro, Mudial de Las Artes,
Valencia October 3-6 2002)

It is sometimes said that all art aspires to the condition of
music. I would like my art to aspire to something like the condition of music:
but a condition that can be felt and experienced in a deep moment. I think
with painting you can get rid of the problem of time. You can feel it abstracted
in the rhythms, in the layers of the painting; but you are, for your moment,
free.
I do believe abstraction is and was meant to embody deep emotion. I believe
that’s its job, in the history of art. The edges of the character and forms in my
paintings should lie against and with each other, with complexity and
emotional depth. Naturally one feels time in my work, because it is layered. It
is repainted many times, in different colors and weights of paint, always by
me: until somehow everything lives, however gracefully or awkwardly, in its
right place. So it’s a façade, but it’s a façade that submits to feeling or is
overwhelmed by it: since nothing is perfect.”

This is something I wish I heard more often:

You have talked about yourself as a ‘romantic realist”, a stance that given our
present circumstances is not easy to sustain both on account of the geo political changes
taking place in the world and because numerous philosophers seem to be questioning the
gains of our Western humanist tradition to which such an attitude clearly belongs. How
do you see the real as now penetrating the romantic frame through which you “feel” the
world?
This is a very big question, a question about which one could write a book. I
am very aware that the romantic is now seen to be of limited relevance.
However, I have attempted to articulate my idealistic sense of romanticism in
the world, as it is, with its problems now. Without giving up on my true
personal feeling. To say it simply, I think it’s not only possible, but important to
offer a deeply felt example of a humanistic art form: in a world that has
become extremely cynical. I have lived through many changes, social and
political, that have affected me and changed me. However, my art is trying to
address something eternal and universal. So however difficult it may be for
someone with my sense of connection (connectedness) to continue to offer
an idealistic/humanistic view, I have to keep doing it. In fact, the worse it gets,
the more crucial it is to offer it.
I hope my work can stand as an example of another possibility. I realized,
when I moved out of the political arena in my radical days, that I would
experience as an artist moments of guilt and impotence.”

Here’s a bit about the programme I watched:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/proginfo/2019/15/unstoppable-sean-scully

You can watch it here:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m00041pb/unstoppable-sean-scully-and-the-art-of-everything

Signs of the Times… Continues!

One of the great things about art working is the way that things develop over time.  I think it may be the best!  I love the way I get new perspectives on things I have done often several years ago.  The “Signs of the Times” strand of experimentation started a few years back, but set me off on a useful path into working with flat surfaces and geometric elements…A welcome change from the lyrical abstraction.  (It’s easily possible to become over saturated with one aspect of your work).  Contrasts and changes, trying new mediums, and keeping an open mind are essential in artistic creation.  Concepts are all well and good, but the tree of ideas grows from the art working, in my opinion.  Life and its experiences enter the life of the artist and strange things happen there!  Well, this is the approach which works for me.  There are many others. It can work in other ways too.  I find the openness and flow essential though, in my own creativity.  Openness and flow involve a fair amount of trust, risk, and uncertainty.   We get to know our materials well.   We need to also get to know ourselves well.  Because what we do comes from deep within us.  It cannot come from anywhere else in the end.  And life changes.  It changes us.  And the work of any artist evolves along with everything else.

 

geometric abstract colour design art jenny meehan jamartlondon british contemporary femaile artist symbolist graphic colourist contemporary abstraction experimental jenny meehan art for sale to buy prints affordable, jenny meehan abstract art print

The night time version, maybe calm moment in the dark, partner of calm moment in the light! © Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved

 

 

Above is one example of my series “Signs of the Times”: Geometric abstraction experiments carried out using vector graphics software. It was a delight to try communicating simple phrases and emotions visually in an abstract form, making simple yet emblematic pieces of affordable art. Affordable because the artwork is printed via Redbubble.com, which is a print on demand site.  Yes, it may not be very “fine arty” in the exclusive sense, but it’s no less fine art because it is accessible.  I have grown tired of the whole idea of value and art.  What I mean is, the connection (which is sometimes made…not by all) that if something is very expensive and out of reach it is somehow more well, “art”.  The reality is that sites like Redbubble.com make the work of artists very accessible.

When people buy products on Redbubble.com, for example, they may be buying a mass produced item, BUT, and it’s a big BUT…The design and the artwork on the items is far from mass produced.  It may be very available on Redbubble.com, BUT that doesn’t mean that lots and lots of it is going to be sold.  Far from it…Thankfully the world is FULL of marvellous artists.  So full, in fact, that most of us only occasionally sell now and again.  So the items which people buy on Redbubble.com could quite easily be “one-offs”.  Yes, there is no limiting of editions, (the traditional way of restricting prints executed in the traditional manner) but if someone is looking for a piece of art by an artist, they could consider buying something through a print-on-demand site.  They may well be getting a totally unique object which ends up being a “one-off”, even though it is not marketed as such.

https://www.redbubble.com/shop/jenny+meehan+art-prints

The only thing it will not have, of course is a signature!  And there is that point which the item will have never been actually touched by the artist…But that is the object itself.  Art is not just about the production of objects and artefacts. “Common place” ones or “exclusive” ones…It makes no difference does it?   The appearance of one of my own artworks through the avenue of Redbubble.com is a choice I have made most purposefully. It reflects my feelings and values.  It’s part of how I operate, and not just for practical reasons.  There are practical reasons.  And I carefully selected Redbubble.com because of the quality of the products.  They met my own requirements for forms that my artwork might be re-presented through.  Yes, I will also have my paintings, and sometimes sell those, from time to time.   And some numbered (but not limited edition) prints.  But I have no time or desire to do things which distract me from my main focus of innovation, creation, experimentation, and development.

https://www.redbubble.com/shop/jenny+meehan+art-prints

 

Digital printing is a whole new world!

Part of my thinking in this kind of direction also leads me to an interest in using substrates which are generally utilised in distinctly “non-fine art” realms.  Banners and advertising boards.  Company promotional material product materials and equipment. Printing is now so wonderful! So much is possible which was not possible before! We see such much printed matter all around us. So many interesting surfaces and substrates.  Do I feel that I somehow debase my art work by presenting it on materials used for advertising? Not one little bit.  Why should I?  This is the matter we meet in our daily life and it should be the material of fine art too.  Why not?  It’s a most definite form, and we associate it with one type of activity but that doesn’t mean it cannot be associated with another.  The longevity possible now, and the quality of printing and inks has come such a long way. It’s amazing!  Exciting!  Fantastic!  If I had more money available to spend, I would be printing my work on many more substrates than I use at present…if it suited the realisation aptly!

Maybe there is a kind of redemption going on for me in this desire?  For our desires are so much influenced by what is around us.

“A successful advertising message transcends the audience perceptions of needs and wants. It creates an emotional appeal that subtly convinces the audience that the item being promoted will make a difference in their lives by either making them happy, giving them status, satisfying a desire or providing security.”

I like an emotional appeal to a viewer to come from the imagery I create. But because it is what it is. And it can be to them how they wish it to be.  It’s always good when someone connects and it’s helpful to me if they decide they want to buy something. (Why not?) But to replace advertising with my own imagery and take over the territory, even in just a very small way…As a gesture maybe?  It feels good to do this.  Maybe I have moved myself from the position of passive object of the advertising to the active subject in some sense? I won’t be told what I desire…(I am sure I often am! Not advertising proof!)  I will put my expression, the product of my own desire to create, on substrates/objects/forms associated in our minds with advertising.

It’s nothing new.  But I need to think it through, so I am doing so.

On a slightly different, but allied tack…

There are various billboard art projects going on/which have happened.  The materials and context are often used to great advantage.  There are many themes developed by billboard artists, yet the majority address social issues.  There’s a kind of takeover bid…using that advertising space (and so the same media). A kind of graffiti form, with just a bit more of an element of disguise maybe?! Billboard artist use many strategies, including appropriating well known ads to alter meanings, making objects which look and function like adverts, and graffiti over advertisement boards.

There’s often text and a clear concept, rather than something which is abstract expressionist though.  I like my work to be in the public realm, but it doesn’t have to have the kind of extent of publication that something with a message would be targeted at.  (Though wouldn’t the world look lovely if all the adverts were removed?  I think we would probably feel all a lot better to be honest.)

So much public space is dominated by the media, corporate culture and advertising.

I’m very fond of the Guerrilla Girls work! (Guerrilla Girls is an anonymous group of feminist, female artists devoted to fighting sexism and racism within the art world. The group formed in New York City in 1985 with the mission of bringing gender and racial inequality into focus within the greater arts community. The group employs culture jamming in the form of posters, books, billboards, and public appearances to expose discrimination and corruption. (wording from Tate website)

Mmm.

I do remember there being some project I came across years back which put artist’s work up on posters on the tube.  Trouble was it did cost quite a lot of money to do so.  Nice way to share your work if you can though.  I remember coming across some and very much enjoying the fact that I wasn’t being exposed to an advert.  Simply a piece of work with a name, which I could look into if I wanted to, but could just enjoy it’s presence in front of my eyes.

 

And look at this… What an interesting read!  Coming from a slightly different angle…Very interesting on “special status”.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110823130029.htm

Fine art in advertising can backfire
Date:
August 23, 2011
Source:
Boston College
Summary:
Fine art has been used for centuries to sell goods and ideas, but a new study finds artwork can lose its special status with consumers if it’s improperly used for product illustration.

“The researchers suggest the responses reflect how humans have evolved to recognize and appreciate art as a special category of expression.

“People have evolved to care about art,” said Hagtvedt. “It is something we have appreciated in all societies known to man, throughout history and pre-history. It is also a magnificent tool for marketers who rely on its communicative power in a thoughtful and honest manner, but those who use it thoughtlessly are not likely to impress anyone.””

Ah!  So that’s one way which “fine art” might be utilized, from one direction.  Many very successful artists are happy to have their art work used in this way, and often they are very well known ones.  While others, far less well known and defensive of the “value” of their work (even though it generates little in the cash sense) may feel horror at the very thought.

It is the sense of being set apart from the objectives of advertising…This is important.

Does my practice of sometimes choosing to manifest my fine art practice on a PVC banner, or in a material form commonly used for advertising change it’s nature at all? No!  Why should it? If I think something looks right printed on something commonly used for marketing material, then might I fear it somehow less fine art because of the substrate or the intended purpose of the item when it was manufactured? No, of course not. I can print what I want where ever I want.  If it serves the vision and works aesthetically.  If the conceptual aspect materialises in line with my intention, then I could print on your bottom and that would be just fine.  (Well, maybe not. With consent! I’m sure it’s been done before anyway!).

So the movement of some expressions of my work, which is indeed part of a “fine art” practice, onto objects which are part of everyday life, is a lovely thing, and something I need not ever steer myself away from.  Indeed, for many years, I have used table clothes with my digital imagery on them (dye-sublimation printed) in my domestic sphere…There’s been no need for a separation of myself from my art working/results of my art working materialised  in every day life.  It’s been a necessary combination!  I live in an art gallery!  It’s called my home.  The relative status of such a situation is one thing. Just one thing. Nothing more.

That my home is also my workplace is both great and challenging.  It doesn’t offer me the same sense of status (it appears) as someone who works in a separate place, but to be fair, I think that may be partly just an ignorance thing… People don’t recognise what happens in homes as work in the same way they do when activities take place in other buildings. And many people don’t see art working as work.  Or indeed, don’t see anything as “work” unless it involves the generation of finances. (However, I have a vague memory that I have probably rambled on about that in some earlier post!)

When writing this artist’s journal, repetition is the name of the game.  I’m a stuck record on some things!

I may be digressing a little.

The main thing is that it’s my prerogative to use whatever materials I want, regardless of how they may be normally perceived or used in our culture/society.  If, for whatever varied reasons, the appearance of something generated by me on an object of lowly status, be it via Redbubble.com or on an advertising banner, cushion cover, whatever, seems less in value because of it’s form, then so be it.  I think maybe just to be aware that artists make very careful choices about what they do, and why: this may help understanding a little. It’s all part of the same thing in the end.  What we do.  It’s an expression of us. Whoever we are and whatever we do. We all measure up things all the time.  Cannot help doing so. But in no way, not one bit, is doing what I do in the way that I do it any kind of indication that I am valuing my artwork any less than someone who only sells to Kings and Queens for large amounts of money.  The whole value thing is an illusion.  I kind of enjoy breaking through it a little bit. That’s all.

And redemption. Buying back the territory a little bit.  I have become so tired of all this advertising so much in my face all the time.  Isn’t it tiresome?  Isn’t it relentless?  Persistent!  It’s a pest!

 

Remember! When people buy products on Redbubble.com, for example, they may be buying a mass produced piece of merchandise, BUT, and it’s a big BUT…The design and the artwork on the items is far from mass produced. The art working itself is original and unique.   It may be very available to everyone because it’s on Redbubble.com, (GOOD!) BUT that doesn’t mean that lots will be sold. There IS potential for something to become commonplace; No limited edition, HOWEVER in practice very few items will be sold which utilize the work of the individual artists in any large numbers.  WHY? Thankfully the world is full of brilliant artists selling on Redbubble.com. I’m saying this because I think folk don’t think things through.

If you are an art collector and want to collect artists work, then please don’t shun any options you have to get the artwork which you want.  It’s great to have an original piece of art, but also good to have examples of the artists you collect, across many of the mediums they use.  Nowadays print is a medium which cannot be ignored and there are many artists who see through the “value” goldfish bowl and the marketing strategies which often get used by art dealers, etc and which dictate more than they should what art collectors feel is worth collecting.  Realise the artificial constructs which are in operation. If you collect art, collect it because you love collecting the art you love to collect, and collect it in all forms, regardless of status or perceived value.  The value is what it says to you and means to you. 

 

London Downpour – Lyrically Abstract Painting – Jenny Meehan

We are a little past March and April now, but as I have been working on some editing of past writing “Some Kind of Narrative” my mind has taken me right back to the passage in my life, in 2012, when I started working with a therapist and started along the long road of recovery from much too much trauma!  Trauma in early life, I discovered, has a habit of sticking with you, even when you would like to leave it behind. I continue in therapy.  But looking back, I can appreciate all the work I have done, and I am reaping the rewards of it too.

And so my recollections dug up this painting for me.  It was painted during 2012.  I went into London twice a week for psychotherapy then.  I met my therapist at the Guild of Psychotherapists,  Nelson Square, which is not far from the South bank. I would very frequently walk along the river side and often in a state of numbness emotionally.  It was exhausting at times.  It was nice to sit down and gaze at the water.

And during 2012 there was plenty of water to gaze at, and coming from all directions!

The 2012 Great Britain and Ireland floods are a series of weather events that affected parts of Great Britain and Ireland periodically during the course of 2012 and on through the winter into 2013. The beginning of 2012 saw much of the United Kingdom experiencing droughts and a heat wave in March. A series of low pressure systems steered by the jet stream brought the wettest April in 100 years, and flooding across Britain and Ireland. Continuing through May and leading to the wettest beginning to June in 150 years, with flooding and extreme events occurring periodically throughout Britain and parts of Atlantic Europe.”

The wettest April in 100 years!

The painting “London Downpour” was painted over several months.  I always paint in a piecemeal fashion. Very rarely do I paint from start to finish.  The painting was exhibited at The Strand Gallery in June 2013 and was brought by a collector, Roger Lewis.  I was very glad of this.  Not only for myself and him (for it’s always happy when a person finds a painting they love) but for the charity to which I donated a portion of the price, as part of the arrangement, (as suggested by the exhibition organisers).  The painting is a good example of some of the main elements I was experimenting with at the time.

London Downpour- Jenny Meehan painting abstraction at The Strand Gallery London as part of "Lines" visual art exhibition, jenny meehan jamartlondon london downpour process led painting british contemporary female abstract expressionistic painting, claude venard style work of london southbank tate modern river thames,contemporary emerging artist exhibition london.

London Downpour- Jenny Meehan painting abstraction at The Strand Gallery London as part of “Lines” visual art exhibition. Lyrical and geometric abstraction painting southbank london from the imagination! painted in a process-led, intuitive guided fashion, external impressions from regular trips to London appear to have seeped into my subconscious!

 

London Down Pour process led painting contemporary female painter Jenny Meehan southwark southbank memory based abstraction lyrical solid liquid dialectic,contemporary london south west based visual artist woman painter

Floating…. Yes, this is a strand I continued with.  Solids and liquids… yes, another.  Water… yes, that too.  Formal elements…experimenting with paint continued and developed; textural elements becoming even more important and refined over time.

Mostly resonating with those walks along the Thames; past Tate Modern.  Which looks quite different now!  The sooty feeling of London.  Always felt it on your skin.  A contrast of buildings and water.

The paint is acrylic, but I see carefully balanced with earths… So important, because otherwise acrylic paint can be far too loud for a restful painting.

artist talk school london downpour, jenny meehan artist talk at st joachim's catholic primary school 2014

jenny meehan artist talk at st joachim’s catholic primary school 2014 on painting techniques used in london downpour painting

I later gave a talk at a primary school and shared a little about how the painting was created.  Funny being in a classroom again.  I used to be a primary school teacher. I have lost quite a lot of weight since then!

 

Ah, wow! What a great read!

Anton Vidokle
Art without Market, Art without Education: Political Economy of Art

https://www.e-flux.com/journal/43/60205/art-without-market-art-without-education-political-economy-of-art/

 

Read it all… Here’s a little taster! (E-flux Journal #43 – Anton Vidokle – Art without Market, Art without Education: Political Economy of Art)

“But since his time, Warhol’s economic independence seems to have been misunderstood. The independence that came from his bridging of the bohemian sphere and the sphere of day-to-day commerce has been converted into a vast proliferation of so-called artistic practices that treat art as a profession. But art is not a profession. What does being professional actually mean under the current conditions of de-skilling in art? We should probably be less concerned with being full-time, art-school-trained, professional artists, writers, or curators—less concerned with measuring our artistic worth in these ways. Since most of us are not expected to perfect any specific techniques or master any craft—unlike athletes or classical musicians, for example—and given that we are no longer tied to working in specific mediums, perhaps it’s fine to be a part-time artist? After all, what is the expertise of a contemporary artist? Perhaps a certain type of passionate hobbyism, a committed amateurism, is okay: after all, we still live in a reality largely shaped by talented amateurs of the nineteenth century, like Thomas Edison and so many others. I think it’s perfectly acceptable to work in some other capacity in the arts, or in an entirely different field, and also to make art: sometimes this situation actually produces much more significant work than the “professional art” we see at art fairs and biennials. Ilya Kabakov supported himself for decades by being a children’s book illustrator. Marcel Duchamp worked as a librarian and later sold Brancusi’s work to make a living, while refusing to be dependent on sales of his own work.”

Quote from https://www.e-flux.com/journal/43/60205/art-without-market-art-without-education-political-economy-of-art/

Anton Vidokle is an editor of e-flux journal.

© 2013 e-flux and the author

 

Kingston Artist’s Open Studios 2019 in June!

 

Kingston upon Thames in Surrey has a lovely hub of artists and each year we show our work, dotted around different venues in Kingston Upon Thames.

Open Studios in Kingston is a collaborative public exhibition whereby local artists and makers open their own homes or studios to the public and exhibit their work.

The Open Studio venues are organised into art trails in and around Kingston, featuring a wide range of 2D and 3D work – painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, glass, photography, digital art, textiles, paper art and mixed media.

This is a perfect opportunity to meet local creators, see their work, talk to them about their techniques and inspirations and buy affordable art direct from the artist.

 

British Lyrical Abstract Paintings:  See http://www.jamartlondon.com/

2019 Open Studios in Kingston will be taking place on 8/9th and 15/16th June
from 11am to 5pm each day.

If you would like up to date information when it comes out, contact me via my website information form and I will send it to you asap! 

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742

I plan to display a selection of recent work, both original paintings and prints. The price range of my original work is £80 to £600.  Most of my original fine art sells for around the £200/£300 mark, making it an affordable buy for any art collector.  I also offer a selection of prints for purchase for under £100.

 

There is a super video which was made last year which gives you an idea of what Kingston Artist’s Open Studios is all about!

 

Do come along!

 

“If funders truly believe in the humanistic value of the arts, they must not compel artists to merely adopt the practices of for-profit entrepreneurs. They must advocate for the value in what artists already do: bringing the artistic imagination more fully into everyday life and making creative expression a fundamental human right.They must resist the inexorable logic of the so-called free market, and advocate for the fundamental core value that there are things in this world that are not for profit – they are for something else, something more vast, meaningful and enduring, and that artists can lead the way.”

Quote from Andrew Horwitz

Had to pop that in here… So good.  So true!

The downside is we live in a culture which fundamentally devalues artists.  This is reflected in the fact that artists don’t get paid for exhibiting their work… rather they are used as a source of income generation, often through so called “opportunities” which involve hiring out space. There are exceptions to this, and what a jewel it is when they come up, but they are few and far between.  The majority of the general public are not aware that artists are the ones who pay to show their work, in the main. (Yeah, I am taking about the “Fine Art” strand of creation, so bear this in mind!) They are not aware that the majority of artists probably have an income from their art working of around £5,000 a year (my informed guess, based on conversation and snippets of research done over a few years)….A DACS survey in 2010 found it around £10,000, but I think one needs to bear in mind that this is only one pool of artists, and they are likely to be the ones who have had work published here and there… (like me! but I am rather the under a £1,000 year department! lol!) and this is across the range of visual art, not “fine art” alone.   Also bear in mind “Careers typically are sustained by a portfolio of other activities with 35% having a formal second job.”  And also need to add other sources of income, ie spouse, partner, etc.  So generally speaking, the majority of artists are supported in some way, but not by the the proceeds of their labours…  This is important to recognise.  But it is not convenient to recognise.

Yes, I am grateful I can do what I do… No taking for granted here, with me…I waited long enough to be able to do what I always dreamed of, but this doesn’t mean that I have money to invest in paying for the luxury of showing my work…and being an income source for others!  I’ts my choice to do what I do, and I am glad I have that choice, but it does not make my creative work less work because it doesn’t reap financial rewards sufficient to make it profitable, or a source of life sustaining income. 

This is not a rant, (well… OK, maybe it is!)  but it needs to said to increase awareness.  If the general public, who are able to and so inclined, wish to support artists and are more aware of how much that support is needed and valued, then this is all well and good.  Even if they don’t, I still think awareness is a good thing. The reason I think it is important is that artists are often treated as though they operate as businesses when in reality they just don’t. Often by businesses…not so incidentally!   Well, yes, there are some, of course, but some of us don’t want to be, don’t choose to be, or don’t want to change our direction/work by attempting to be… This art working matter is a different matter from income generation, and without the financial aspect, it is still a worth while, valuable, and a valid contribution to the world; the life sustaining dimension of art should not be underestimated… It may not be linked with finance in the way many other activities are but that does not make it any less purposeful. Or significant.

However, this doesn’t mean that we don’t need finance, and that we are not going to price our work in such a way that it helps fund our creative project, or that

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design?

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design? If so, then take a look at my website jamartlondon.com, for a start.

My artwork is particularly suitable for themes of: faith, religion, philosophy, Christian, church, all faith traditions, inter-faith, spirituality, the subconscious, psychoanalytic themes, mindfulness, contemplative practices, healing, health, both physical and mental, trauma recovery, metaphysical and psychological focused writings, the devotional life, and many other subjects.

Indeed, pretty much any subject matter or theme which benefits from a more abstract graphic image; one which also conveys basic feelings and ideas in an open and experimental manner; would benefit from it’s clarity of communication being enhanced by one of my art images.

From the lyrical abstraction of some of abstract expressionist style textured paintings, to the geometric abstraction clear edged imagery, which I also produce, the value of non representational imagery in book cover design which is both colourful and interesting, and stimulates the eye with colour and striking composition, cannot be under estimated.

If you are looking for something particular, do contact me, because I only display a small amount on the internet and may even be able to create something specific to your needs, or be able to locate something from my extensive archives which meets your need.

DACS administrate my licensing agreements and organise the use of my art work images quickly and conveniently. They are very helpful and can guide you through the process if you are unfamiliar with it. I normally follow their guidelines with respect to the fees for licensing, as these are set in line with the industry standard.

DACS do offer a good reduction in fees for registered charities. Occasionally it may be possible for slightly reduced rates to be negotiated in other circumstances.

To find out more about how you can arrange to use my imagery, see here:

https://www.dacs.org.uk/licensing-works/frequently-asked-questions#FAQ122

 

British Lyrical Abstract Paintings:  See http://www.jamartlondon.com/

A Poem of Panes

 

 

A Poem of Panes

It was only when they shattered
I felt the panes of glass between the window frame.
Those who knew me
could not see through my eyes.

I am aware of the surface, and of my own sinking.

I set my face forward,
but cannot progress.

They call my brother’s head injury “the invisible disability”.

The impact of one, booted, blow
also
unseen

in me.

Jenny Meehan 2014

The artwork I produce often relates to my psychological and emotional recovery journey, which is related to past trauma. In this instance, the full realisation of the impact of my brother’s traumatic brain injury on his personality and functioning, our relationship, and of its effect on my own mental capacity, made several years of my life exceptionally difficult. A major part of the difficulty was my inability to express what I was going through. Though able to function through the depression and anxiety (sometimes “just about”) , my awareness was that of being disabled internally, due to the shattering of my sense of self, and the isolation I felt. This is something I will never forget . Art can be a wonderful and powerful communicator of a person’s journey.

I’m working through my own traumas, and very grateful to be able to do so.  There is an image for the above poem, but it’s way back in the archives and I’m a bit pressed for time today, but I can dig it up in the future and I will post it.  It is the case that it is far easier for me to create visual art and write than it is to verbally speak about my own experiences.  I am sure this is very true for a large number of people.  While I can talk to a certain extent, it is far easier not to.  I do have an ongoing interest in trauma and recovery which just seems to continue  and certainly stretches far beyond my own experience.

I think it’s brilliant that mental health is more in the spotlight than it has been previously and there certainly is less stigma about it.  Here is an excellent read below.  I have just included a short extract here, but do follow the link to read the whole article.

 

For John Launer, GP educator and narrative medicine pioneer, medically unexplained symptoms are better understood as ‘medically unexplored stories’. Most GPs, especially those who work in deprived areas, bare witness every day to their patients’ accounts of trauma; including physical abuse and neglect; parents who were, because of alcoholism, drug abuse or mental illness unable to care for their own children in their earliest years; stories of material and emotional deprivation, abandonment and loss, domestic violence, crime and imprisonment and with shocking frequency, child abuse. Trauma begets trauma so that people rendered vulnerable by trauma in childhood are very frequently victims of violence and abuse in later life. Survivors of trauma use drugs and alcohol to cope with the aftermath, then find themselves involved with crime which leads to imprisonment and homelessness and further cycles of alienation and despair.

People whose work does not involved repeated encounters with survivors of trauma frequently either cannot believe, or refuse to believe how common it is. For years it’s been assumed that people invented stories of trauma to excuse bad behaviour. The medical profession bears a lot of responsibility for this, largely ignoring the psychological consequences of rape until the last 30 years.”

We need to talk about trauma

Long Stream of Paintings

 

And here lies a long stream of paintings… Or should I say, pieces of paintings, fragments of paintings, parts of paintings?

I take a lot of photographs as I work.  It is a good way of considering the material qualities of the paintings.  Something about isolating a section in a frame makes the eye think about it differently.  It may become the beginning of something new, but if it does not, this is of no consequence.  The process of taking images isn’t in order to achieve anything other than looking again and seeing again, and maybe being introduced to the composition within the composition, which I didn’t know was there!  It enables me to meditate further on the paint.  This may sound unusual for someone who is not a painter, but for a painter, meditating on the paint is very helpful indeed!

 

British Lyrical Abstract Paintings:  See http://www.jamartlondon.com/

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

 

Breaking my paintings into fragments by taking the images… It is a way of looking closely at them… but also interesting that I create in such a piecemeal way these paintings, pulling the work together into a whole, and then insist on breaking them up again afterwards, in one kind of way, at least!

 

British Lyrical Abstract Paintings:  See http://www.jamartlondon.com/

Into the Studio Tent for 2019!

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract expressionist lyrical textural colorist paintings

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

 

Yes!  As the weather warms and I begin to tidy up the mess, so the studio tent becomes a place of artistic production!

Feeling GREAT!

 

Another good read…

One of my keen interests … I guess that’s what comes of having an exceptionally high ACE score myself! Lol!  This is a great read, and very heartening!  I have come a long way myself, but it’s a rough road to travel on, and exceptionally challenging at times!  All worth while work though.

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/the-last-best-cure/201508/8-ways-people-recover-post-childhood-adversity-syndrome

 

Jenny Meehan Contemporary British Female Artist

 

(Just in case you were not sure about that!!!! )

My original artwork has two main strands: Lyrical Abstraction, painterly, fluid, with a lot of focus on light, how it bounces off the surface, textures and finishes, and Geometric Abstraction (created through digital imaging software) in which I focus on flat areas of smooth, solid, and translucent colour; ideally intended to be printed on even, matt or semi-mat surfaces.

While I’m experimenting with the overlap between the two, and make it my practice to regularly try out new mediums, in order to keep my artwork fresh and steadily evolving, identifying the strands in this way is helpful for clarity.  I use writing and poetry in my art working and now prefer to use sol-silica paint over acrylics or oils, though I am still known to dabble in many different types of paint, due to their particular material and visual qualities!

If you would like to give money to help support my creative practice, I can accept it quickly and easily through the Paypal.me process. Simply put the following in your browser:
paypal.me/jennymeehan
and follow the prompts. Please consider supporting my work in this way if it strikes a chord with you and you are able to do so. I do need support in order to continue my art working.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742 direct link to contact page of website

Signing up as a follower on my WordPress blog ( https://jennymeehan.wordpress.com) also helps, as does sharing the posts when you receive them.  Anything you can do to help me is much appreciated!

My artwork is particularly suitable for themes of: faith, religion, philosophy, Christian, church, all faith traditions, inter-faith, spirituality, the subconscious, psychoanalytic themes, mindfulness, contemplative practices, healing, health, both physical and mental, trauma recovery, metaphysical and psychological focused writings, the devotional life, and many other subjects.

All my images are licensable and this is arranged through the Designer and Artists’ Copyright Socitety (DACS). If you wish to use my artwork, please contact me in the first instance.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742 direct link to contact page of website

Alongside my mainly lyrical abstract paintings, there is another important strand in my work which includes more of a narrative.  Well, some kind of narrative. Through my writing, and my participation in ongoing psychotherapy, I draw on my subconscious.  It’s this process of self reflection, examination, and other contemplative practices which are rooted in my own faith tradition as a Christian, alongside a good dose of yoga and West African drumming, which have created an exciting way ahead for my work with visual art.  I think it’s the relationship between my writing and visual work, particularly through poetry, which helps determine the direction in my art practice.

I’m a member of Kingston Artists’ Open Studios: http://www.kingstonartistsopenstudios.co.uk/product-category/artists-m-to-z/

 

Interesting Television Programme

I have watched the “Basquiat – Rags to Riches” programme recently. Several times.

Here is the text about the programme:

The recent Sotheby’s auction of a Jean-Michel Basquiat Skull painting for over a hundred million dollars has catapulted this Brooklyn-born artist into the top tier of the international art market, joining the ranks of Picasso, de Kooning and Francis Bacon. This film tells Jean-Michel’s story through exclusive interviews with his two sisters Lisane and Jeanine, who have never before agreed to be interviewed for a TV documentary. With striking candour, Basquiat’s art dealers – including Larry Gagosian, Mary Boone and Bruno Bischofberger – as well as his most intimate friends, lovers and fellow artists, expose the cash, the drugs and the pernicious racism which Basquiat confronted on a daily basis. As historical tableaux, visual diaries of defiance or surfaces covered with hidden meanings, Basquiat’s art remains the beating heart of this story” 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b098pd3q

What an interesting programme and it’s opened my eyes up.  Not sure quite what the results will be, but feeling very inspired.  

The exhibition looks good too, must get to see it!  I have booked to see it in November.  This is very exciting!

Here is some information on the exhibition:

The first large-scale exhibition in the UK of the work of American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960—1988).

Discover the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat, the pioneering prodigy of the 1980s downtown New York art scene. This unprecedented exhibition brings together an outstanding selection of more than 100 works from international museums and private collections. Engage in the explosive creativity of Basquiat who worked with Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Blondie, among others. Featuring rare film, photography and archive material, the show captures the spirit of this self-taught artist, poet, DJ and musician whose influence, since his death at 27 in 1988, has been enormous.”

https://www.barbican.org.uk/whats-on/2017/event/basquiat-boom-for-real

Chester Open Art Exhibition 2017

One of my prints is still on display and has just been sold!  It was made available for sale as part of the Chester Open Art Exhibition 2017.  I have suddenly realised I don’t think I posted this up as a news item on this blog!  Better late than never!

How the months fly by!

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved leap of faith (jennifer meehan) jenny meehan geometrical abstrace design artwork fine art print to buy

leap of faith jenny meehan (jennifer meehan) geometrical abstract design artwork fine art print to buy © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

https://chesterartcentre.co.uk/chester-art-centre-open-exhibition-2017/

Information about the venue…

Joseph Benjamin is a Chester restaurant owned and run by brothers Ben and Joe Wright. The idea behind the restaurant is simple – top quality food and drink in a comfortable and relaxed environment, prepared with honesty and integrity and served with care and attention.

Joseph Benjamin opens at 9am for coffee and breakfast. Lunch is served from noon till 3pm and then, on a Thursday, Friday and Saturday, dinner is served from 6pm.

David Gill, Jenny Meehan, James March, Michele Landel, Susan Welsby, Liz Fitzgerald-Taylor, Ian Hill Smith are the artists with work on display.

The work looks very nice indeed!  I did have a nice image of it in situ but cannot locate it right now, however will post when I have found it!

Becoming – Painting and Poem by Jenny Meehan

“Becoming
light and colour.
The poetic space
coming together.
In one, long, moment
I will take you there,
and you will see
beauty in brokenness. ”

Jenny Meehan

© Jenny Meehan  All Rights Reserved

 

catastrophe becoming painting 100days100women.wordpress.com, abstract expressionist lyrical romantic painting, jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

catastrophe becoming painting by jenny meehan submitted to 100days100women.wordpress.com british collectable abstract paintings

 

I have submitted the above work for an excellent project by author Henry Martin.  Who knows if anything will come of it or not, but I actually feel so glad that such a project is being done that I am delighted to submit whatever the outcome may be.  And thankfully no charge involved to submit.   That’s always a blessing.  Here is some of the call out text:

To celebrate the launch of the biography Agnes Martin: Pioneer, Painter, Icon (published March 2018) author Henry Martin will promote 100 women artists on the blog 100days100women.wordpress.com from November 2017–March 2018.

Painters, sculptors, textile artists, illustrators, graphic designers, ceramicists; artists of all practices are invited to send their work for consideration. Selected artists will be featured alongside invited artists including:

Ying Ang, Elinor Carucci, Eleanor Crow, Suzanne Dean, Milena Dragicevic, Joy Gerrard, Jenny Grigg, Anne Jordan, Polly Morgan, Adrian Piper, Aidan Salakhova, Karen Schiff, Heidi Specker, Clare Twomey, Jo Walker, and Bettina von Zwehl.

Henry Martin says, “100Days100Women is a corrective measure I can take as a biographer and art writer, to not only educate myself on contemporary art practice by women artists known and unknown to me, but also to fight against historical precedent in the disappearance of art by women in art history books, the marketplace, and human consciousness.”

The feminist writer Jill Johnston once said of Agnes Martin: ‘During every terrible decade it’s a pleasure finding a great woman.’ I believe that we live in such a terrible decade, but we are lucky that there are many great women still to find and champion.

Submissions can be made on 100Days100Women.wordpress.com, and followed on Facebook at @100Days100Women. “

 

I look forward to seeing the project unfolding.

 

Before Knee Replacement…

Do you know, I STILL look back sometimes to what life was like before my knee replacement.  With a sigh of relief it is over.  Now over seven months post op I can now RUSH around.  That’s new.  Good exercise, walking fast.  Fantastic to be able to make plans to see exhibitions in London with no doubts that I will be able to get where I need to go!  While the weeks and months after TKR are a huge challenge, I still hold to the precept that the time period of a year (at least) before was far worse. Because of going nowhere, and not even going nowhere fast.  Going nowhere SLOW.  And sometimes going nowhere at all!  The lack of mobility was killing me.

Had a bit of a dark phase before my TKR..Paintings at the end of 2016 went very dark…

Dark Night Painting by Jenny Meehan

This painting which I did put up on jamartlondon.com is still standing its ground.

dark night of the soul painting, abstract expressionist painting by jenny meehan, british 21st century female woman painter artist, lyrical abstraction,woman artists contemporary collectable, black white painting,jenny meehan jamartlondon,

dark night of the soul abstract painting jenny meehan jamartlondon

Dark Night Painting by Jenny Meehan. Available for sale, Please contact Jenny Meehan via the contact form on my website if interested in adding this work to your art collection!  http://www.jamartlondon.com

http://www.jamartlondon.com

I am standing around a lot too…  Kind of useful for painting!  Climbing up ladders and all sorts!  Back in action!

Female Abstract Expressionists

Terminology is crude, but I guess I would fit into that bracket.  I like to call my work “Romantic, Expressionistic, Abstract, Lyrical” painting.  But too many words for everyday use!

On the abstract expressionist theme, I have now taken some time to look into some female artists whose style can be defined as being in the abstract expressionist camp.  Abstract expressionism can reek of male dominance in my imagination… and there is possible a reason for this, as many female abstract expressionists seem to have dissolved more into the wings of the art theatre…

But women all over the world are completely immersed in the wonders of expression through non-objective painting…  And always have done…and always will!

Perle Fine is one painter I have looked at recently…

http://www.perlefine.com/collections.html

Quote Marika Herskovic:

“Perle Fine belonged to the early generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist Artists whose artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized across the Atlantic including Paris. New York School Abstract Expressionism represented by Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline and others.”

Few nice quotes by Perle Fine:

 

“Feeling is what we are involved with” and

“I don’t paint to sell and I don’t paint not to sell”

I will keep that in mind!

https://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/interviews/oral-history-interview-perle-fine-12709

From the transcript, quote I find most interesting right now:

“PERLE FINE: Yes. Well, after leaving the Hofmann School—well, of course this was happening all the time I was at the Hofmann School—I realized that there was no such thing as semi-abstract painting; that one couldn’t be semi-abstract any more than you could—well, it’s like saying I feel a little bit strongly about something, you see. Because for a thing to be abstract meant to me that you had to feel strongly enough about it to turn your back on realism and do everything necessary in an abstract way to put across a feeling which meant being totally abstract or non-objective.”

And very interesting reading on her process.

 

Perle Fine was married to the photographer and art director Maurice Berezov.  Despite her innovative exploration of Abstract Expressionism, which she fused with an interest in the pure forms of Neo-Plasticism, Fine was not included in the Whitney’s 1978 show “Abstract Expressionism: The Formative Years,” which she contested in two letters to the museum.  She later became a renowned professor at Hofstra University.

A quote from Perle Fine I find inspiring:   “I never thought of myself as a student or teacher, but as a painter. When I paint something I am very much aware of the future. If I feel something will not stand up 40 years from now, I am not interested.”

 

The “Very Patient Knee Replacement Story” goes on, and on, and on and on…!

Well back in September now I wrote my latest update. Waiting for the eight month mark for the next update, but cannot resist a little narrative here!

In September I focused a lot on post operative depression and also on how I found yoga very helpful in my rehabilitation.

I am most grateful that I discovered the practice of yoga through the Our Parks scheme, because it has made a huge difference to my health and happiness. When I started doing it a couple of years back it made me aware of how limited my mobility was, helped my limbs to keep moving and to be as flexible as was possible, and helped all my soft tissues both pre and post op. It generally re-introduced me to the joy and importance of movement, something I had lost somewhat over the years. I realised how integral movement is to my sense of self. It brought an appreciation of how an embodied contemplative practice is so very beneficial and facilitated my general orientation towards the contemplative way of life, including the practice of mindfulness, which was something I had already started to embrace.  So three hundred cheers for Our Parks!

https://ourparks.org.uk/

On the subject of yoga,  a collector recently brought the two “Yoga Inhale” and “Yoga Exhale” paintings.  I am pleased they are still together.  They look great in her home.

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reservedchakra colours painting, chakra colours art, chakra movement opening, yoga inhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reservedyoga inhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

 

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved yoga chakra colours opening painting art, chakra art, chakra dance, yoga exhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reservedyoga exhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

I love it when my paintings find owners!

I have very real space issues here.  Living in a two up two down (well, three down!) house and being an artist presents some problems.  I am currently in the process of trying to organise all my work, equipment, materials and resources a little better.  Unfortunately this means that for a couple of weeks I have not done any painting at all.  I am getting irritable and cross.  However I will reap the rewards of being able to find things easier when it is done.  I now have quite a good system for locating particular paintings which is good because when art collectors are interested in buying one of my paintings, it helps a great deal if I can find it quickly!!!

 

Crossing Over, Letting Go and Entering the World of the Other

abstract lyrical expressionist british paintings jenny meehan

abstract lyrical expressionist british paintings jenny meehan

 

Crossing Over, Letting Go and Entering the World of the Other Painting by Jenny Meehan, available for sale please contact if interested. 

Available for sale, Please contact Jenny Meehan via the contact form on my website if interested in adding this work to your art collection!  http://www.jamartlondon.com

http://www.jamartlondon.com

The direction in my thinking on this painting above:

Deep Dialogue
Professor Leonard Swidler, in collaboration with Professor Ashok Gangadean, helped delineate the ‘Seven Stages of Deep Dialogue’ to describe the potential for dialogue leading to transformation. This narrative was intended as a meditation. This painting also: “Crossing Over, Letting Go and Entering the World of the Other”.

54x44cm external frame. Acrylic on Hardboard. Sealed with a protective layer of acrylic varnish. Light natural wood frame.

See more of this group of paintings on my website, jamartlondon.com.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/paintings-2017/4592780606 

Above is link direct to page.

 

In a bit of a fix…

A lot of my photographic art work involves images of fixings and fastenings of different kinds.  Images taken of buildings, mainly small out buildings like garages or beach huts, or garden gates or the backs of buildings seen from alleyways and rear access roads.  Most of these photographs were taken between  2007 and 2012, a period of five years which were for myself a period of certainly feeling I was falling apart, so maybe not surprisingly the orientation towards fixings was meaningful to me.   The need to hold myself together, though falling apart, is necessary for a mother who has care of others but needs to carry on functioning in life!  So the felt need was great!  In a big way, having responsibility for others can be helpful, even if tough times, as long as the strain is not too great.  Because you have to keep going.  But one needs to get help when falling apart from the inside.

It also occurs to me that the interest in fixings, which has translated itself into many of my paintings… mainly those with a structural, building type feel, like for example the “Nelson Square” painting, and it’s more recent “Nelson Square Two ” (which I am still working on, still in progress); this interest also says something maybe about my experience of having a bit of a “Fixer” relationship pattern.  I can see it more now, and am more aware of it, and it’s pitfalls.  Of which there are many!  But it is interesting as a creative… that love of putting things together, drawing together, uniting, balancing, melding things which are apart.  Articulating.  Joining. Building structure, and formation generally!  So positive and wonderful.  I spend myself and give myself through the process.  And this is rewarding.  I love it and find it fulfilling.  But to try and do this with other people is not good at all.  To try to do for others what is their own responsibility is very negative indeed.  As with many of our drives and urges, there is a positive and negative aspect.  It’s helpful to recognise both!  And so…

What is the  Fixer Relationship Type?

Note: Firstly, when categorising, it is important to realise that we are all rather piecemeal…The category is clumsy and only gives an approach to a personality…It is not there to confine or restrict but just to serve as an aid in thinking, and that alone.  The reality of each one of us is that we are far too complex to fall into any one category!!!

It sounds good, being a “fixer” but most people who tend this way learn their fixing behaviours in childhood, maybe by being burdened with inappropriate amounts of responsibility, in various ways, for example caring for siblings or even parents,  in “role reversal” where the child switches places with the adult.  It’s not good, but happens.  It’s hard to get out of the habit and so one tends to take it on into situations beyond childhood,  even seeking others to administer to!!!

This has an effect on the fixer’s adult relationships, as because one is looking for someone to fix, one tends to be drawn to those who maybe are not so able to participate in an equal relationship…The fixer may end up propping up the relationship more than is healthy and may get none or few of their own needs met.   This can also be limiting for the fixer, who may tend to believe that they will only be loved for what they do and not for the person they are.  Those who, in childhood, should have loved and taken care for them unconditionally, were not able to do that, and so the child was overburdened and understood that only if they do what their parents need them to do, may they have their own needs met.

So now, if you are a Fixer type, when you’d like to have a give and take relationship with another adult who is your equal, it is hard often to know how to let that happen. It can be scary to risk letting another person learn to love you for you, without you doing anything to bind that person to you for the care taking or other things you can do for them. Instead of rescuing someone or protecting them from themselves, you let them grow into their own personal sense of responsibility and you do the same for yourself in a way which has clear boundaries and which respects both yourself and the other person. The dynamic of you trying to fix things all the time can then stop, and if they are in discomfort or upset, you can feel their suffering, empathise, be compassionate,  but you don’t take responsibility for it.   Healthy boundaries are really worth developing!  You may choose to help in some way, but it won’t be because you are trying to earn their love.  And it is much easier to say “No” when you need to.

So from “fixing” to “mending”… A related activity, for sure… Beautiful mending, in the drawing together of different elements on a piece of board, using paint and card.  This is a healthy form of fixing activity!

“Mending” Painting by Jenny Meehan.  Available for sale.  Please contact if interested! 

lyrical abstraction contemporary artist british, female artist jenny meehan london based, lyrical abstraction process led painting,collectable abstract paintings for collectors, jenny meehan jamartlondon uk, art historical relevant significant art british,exploratory innovative paintings, british women artists current today,affordable original paintings to buy uk, collectable paintings original british contemporary a

abstract lyrical expressionist british paintings jenny meehan

This original painting is available for sale, Please contact Jenny Meehan via the contact form on my website if interested in adding this work to your art collection!  http://www.jamartlondon.com

http://www.jamartlondon.com

I think I may have only posted this painting up recently, but never mind.  It’s good to look at it again, while mulling over the interest in fixings!!!

 

Poem to accompany “Mending” Painting – Jenny Meehan 2016

 

I scream out to be fixed

because I have fallen apart

And everywhere I see fixings fixed on

panels and walls and buildings

And I, flat faced and dropping into my feet

Cannot stand the sight which draws me forwards

Because it testifies to the problem I face

Surrounding me, encapsulating me

with  horror struck security

But there is no comfort

Because nobody knows anything deeper than

my own panels

paint stained panels

painted

by rain

inside

and out.

 

© Jenny Meehan

Best FIXING experience of 2017 – Total Knee Replacement!

Well, my best fixing experience recently has been my TKR (Total Knee Replacement) surgery of March 2017.  It may have been painful but definitely worth it.  I need to be on my feet a lot.  Now I can be.  Surgery is a wonderful thing.  Mind you, I have been splitting my sides watching the BBC series “Quacks” of late.  It has me falling over with laughter. (The only falling over I am now doing!)  I don’t think I would want a surgeon let loose on my knee in Victorian times.  Thankfully, wonderful developments in modern medicine, healthcare, surgery and hospitals make something like knee replacement possible.

It is odd how my interest in trauma and recovery, which started orientated around the psychological and emotional type of trauma, took a leap into the physical realm with the TKR.  Surgery is traumatic for the body, and the body is connected to the mind and emotions.  I always dislike people referring to knee replacement surgery as “brutal” because while it is major, I don’t associate it with brutality.  (Maybe in Victorian times this would be apt!)  There is nothing cruel about surgery…it’s not violence.  Having experienced physical violence as a child and teenager, it becomes very important to recognise the difference. If one gets the two mixed up in the brain, it does not help healing or recovery one little bit. I was quite surprised in the bulk of my TKR recovery (ie first four months) how positive (mostly) I felt.  Yes, the body is traumatised and the surgery invasive.  But it is completely different when you willingly place yourself in a situation which is designed and intended to to heal and help someone.  It still isn’t easy.  But it is no way brutal.  I was so much wanting and needing the surgery, that I guess I was “up for it” in terms of my mindset.  Dealing with it is hard. Yet for me personally, the experience was much better than the longer term disintegration of my life which was falling apart due to the effect of long term pain and increasing physical disability.

It’s not gentle though!  Rather like being a bit of woodwork with all those saws and drills!

So worth it now though.  So worth it.

 

Yoga and Christianity Thoughts

Shared by Christians Practicing Yoga on Facebook.

Here’s a good summary of some important scholarly work on the history of modern postural yoga. It serves as a corrective to the idealized and frankly ahistorical versions taught in many yoga classes and teacher trainings.

http://www.popmatters.com/column/on-evil-yogis-and-the-icy-silence-of-yogas-post-disintegration/

 

I found the above an interesting read.   My own perspective of healing in relation to my own experience of practising yoga is that through my own practice I open myself up to the Holy Spirit and experience the benefits of Mindfulness with attention to my body which I find extremely helpful.  I am being kind and attentive to my body, valuing it, as a temple of the Holy Spirit.   Being introduced to Yoga a couple of years back  has been something I am very grateful for, and something which I have received a lot of blessing through.   Through the frustrations of my experience with osteoarthritis, I have found that what I CAN do, through the practice of Yoga has been a huge encouragement and helped me to continue to direct compassion and faith towards my humble frame.  The release of stress, the practice of being kind and attentive to myself, the continued choice, in the end, to love my body and work with it, accepting it and being grateful for it (even with the painful and often not working very well knee!) has brought a real sense of faith embodied which has been inspiring me to continue and to embrace the blessing of doing it.    It has been and is something completely incorporated into my devotional and prayer life…  It has helped me attend to myself and to my maker in a disciplined and very liberating way.

I have never felt any sense to conform to any beliefs that I do not hold or do not feel comfortable with.   Where I felt disagreement, maybe in some verbalised meditation,  I simple change direction and articulation of my thought, for example, rather than saying  “I am not my body”   I say (internally!) “I am not just my body”  because I personally don’t aim for separation of my parts, however, I do recognise the value in a consciousness that can view things from another perspective. (Apologies,  I am not in the know about the meaning of that phrase… It may be just poetic anyway and probably has many different interpretations/philosophies in hand…For others it may be essential to their experience of Yoga practice, but it is not for mine).

But I wander off.. I found the article a good read, and it gave me a little bit of an overview which I am sure is helpful to be aware of.  Particularly with respect to some of the scare mongering narratives which seem to circulate around discussions about Yoga in relation to Christianity.    I found this part of particular relevance to my own experience:

“…part of White’s research is to restore the understanding of historic yoga as a counterbalance to the modern New Age spirituality and self-help commercialism that now dominates the practice.
For example, in his 2014 book on the Yoga Sūtras, part of the Princeton University Press Lives of Great Religious Books series, he explicates Patanjali’s four-word definition of yoga (lacking any verbs, mind you) that has become the foundation of modern meditational practice: yoga-citta-vritti-nirodha.

While “citta” has a wide range of meanings in early Sanskrit, the most adequate nontechnical translation of the term is “thought”. As for “vritti,” it means “turning,” and is related to the –vert in the English words introvert (“turned inward”) and extrovert (“turned outward”) as well as invert, subvert, pervert, revert, and so forth. Nirodha is a term meaning “stoppage” or “restraint” in Sanskrit. A simple translation of yoga-citta-vritti-nirodha should then read something like “Yoga is the stoppage of the turnings of thought.”

White offers 22 different translations of this phrase from sources ranging from handbooks on modern yoga to the work of other scholars. Here are five:

Yoga is to still the patternings of consciousness.

Yoga is the ability to direct the mind exclusively toward an object and sustain that direction without any distractions.

Yoga happens when there is stilling (in the sense of continual and vigilant watchfulness) of the movement of thought—without expression or suppression—in the indivisible intelligence in which there is no movement.

Yoga is the control of thought-waves in the mind.

Yoga is the icy silence of post-disintegration.

That’s a whole lot of interpretation of four nouns lacking a verb.”

The above is quoted from the article on  popmatters.com and was written by William Gibson

On Evil Yogis and the Icy Silence of Yoga’s Post-Disintegration”  published 12th October 2015.  You can read the whole thing here:

http://www.popmatters.com/column/on-evil-yogis-and-the-icy-silence-of-yogas-post-disintegration/

 

In relation to my lack of mobility (now thankfully past!) I credit the practice of yoga as playing a key part in my journey to movement!  It was fantastic both before and after my knee replacement surgery, and obviously gentle and adapted, sensitive yoga, which focuses on body awareness and mindful appreciation of the body and movement, is a very helpful thing to do.  Relaxation is very important for a good recovery, and so some odd reason, quite difficult after knee replacement surgery.  So with the full lung breathing and directing breath towards areas of tension in the body…Well, it all helps!

A Few Photographs…

A few photographs… To fill the time which does not need to be filled!

Some of the things which strike me I capture in a photograph…It serves as a reminder for the times when I stopped to look a little longer.  Taking photographs can be a nice form of meditation…You cut out all the other things which call to be seen and focus in on the one which appeals to you the most.  Then, isolated, compose it carefully as you dwell on it even longer.  The best part of taking a photograph is the moment something strikes… It’s worth staying a while after taking the image to look at what you have seen a bit longer.  Drawing demands more of your time, and for that reason, photography comes in handy if you cannot stop for long…

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

This was taken in the New Forest on one family holiday.   I do love the weather beaten look!  The New Forest is somewhere I have visited many times.  It was particularly good this year as I could walk freely around in it!

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

A quiet moment spent in West Dean Gardens…It’s fun to get right down to ground level as this often makes for a more interesting composition.  Though my painting is abstract, it is observation of the beauty in nature which I would credit with informing it most.  You don’t need to recognise objects in an art work to appreciate the colour, form, movement, light and space.  I spend a lot of time looking at natural forms.

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

Here is the same place photographed from a greater distance with a less dynamic composition!  The tree in the middle makes the whole image very still, and it’s rather boring.  Getting up closer is something which often brings improvement, and trying out unusual angles and composition often yields better results.  However, there is also a rather nice restful feeling. Almost a reflection suggested and the horizontal line and equilibrium has its own appeal.

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny dohan jamartlondon photography

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

Just a few more.  We live in a world so saturated with images that the appeal of printing and presenting my photography has kind of got lost for me.  I sometimes produce work using my photography or photographic elements/collage.  It is useful at times.  I am not taking anywhere as many photographs as I used to.  Apart from the occasional spate of picture taking or working with past images. And of course the recording and archiving of my current paintings.  Images of paintings in progress can also be useful.

 

 

 

“Tree by Water”  Monoprint

tree by water monoprint 2017

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved tree by water monoprint 2017

I entered this into “One-Off” – The Masters Monoprint Exhibition at The Bankside Gallery

(Thames Riverside
48 Hopton Street
London SE1 9JH

Tel. 020 7928 7521
info@banksidegallery.com)

Details here:

ONE-OFF | THE MASTERS | MONOPRINT

8 – 19 NOVEMBER

‘The Masters’ is a series of annual exhibitions established by the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers focusing on a particular branch of printmaking each year. This year’s exhibition will be curated by Morgan Doyle RE and will showcase works using monoprint in a variety of forms.”

But sadly it was not accepted.  Ah well, not room for everything!

I will  pop along to take a look though, I am sure it will be brilliant!

Painting – Being a Mother-Artist, Yet necessity is the mother of invention!  Plato in book 2 of The Republic wrote “Then, I said, let us begin and create in idea a State; and yet the true creator is necessity, who is the mother of our invention.”

Necessity is the mother of invention is my favourite phrase at the moment!

This time of year is mostly a time for reviewing and reflecting over past work.  This is partly because my studio tent is a complete mess, it is colder, the garden is wetter,(so not so good for painting in!) and I have had to bring my plants into the studio tent, so it is now functioning more as a green house!

This is so important.  It’s not about production.  Rotting leaves bring richness to the soil.  Sometimes you just leave things.  There is always plenty to do.  Looking backwards is part of moving forwards. It’s preparing the ground.

Looking at these two paintings below, reminds me of my recent movement from actual texture to perceived texture in my paintings.  And with the Matisse exhibition at the Royal Academy I visited recently having reminded me of pattern, I wonder if I may bring that in more?  The idea has been lurking around for a while but it hasn’t happened yet.  As I work on so many things in such a piecemeal fashion,  I find it a great asset that there are so many periods of time elapsing as part of the process of painting each painting.  So much opportunity to float ideas around, and yet not have them land all at once in the work which is happening.

It’s funny that what used to frustrate me, ie the necessary responsibilities of being a mother and homemaker, has turned out unexpectedly to help me in my work.  Now the children are a bit older, it is much easier to get my painting done.  Sometimes it is still annoying that I cannot spend more time painting.  But all the other stuff doesn’t seem to stop me.  I have learnt to prioritise things better.  It is a restriction.. because being an artist is not just about producing the work… there are so many other aspects.  So I am restricted by being a Mother-Artist, in some ways.   But I guess even if I was not, there would be other restrictions.  So it is best not to dwell on them.  In the end, being able to paint is a most fantastic freedom.   I will always be glad of it.  I am always exceptionally grateful for being able to do it. This is the main thing.

 

unerring want of running water painting jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

unerring want of running water  ONE painting jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

 

unerring want of running water painting jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

unerring want of running water TWO painting jenny meehan

These two above, past paintings, 2016. Both were sold to the same art collector who wanted them both.  I am always pleased when my paintings find their new home.  Unerring Want (of) Running Water 2  was exhibited as part of the exhibition at Kingston Museum in 2016.  Details:

“Kingston Art 2016: Anagrams Opens Friday 29 April at Kingston Museum
29th April to 2nd July 2016
Opening on Friday 29 April at Kingston Museum, Anagrams is an exhibition which showcases the winning entries to a competition where artists from Kingston upon Thames’ local artists’ groups, ASC Kingston (Artists Studio Company Kingston), Hawks Road, Fusion Art and KAOS (Kingston Artists Open Studios), have entered new work under the theme Anagrams.

This is an exhibition of transformational art, where the art work and the artist’s explanations of how they have approached the theme give the viewer a fascinating insight into each artist’s way of seeing and working. Many different techniques are showcased from painting, drawing and photography to mosaic, installation and much more.”

 

me in front of anagrams kingston museum banner surrey art event

me in front of anagrams kingston museum banner

Nice to have my painting blown up!

I have always liked my work to be useful in many ways, so a section of the painting being used for the poster was a bonus!  I have lost weight since then, so I am shrunk down!

At present, on the practical front, I am painting edges,  and very small parts of very many paintings, making frames, looking, thinking, writing, tidying up mess and enjoying the bit of teaching I do very much indeed.  (Information on this below).

 Drop in Drawing and Painting Workshop

Here is the information I send out to interested people:

“As a trained teacher and experienced artist I am in a good position to mentor people and  can assist you in developing your own creative direction. Individual attention not possible in larger teaching situations make this a golden opportunity for personal creative development. It is friendly and supportive group, and offers you sensitive feedback, engaging activity, elements of challenge, and most importantly the emphasis is on you developing your own personal direction with your art working.

The Drop in Drawing and Painting sessions are organised so you are able to come along on a “one-off” basis. Please let me know at least a couple of weeks before, so I know about numbers, if possible.  There are a maximum of 3 places available.  There is a choice of both Wednesday or Friday across the course of the terms, which I have weighted in favour of people on the mailing lists stated availability. Please contact me via the contact form on my website jamartlondon.com if you wish to find out more.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742

You do need to bring your own materials and equipment. If you need some advice about what to bring, just email me and I can give you some guidance. I normally have a few additional resources available, if need be, ie, pencils and paper, chalk pastels and poster paint. Sometimes it’s not always possible to know what direction you might take and I am happy to supply the unexpected material needs if they occur!

The forthcoming Drop-In Drawing and Painting sessions are as follows:

For 2017:
Wednesday 20th September 1 – 3pm
Friday 20th October 1 – 3pm
Wednesday 15th November 1 – 3pm
For 2018:
Wednesday 17th January 1 – 3pm
Friday 23rd February 1 – 3pm
Wednesday 25th April 1 – 3pm

After that I will be busy preparing for the Kingston Artists’ Open Studios 2018 and working more intensively on my own paintings!

If these dates are not convenient, it may sometimes be possible to arrange individual tuition at a cost of £20 per hour. Please contact me if you are interested and I can send you more information. My availability varies, but is restricted to week days (excluding Tuesdays) and during the hours of 9 – 3 during term times at present.

The idea of holding the Drop in sessions is that I am available to help you to develop your own projects and ideas. I will be there to add my technical and practical input, and help you by discussing your direction and the difficulties which may be encountered along the way, if you so require. As to what you actually do, this could be from drawing from the imagination, copying something from life, designing something abstract, or making a collage of text and images. Or simply experimenting and exploring what it is like to use a particular material or method of drawing.

People who come along range from absolute beginners to experienced artists, and have a range of different objectives.  Teaching input is organised around the individual, rather than delivered in a structured way, so it’s more akin to individual tuition/mentoring rather than class focused on a particular topic or course of study.  So these workshop style sessions will give you plenty of individual input and opportunities for feedback, discussion, and analysis, as you consider ways of developing your own direction.   It is informal and friendly, and provides a level of input not possible in a larger group.”

NHS Financial Pressures

I have an interest in healthcare, and as a very grateful recipient of a new knee, my appreciation of the value of the NHS has increased a lot!  I often read what the Kings Fund send out via their mailing list to me.  This was an interesting read:

https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/sites/default/files/field/field_publication_file/Understanding%20NHS%20financial%20pressures%20-%20full%20report.pdf

My own expression, of the visual type, is here:

NHS financial crisis, elective surgery joint replacement rationing, TKR graphic art, graphic image knee joint,abstract knee replacement design,abstract artwork knee joint, © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

NHS financial pressures knee replacement jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

This is currently being exhibited as part of the Art of Caring exhibition which runs until the 19th October at CONFERENCE CENTRE GALLERY, ST PANCRAS HOSPITAL, 4 ST PANCRAS WAY
LONDON, NW1 OPE.  Will be taken down soon!  Free to visit.  Lots of great work on show.   I need to go and pick it up next week.  They are having a closing event too:

THE ART OF CARING is an exhibition we are very proud of in our sometimes troubled and troubling times, looked closely, the sensitivity and joy to be found in the small detail of our artists work is deeply moving. The exhibition closes on THURS 19/10/17.  We are hosting a small closing event from 5.30pm to 7.30pm along with the premiere of Anna Bowman’s short film ARTS OF CARING at 6pm in which the filmmaker explores the exhibition and what it means for a number of the contributing artists who are filmed creating works at home and in studios. Do visit if you can…it’s a fresh looking exhibition still after 2 months display so far…Opens Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm.

Well, must go now.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

TO FOLLOW THIS ARTIST’S BLOG SIMPLY GO TO THE RIGHT HAND COLUMN, LOCATE THE  “FOLLOW” BOX AND POP IN YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS.  YOU WILL THEN RECEIVE MONTHLY UPDATES. 

 

Jenny Meehan (Jennifer Meehan) is a painter-poet, artist-author  and Christian contemplative  based in East Surrey/South West London.   Her interest in Christ-centred spirituality and creativity are the main focus of this artist’s journal, which rambles and meanders on, maybe acting as a personal (yet open to view)  note book as much as anything else.  

Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Contact Jenny via her website: 

http://www.jamartlondon.com/#/contact/4569980742

Jenny Meehan (Jennifer Meehan) BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE  offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details.  Availability depends on other commitments.    

 Jenny  works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces some representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings, other artwork forms,  and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.

This artist’s blog is of interest to artists, art collectors, art lovers and anyone interested in fine art.  Those interested in British 21st century female contemporary artists, women and art, religious art, spirituality and art, and psychoanalysis and art, will probably enjoy dipping into this Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.

Art collectors are often interested in the processes, techniques, interests and influences of the artists whose work they collect, and sharing my thoughts and perspectives through a blog is an important dimension of my creative practice.

My main focus is directed towards process led abstract painting, and you can view some examples of this on my website jamartlondon.com.  I encapsulate my painting as being romantic,expressionistic, abstract and lyrical.  Art collectors interested in lyrical abstraction, abstract expressionist, and essentially romantic art, are likely to find my paintings an interesting and exciting addition to their art collection. Art collectors can view a list of exhibitions I have taken part in on my websites exhibitions page; http://www.jamartlondon.com/#/exhibitions/4570944550

Art collectors can see selected examples of my original paintings  organised by year on jamartlondon which gives you a brief overview of the development of my painting over the years:

http://www.jamartlondon.com/#/paintings/4570156802

I am a self-representing artist, whose aim is to ensure  I continue to develop my painting practice in an innovative and pioneering way, rather than attempt some kind of commercial success, and whose aim is also that my work is historically relevant, rather then celebrated in that so called and illusive “art world”.  I hope to add to the number of people who value, collect, and develop an interest in my paintings and to thereby sustain and develop my practice over many years. 

I am also keen that my  art work is appreciated and accessible to as many people as possible, and am aware that not all art lovers and art collectors can afford to buy original paintings or limited edition prints.  For that reason I grant licenses for the use of my imagery. (See Redbubble.com and DACS information below). 

To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s  bi-annual  mailing list please contact Jenny via her website contact page:  www.jamartlondon.com

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

TO FOLLOW THIS ARTIST’S BLOG SIMPLY LOCATE THE  “FOLLOW” BOX AND POP IN YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS.  YOU WILL THEN RECEIVE MONTHLY UPDATES. 

 

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

A selection of non objective paintings can be viewed on pinterest:   https://uk.pinterest.com/Jamartlondon/

 

Help me continue my practice/art working:

 Jenny Meehan art images on Redbubble and Image Licensing through the Designer and Artists Copyright Society

If you would like a way of helping me in some small way, while benefiting from my art working yourself, then scoot along to redbubble.com where you can buy various products with my imagery on them.  It is a good company and they produce and sell their products with my images on.  I get a small royalty payment when something is sold.  It all helps a little. Here is the link to the pages on Redbubble.com which show prints with my imagery on them:

https://www.redbubble.com/shop/jenny+meehan+prints?cat_context=u-prints&page=1&accordion=department

My prints and some merchandise which uses my artwork can also be purchased safely and easily through Redbubble.com

Here is the link to the main Jenny Meehan portfolio page on Redbubble.com:

http://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams?ref=artist_title_name

 

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION

All content on this blog,  unless specified otherwise,  is © Jenny Meehan.  Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts of writing and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jenny Meehan with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  Images may not be used without permission under any circumstances. 

Copyright and Licensing Digital Images Information – Jenny Meehan

www.jamartlondon.com

Copyright in all images by Jenny Meehan is held by the artist.
Permission must be sought in advance for the reproduction, copying or any other use of any images by Jenny Meehan.

Copyright for all visual art by Jenny Meehan is managed by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) in the UK. If you wish to licence a work of art by Jenny Meehan,  you could contact Jenny Meehan in the first instance to clarify your requirements. There is a contact form on my website www.jamartlondon.com.  Alternatively you can contact the DACS directly;  https://www.dacs.org.uk/licensing-works

Licensing an image is quick and easy for both parties and is organised through the Design and Artist Copyright Society. (Note, my images are not shown on the “Art image” selection on the Design and Artist Copyright “Art Image” page. This does NOT mean you cannot apply for a license to use an image of my work from DACS… They simply have a very limited sample selection of work in their “Artimage” page!)

I have extensive archives of digital imagery, and keep records of all my art work, so  if you require an image similar to something of mine you have seen on the internet, it’s worth contacting me to see if I have something suitable for licensing if need be.  Use the contact form on my website jamartlondon.com to enquire:  http://www.jamartlondon.com/#/contact/4569980742

About Jenny Meehan (Jennifer Meehan) 

Jenny Meehan is an established artist who has been exhibiting for over ten years, mostly in the UK. Notable exhibitions include, most recently being selected for the Imagined Worlds touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ and inclusion in “Building Bridges, the Female Perspective” at Tower Bridge Victorian Engine Rooms in 2016. Jenny has been a keen supporter of various charity art exhibitions over the years including the National Brain Appeals ” A Letter in Mind” at Gallery@oxo, South Bank, London and the “Anatomy for Life” Exhibition for Brighton Sussex University Hospitals Trust in 2015

Selected by a wide range of judges in open submission exhibitions, her work appeals to the aesthetic and emotional discernment of many, and has been displayed in many prestigious galleries. These include the Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, in 2015, as part of their Open Exhibition, and the Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, West Sussex, as part of the Pallant House Gallery/St Wilfrid’s Hospice Open Art Exhibition in 2010.

Jenny Meehan’s work has been included in several academic projects and and publications including “Speaking Out – Women Recovering from the Trauma of Violence” by Nicole Fayard in 2014 and the ongoing “Recovery” Exhibition project – Institute Of Mental Health/City Arts, Nottingham University, also in 2014. While her romantic, lyrical, expressionistic, abstract paintings offer a contemplative space free from cares and concerns, other strands of her practice engage with subjects ranging from violence, trauma recovery, psychoanalysis, and mental health.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

Art Fund Raising for Straight Talking…

 

Gala Night Tuesday 8th December 7-9pm.  All Welcome!

Exhibition runs from then until 3rd January 2016.

 

http://www.straighttalking.org/

I’m donating another one of the “My Patch/Cat Print” digital prints.

my patch/cat print digital print jenny meehan jamartlondon copyright jenny meehan DACS all rights reserved

my patch/cat print digital print jenny meehan jamartlondon copyright jenny meehan DACS all rights reserved

 

‘Straight Talking Peer Education employs teenage parents to run courses in secondary schools about the realities of early parenthood. This achieves a reduction in teenage pregnancy rates and allows teenage parents to access employment.’ For further details please see their website  www.straighttalking.org   Hilary Pannack, the CEO,  will come on the Gala night with some of the peer educators and talk about their work.
http://www.thecornerhouse.org/

The cornerHOUSE runs in an old Church Hall at the junction of Douglas Road and Ravenscar Road. The postal address is:

116 Douglas Road
Surbiton
Surrey
KT6 7SB

It is best to use public transport to get to the cornerHOUSE. Buses 281, 406 and 418 stop regularly at the end of Douglas Road (ask for the police station), bus K1 stops near the end of Ravenscar Road (ask for Tolworth Hospital) and bus 71 stops in the Hook Road (ask for Thornhill Road).

Please note that if you use your own car there is no dedicated parking at the cornerHOUSE and it is usually difficult to park nearby. The cornerHOUSE is in a residential area so please allow enough time to find a safe and sensible parking space which may be some distance away. Please park with consideration for our neighbours and avoid obstructing their access ways.

 

Court Farm Cafe

I also have several digital prints up at the Court Farm Cafe,  Court Farm Garden Centre, Tolworth for a couple of months.  These are reasonably priced at just £35 and £40 so would make great Christmas presents.  Having a bit of a sort out at home, as I need more space, so effectively selling these off at a rather reduced amount!

 

jenny meehan artwork court farm cafe at chessington court farm garden centre tolworth surrey

jenny meehan artwork court farm cafe at  court farm garden centre tolworth surrey

 

jenny meehan artwork court farm cafe at chessington court farm garden centre tolworth surrey

jenny meehan artwork court farm cafe at court farm garden centre tolworth surrey

 

http://www.courtfarm.uk.com/  Old Kingston Road, Worcester Park, Surrey… It’s not far from Tolworth Rail Station.

Old Kingston Road, Worcester Park, Surrey, KT4 7QH020 8012 8626  admin@gardencare.uk.com

Hopefully it will be nice and busy, with folks getting their Christmas Trees, etc.  I could do with selling some things to help with the expenses of Christmas!

Singing in the Rain

Lyrical abstract painting… This is the final…

Singing in the Rain abstract expressionist colourist lyrical painting by jenny meehan jamartlondon

Singing in the Rain abstract expressionist colourist lyrical painting by jenny meehan jamartlondon

Singing in the Rain Images taken when in progress:

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

Yeah,  I like taking pictures of my paintings!

You might notice that it hasn’t changed that much, if at all!  The reason for this is that when I talk about a painting being “In Progress”  I consider the time I spend in contemplation/reflection/meditation (whatever your preferred word!) part of the process of the painting…Time spent waiting for paint to dry with acrylics is too, too short, and so I spend a lot of time looking at the paintings when they are dry.  I sometimes think that something is not finished when it ends up telling me that it is.  I sometimes find the opposite, and something calls out for attention several months later.  After about six months I can be more certain.  This painting lurked around and I thought it wasn’t finished, but it was.  The taking of close up images is helpful to me as it helps to freshen up my eyes and seeing of what is going on.  It sometimes helps me appreciate what a painting has to give me as it stands, which can be helpful, as it is very easy to rush forwards in a painting pushing it on to new things, when you haven’t actually seen what is there properly.

 

Resurrection Two –  Painting in Progress

Unlike the other, these image show a bit more visible development!

Resurrection Two Painting:

 

resurrection two, lyrical abstract painting jenny meehan, religious spirituality christian painting, contemporary christian fine artist, christian painter, british women artists 21st century

british collectable abstract paintings

I have colour corrected the image above so it is more like the original.  Images below haven’t had that treatment, and are therefore rather blue!

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

 

Yoga Inhale and Yoga Exhale paintings.

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

I am particularly pleased with the Yoga ones; very exciting to be able to use all the years of experimenting with acrylic paints, pigments and various mediums.   The right way up is as follows:

chakra colours painting, chakra colours art, chakra movement opening, yoga inhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

yoga inhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

 

yoga chakra colours opening painting art, chakra art, chakra dance, yoga exhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

yoga exhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

 

I posted these only a short while ago, I know, but I am VERY pleased with them!

 

November Thoughts

We should all be hibernating!

I’ve been to an excellent one day course at the Mount Street Jesuit Centre on “Spirituality and Chronic Illness”.  It was very good and will add to my training in the art of spiritual direction no doubt.   Here are the details taken from the Mount Street Jesuit Centre website.

 

Chronic illnesses – conditions which are long term and for which there is no obvious cure, affect almost half the population. Including arthritis, COPD, depression, ME, fibromyalgia and many others, these conditions often leave us tongue-tied and frustrated, struggling to find a language of faith in which to respond.

This workshop seeks to create a space for exploration of the ways in which we can encounter God in the midst of long-term physical and emotional pain. We will explore the spiritual impact of chronic illness, ways of listening to the reality of the experience, and ask how we can engage with God in the midst of pain.

This interactive day is aimed at those with chronic illness, those who live alongside them, and those involved in spiritual direction and pastoral care of people impacted by these conditions.

About Edel McClean

Edel McClean is a trainer, facilitator and spiritual director. She currently works as a learning and development officer with the Methodist Church in the North West. She was previously a team member at Loyola Hall for almost seven years. She has a commitment to Ignatian spirituality, to demystifying prayer and to empowering people to embody change within the Church. She has been living with chronic illness for 15 years.”

It was a fun, lively and interesting day, which helped us to examine the way that we communicate and also to recognise some of the theological beliefs that we sometimes hold which, often distorted and mis-applied, can make offering deep, understanding and compassionate relations with those who experience chronic pain/illness less possible. There’s a lot more I could say about it, but rather pressed for time at this point!  I met some lovely people… I always enjoy my times at Mount Street Jesuit Centre!

Go to the following, for information on Saturday Workshops coming up next year.

http://www.msjc.org.uk/events/categories/saturday-workshop/

Back to the hibernating…

I’m not currently painting, but organising and tidying.  Thinking ahead to next year, yes, already, as I mentally prepare for some future directions.  A lot of time spent reviewing the year’s work, and the directions that seemed to be indicating.

 

General Information on Jenny Meehan:

Artist’s Statement (sketchy overview, rather!)

Art, in my experience, is about exploration. I view mine as a natural and evolving process which is primarily to do with the emotions and spirit, though I do enjoy playing with concepts too. My Christian faith, relationships, and artistic contemplation and production are the main driving forces in my life.

Trees and plants, metal objects, the human figure, and many different types of man- made constructions, are subject matter I favour. I like to explore different styles of expression using a range of media; primarily paint, but also photography, poetry, and some sculpture. The brokenness of human experience fascinates me, but also the potential for growth and renewal. My work has a positive outlook, as I think that it is often through suffering, touched by God’s grace, that the beauty of the human soul is revealed. The idea of strength combined with vulnerability is particularly attractive to me.

My art is a sacramental practice, and the mystery of faith and its reality, which stretches beyond our human rational capacities, is something which interests me. I also see my work as an articulation of fragmentary experience; it’s how I make sense of the world.  Since 2010 I have put most of my creative energies into developing my skills with paint, which I love. Intensely.

 

See my website, jamartlondon.com, for more!    www.jamartlondon.com

 

 

Drop In Drawing/Painting Sessions for 2015 – Fridays- Daytime-Once a Month-Workshop Style-Beginners and Experienced Welcome
Friday 27th February 1 – 3pm
Friday 20th March 1 – 3pm
Friday 17th April 1 – 3pm
Friday 15th May 1 – 3pm
The idea is that I am available to help you to develop your own projects and ideas. I will be there to add my technical and practical input, and help you by discussing your direction and the difficulties which may be encountered along the way, if you so require. As to what you actually do, this could be from drawing from the imagination, copying something from life, designing something abstract, or making a collage of text and images. Or simply experimenting and exploring what it is like to use a particular material or method of drawing.I will provide some ideas if people like, but anticipate people coming along with some idea of what they might like to do beforehand. However, just a vague idea is just fine! Participants also need to bring their own materials along with them. I am gearing it mostly to dry media, ie pencil, charcoal, oil pastels, chalk pastels, pens, biros, markers etc. If someone sneaks a bit of paint in, I won’t complain though.. (how could I?) however, for practical reasons, you might need to work outside if you are painting medium or large scale!The idea of holding the sessions on a “drop in” basis is that is it often hard for people to commit to a regular group a long time in advance, however, you do need to let me know the same week if you will be attending, as there is limited space and so I need to know about numbers. I won’t be formally planning a structured session… On these occasions the session takes a “workshop” style approach, with plenty of individual input and opportunities for feedback, discussion, and analysis, as you consider ways of developing your own direction.
If interested, then please contact me via my website contact form http://www.jamartlondon.com for more information.   Thanks.
 Some Painting
 Some painting would be a fine thing…There is too much rubbish in the house which needs sorting!  Too many outstanding household chores, jobs, mending, admin, etc etc.  However I reflect that it’s not a bad thing to have gaps in one’s creative production.   Ill with some flu type cold, and minus my voice for a few weeks forces me into silence, and also into a nostalgic trip into the past as I look through images on CDS and put them onto a portable hard drive.  It’s great to be able to document my work myself.    For a nice escape, I took a tour.
Fancy a little tour around some of the National Gallery?   This little “Life of Christ” tour may be an enjoyable investment of time!
I have also started a mini blog on the Artists Newsletter site.  This is an attempt to make a somewhat narrower stream than river which is this meandering discourse.   I envisage this being orientated around just what I am working as I am working on it, rather than a broader span of past and present artworking.
I am concerned that I might be spewing out too many words, however, I cannot deny that I find it helpful to my creative processes.  I suspect this might be something I start and don’t continue…this does happen sometimes, but it might be useful to try, maybe focusing just on my sculpture/3D work.  ???
I have also looked back on the photography blog site…Something that kept me happy when the children were younger.   I would like to pull together some of the past imagery and self publish a book with some poems maybe.  At some point.
“When we were children, we used to think that when we were grown-up we would no longer be vulnerable. But to grow up is to accept vulnerability… To be alive is to be vulnerable.”
Madeleine L’Engle
Yeah, so true.
Past Work Review 
New Start by Jenny Meehan

New Start by Jenny Meehan

 There is something of the moon in here…Something of an orbit…It is one of the geometric abstract works from the “Signs of the Times” Series.  I had painted some flat abstract paintings several years earlier, but didn’t enjoy painting  sharp lines and didn’t see the point in going to a lot of effort to make intense, flat, smooth areas of colour with paint, when I could do so far more easily,(and get the effect that I wanted ie..smooth smooth smooth, and completely all over satin finish…so that the light would hit the physical surface in exactly the same way), far more easily with vector graphics and wonderful rich pigment ink printed by Poster Pigeon.  I don’t mind plugging them because the service and prints were excellent.
These colours I like very much, I may take and use as a start for a painting.  The moon pops into a lot of my paintings too.  Why the moon?  Maybe just because it is nice and round and white…I suspect this is what attracts me.  Looking at the moonlight as it sometimes floods into the house on a dark clear night is a wonderful experience.  The quality of light, light reflected, does seem to bathe  one in a way which the sunlight cannot.  It is more gentle, more mysterious, and a deeper kind of light.  Reflected light.
As I often do, I have played with this image, and produced this:
starting out series design by jenny meehan to buy on redbubble

starting out series design by jenny meehan to buy on redbubble

This is one of a series.
I have put these up on Redbubble.  The cards and other products are quite reasonably priced, so take a look.  If you would like to support in some small way my art working, which is far, far, from profitable in the monetary sense of the word, at least, then buying something this way will, at some point help me pay for materials.  ( I say “at some point” because I haven’t yet even reached the small amount of sales which mean that any due payments will get processed!)   I get around ten percent of whatever the cost of the item is. Only three items with my design have been sold in the last five years…!!!!!  This is common, because the pool of lovely art work is so large.  Which is good, though doesn’t make it that much of a feature in my life.  I do feel it is good to make things available though, which is why I bother with it.  I have completely given up on the idea that I might ever generate anything resembling an income from my art working.  And I don’t wish to make what I do commercial in the sense of really gearing myself up in that direction.  However, it’s always a little boost when something happens! And, materials are expensive.  We are fortunate to  get by financially as a family, but the fact that I don’t earn because I am investing my time in other directions, means that I don’t mind making little pleas like this from time to time.  I don’t paint on thin air.  It all has to come from somewhere.
Look under the products to narrow down the shown selection to something you are most interested in.  The cards are super and very good value.
If you take a look, see something you like, but don’t wish to buy at, then even enabling a “share” will be great!
If you have some inclination to support my art working in a rather more substantial way, then Cass Art gift vouchers always come in handing for art materials.  Or an Art Fund card, Tate Card, Royal Academy Card…anything like that which helps me see lots of art… A useful thing for any artist to do.  Keeps one fresh.   (feels odd to mention it, but  why not?) 
Psychotherapy
I was thinking today that we are all wounded…This is something which every single person shares with each other.  We are all the same in this respect.  Some people have a larger portion than others, but it is foolish to make measurements about such things.  We tend to be  defensive, and guarded about our suffering.  For self protection, I think.   I was reading about how groups of hens peck their weakest member, and I can see we all have a bit of this instinct in us too.  It is horrible, but true, that signs of weakness, particularly if we are not able to identify, embrace, and accept our own vulnerabilities, weaknesses and struggles, sometime contribute to decisions, both subconscious and conscious, to give other people a hard time.  I am grateful I have opportunity to delve below the surface of my own experiences, both past and present.  Therapy has been a great asset for my art working for sure.   And it has introduced me to the area of  depth psychology, which in turn leads me at times to spend time reading about different theories and approaches.  As always, there are endless numbers of different schools of thought and theories.  None on their own make up the whole picture, thankfully.  But very interesting to read about!
(Logotherapy is a form of psychotherapy proposed by the Austrian neurologist, psychiatrist, and holocaust-
survivor, Dr Viktor E. Frankl.)
Quote from:
Fabry, Joseph B.
The Pursuit of Meaning : Logotherapy Applied to Life
. Cork (4 Bridge St., Cork):Mercier Press, 1975.
 Fabry writing about a type of psychotherapy approach called Logotherapy:
” It tells him that he cannot change his past, but that he is not its slave either; that he can change his present and influence his future. It tells him that he has limitations but also great freedom within these, and that the use of this freedom can make the difference between a full and empty life; that, if not used responsibly, freedom will turn into meaningless arbitrariness. It tells him that he has choices to make, at every moment, and that he must make them in the face of constant uncertainty, that he never can wait until all answers are in. It tells him that each person is alone, yet participates in a reality that far transcends him and his understanding; that success in life does not depend on the obvious; that individual life is geared to ultimate meaning. It tells him that he can never grasp the reality of the Ultimate, whatever name is given to it, but that everything depends on how he responds to its demands. Logotherapy assumes that ultimate  meaning exists but that it is ultimately un-knowable for the individual. He only can guess at it by means of his conscience, which is part of his human make up and therefore can err. And what his best guesses will reveal is not the overall Master plan but only the meaning of one life situation at a time. He can participate in ultimate meaning only by responding, to the best of his limited capacities, to the meaning demands of the moment. The day-by-day pursuit of meaning gives content to his life. Happiness, peace of mind, satisfaction, success are only by-products of his pursuit of meaning.”
I like these thoughts, though I don’t sign up to any particular school or approach to therapy, (not knowing enough about it in the first place!)  I do rather like this quote from Fabry in addition to the above: “In philosophy something wholly new is likely not to be fully true. That holds for psychotherapy, too. If Logotherapy had achieved nothing more than to rediscover and reformulate old truths even then it would have contributed to the advancement of psychotherapy.”

 

The Imagination between Beauty and Goodness

http://www.transpositions.co.uk/2014/09/the-imagination-between-beauty-and-goodness/

Rather a snippet… But as said before…This blog is my notebook!

 

Mount Street Jesuit Centre

I am benefiting from my visits to the Mount Street Jesuit Centre.  While I cannot shake off the feeling that I am venturing, soaked in Protestantism, onto Catholic territory, I don’t mind the feeling, indeed, I quite like it.  I haven’t found it a problem, rather, it is very interesting, and I am finding, as far as I have experienced so far at least, that those who are looking to deepen their experience of the Creator God through investing time in listening and learning, and whose focus is on deepening their own personal spirituality in a determined and dedicated way, have a wider conception of the body of Christ than that exclusive idea that it is limited to one’s own particular church or church tradition.  (Thankfully!) So I am having interesting discussions and meeting lots of lovely people who were not brought up in a Baptist Church and who don’t go to an Anglican Church.

When asked what I considered myself to be recently, found myself faltering, and saying “nothing really”, explaining that I had been in a great variety of churches, including charismatic, Baptist, evangelical, house churches, and now the Anglican church.  I did mention that my choice to be baptised as an adult was particularly significant for me.  I went to a Baptist Church (Hampton Wick Baptist Church)  as a child, and the female minister Sister Edna Black was such an inspiration to me…I realise this more now as an adult than I did as a child.   So my deep roots feel mostly of that variety.  Choosing to be baptised is the most significant turning point in my life, and the symbolism of that resonates mostly through my self, particularly at this present time.  I have the Baptist  ideas on adult Baptism to thank for that.  I see it as the most helpful marker in my own experience and walk in faith.   Other people have different markers.  I don’t feel that one should have to be baptised or anything like that.  I feel that our Creator is interested in the constant conversion of our hearts as we bumble along in everyday life most of all.  Conversion as a constant, and dedicated baptism process of death and life.  Immersion in the Holy Spirit.  Identifying ourselves with Christ, and taking our identity in who we are in Christ.   But now later on in my journey, I am glad I took part in that particular rite of conversion, because it’s so rich in symbolism, in a continual kind of way, rather than as a one off experience, also.

 

 

Can we still experience the sacred in a secular world?  Ignation and Buddhist Perspectives – Facilitated by Terry Walsh SJ

7th February.

Text from the printed leaflet.  Quote:

“Fr Terry Walsh is a Jesuit priest and a philosopher. His curiosity about the roots of human experience – cognitive, ethical and religious – led him to the practice of Buddhist meditation at a time in 2007 when he was living among the Tibetans in exile in northern India. Since then he has returned to Asia every two years to teach philosophy and to continue the practice of meditation in monasteries in Thailand, Laos, and Sri Lanka. There he has discovered not an identity, but a valuable and enlightening correlation between the Buddhist concept of mindfulness and the Ignatian focus on the desires that compel the search for the divine as the interior realization of freedom.”

and:

“Do we believe that in the present state of secular culture marked by unbelief in God and indifference to religion it is still possible to experience the sacred? I believe experience of the sacred is attainable, but there are obstacles mostly of our own making that must be overcome. As the parable of the sower in Matthew’s Gospel suggests, it is possible to have ears and not hear, eyes and not see, hearts and not understand (Mt 13). The sacred might surround us and thoroughly penetrate our lives; yet we don’t perceive it.

Both Buddhism and Ignatian spirituality direct us to enter into ourselves, to search for traces of a hidden yet real dimension of the sacred within the fabric of mundane experience, which we unthinkingly dismiss as too ordinary or profane to contain the divine.

The workshop will explore how these two schools of spirituality offer concrete ways to achieve a freedom that arises once we have let go of preconceived notions of the sacred that blind us to its authentic presence and constrict our experience. We need to allow our minds and senses to grow accustomed to the darkness and emptiness of spirit, because this is where grace takes root and thrives. For whatever we think of the holy, it is not just another object in the world, there to be egotistically manipulated for personal satisfaction.”

For more information on the Mount Street Jesuit Centre, go to:

http://www.msjc.org.uk/

 

Photoshop Learning

There is so much to learn, and while I really should have picked up this little gem of knowledge before, I only recently found out the following!

Merge Layers – All layers that are selected are merged into a single layer

Merge visible – All layers that are not hidden will be merged into a single layer

Flatten Image – Will merge all layers and discard any layers that are hidden

Ah well, better late than never!

Holocaust Memorial Day 2015: Keeping the Memory Alive at the Council Chambers, Guildhall, Kingston on Sunday 1st February 2015

This was a very valuable event with lots of variety and different presentations by many people, including the Revd Andrew Williams who gave an excellent presentation on the visual arts in relation to the Holocaust.  I was very pleased to receive third prize in the 16+ category of the art competition which was part of the event.  The judging panel was made up of representatives from the Kingston Synagogues, the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, the Inter Faith Forum and the Volunteering Service at Kingston University.

How lovely it was to receive a prize, and a lovely one, at that, some gift vouchers to spend at a local art store.  So useful too!  I met some great  people, and was glad of the opportunity to spend time in reflection not only on the Holocaust, but on other genocides which have happened since, and to receive the sobering message that our intentions should be strengthened against the prejudice and fear which often starts such horrific processes festering, and adds fuel to the creation of such atrocities.

The plan is that over the coming weeks several local exhibitions will be mounted in order to display the work.

lasting stones of memory painting by jenny meehan for holocaust memorial day kingston

lasting stones of memory painting by jenny meehan for holocaust memorial day kingston

Above:  Lasting Stones of Memory – Painting by Jenny Meehan – Acrylic on Canvas Board

Tiny Bones

 

I trod on fragments of bone;

Homosexual, Jew and Gypsy.

Unknowingly desecrating

precious loved ones,

with my soles.

 

A heartless, human realisation –

I did not know, until the man told me.

When he spoke,

my world changed.

Brokenness took a new meaning.

Even the tiniest

prejudice

is a terrible thing.

 

I took one of the splinters –

pressed it

into my skin

and wept.

 

Jenny Meehan

3 – 22 February 2015

Society of Wood Engravers

I always go and see the exhibition at the Bankside Gallery by the Society of Wood Engravers, as I love it so much.  Here is the text which I quote from the website:

“The Society of Wood Engravers is the principal organisation and rallying point for those interested in the subject, and it also maintains a lively interest in other forms of relief printmaking. Essentially, it is an artists’ exhibiting society. There are about seventy members, practising artists who have been elected or invited to membership on merit.
An international exhibition drawn from an open submission of wood engravings and other forms of relief printmaking. In this show there will be over 130 original prints by elected SWE members and others, plus a special section spotlighting the work of Sarah van Niekerk and her great influence as a teacher of engraving. While the exhibition will comprise mainly of wood engravings other forms of relief print such as woodcut and linocut will also be on display”

Well, I saw it again this year, and it always delivers.  Something about black and white is very challenging, and very useful and important.  The combination of mark making variations, types, directions, characters, all give a lot.

 

Copyright Alert

A blog run by someone else has pinched one of my drawing images and has posted it up as their own work.   Just for the records, the image below is my work.  In this case it appears difficult to track down…mshahzis.blogspot.  But no way of contacting that I can see right now, anyway.   But for those that like to know what they are looking at…This pencil sketch is mine!

 

Leith Hill Surrey Pencil Sketch Jenny Meehan Contemporary British Artist surrey artist artwork for sale to buy affordable english romantic artist modern, tree trunk bench resting place,

This pencil sketch is by Jenny Meehan.
Copyright jenny meehan.

I’m not flattered when people do this.    Those that have respect, ask permission before using others work on their blogs and certainly provide clear credit and a link, so that there is no confusion.  For full information on copyright matters, see below.

Copyright Information – Jenny Meehan 

Copyright in all images by Jenny Meehan is held by the artist.
Permission must be sought in advance for the reproduction, copying or any other use of any images by Jenny Meehan. Individuals or businesses seeking licenses or permission to use, copy or reproduce any image by Jenny Meehan should, in the first instance, contact Jenny Meehan.
Any persons discovered to be reproducing, copying or using images by Jenny Meehan without prior consent, authorisation or permission will be put on notice that Jenny Meehan is the copyright owner and asked to immediately cease and desist the infringing activity. If a satisfactory response and / or compliance is not forthcoming promptly, the matter will be pursued. For clarification of the laws of copyright, please contact the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS). http://www.dacs.org.uk

Copyright for all visual art by Jenny Meehan is managed by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) in the UK. If you wish to licence a work of art by Jenny Meehan, please contact Jenny Meehan in the first instance to clarify your requirements.

Licencing an image is quick and easy for both parties and is organised through the Design and Artist Copyright Society. (Note, my images are not shown on the “Art image” selection on the Design and Artist Copyright “Art Image” page. This does NOT mean you cannot apply for a licence to use an image of my work from DACS… They simply have a very limited sample selection of work in their “Artimage” page!)

Also, please of course feel free to contact me if you are looking for a particular type of artwork image, as I have a large archive of images myself. I will also be able to let you know the maximum size the digital image is available at. If you then wish to licence the artwork image,  I would then refer you to  the Design and Artist Copyright Society to arrange the licencing agreement according to your requirements. Once paid and agreed, I then supply the high resolution image directly to you.

If you need any further clarification, the DACS website is clear and very helpful indeed, and they would be happy to help you.

DACS
Design and Artist Copyright Society
33 Old Bethnal Green Road
London E2 6AA
Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7336 8811
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7336 8822
email: info@dacs.org.uk
website: http://www.dacs.org.uk
Offices are open 0930 – 1700 Monday through Friday.

 

 

I am not sure if I have posted this up already.. Had a few problems once when writing a post, and got muddled with the different versions, so if this is a repeat, well.  Don’t worry, it’s me, not you, who has gone double!

 

Memo for June:  Baker Tilly in Guildford

Four of Jenny Meehan’s prints and four of her original paintings can be seen at Baker Tilly’s  offices in Guildford between July – September 2013. To make an appointment to view please contact Sue Dragon at Guildford Arts on
Email: gabt@guildfordarts.com or Phone: 01483 573 538

texture acrylic filler pigments, imaginative internal landscapes,memory based painting abstract expressionist, lyrical abstraction,romantict british art,romanticism expressionism 21st century,british uk female painter fine artist meehan,Cove - Jenny Meehan Acrylic Painting

Cove – Jenny Meehan Acrylic Painting
Very textural…which you cannot see too well here!

 

Above is “Cove”… I think childhood memory plays it’s part, once more, as it nearly always does!  I loved Combe Martin in North Devon, and there are wonderful rocks, crevices, caves, and other places of shelter.  The three little finger marks I placed near the end…I was thinking then of my  family members, both birth family and family now.  I think many people have treasured memories from their times by the sea…  I cannot imagine living somewhere without a coastline!    Cove is one of four paintings which will be on show at Baker Tilly in June

Artists Beware!  Amusement and Depression!

We simply don’t command what we are worth.  Well, maybe toned down a little into “It is easy to undervalue art working”.

This is the conclusion I have come to regarding art working in all its forms.

This article below, by Alistair Gentry is highly amusing, sobering, and maybe slightly depressing!

http://careersuicideblog.wordpress.com/2013/05/17/artist-opportunities-may-2013/

While amusingly extreme, it’s wise to take note of  what the situation often is…Not always, not necessarily so extreme, but  I have suspected much of this for a while.  I have very limited experience and Alistair Gentry has a lot.  So I do mark his words!

I think the “answer” is to simply make sure that what you do does work for you in the way you want it to.  Our reasons for doing things are many, and the bottom line is that the reason you ultimately choose to do something is because it means something to YOU.  How you go about getting it around, how you use  your skills, how you choose to invest your time and money…  Make your choices but whatever you do, don’t delude yourself that the substance of what you do is going to be realised in recognition, status,  or money.  It might be, but this is a side issue.   Put your heart into your art working and do it for the value it brings to your life and try to educate others as much as you can as to why art working is valuable, and exactly how it is.  Think  about it for a start… Why do you bother then?   How do you show this?  How do you talk about it?  What difference can it make to someone’s life?  Why does it matter?

“We simply don’t command what we are worth.”  Is me quoting myself!  I had better listen!

It is not rooted in a sense of self importance or inflated idea of the value of my own work, but more the conclusion I have come to through thinking about why art does matter in society and culture.   We have to have useful, transferable, competent skills and be willing to share them.  Useful, interesting, and thoughtfully reflective insights into the human condition which come from time invested into what is,  at it’s root, a contemplative practice.   And the value of the practice and it’s produce needs to be encouraged,  not exploited, by the way things work in the “art world”  (whatever that really is!).  I think it quite possibly nothing to do with art.  In my realistic moments I also conclude that business will always be business, and this is a ruthless and money minded matter.

I’ve resolved myself to continue to re-think and review what I do and why.  How I invest my time and money.  I’ve built up a bit of an exhibition history now, which can have it’s uses, but my heart is not in it.  As a trail or path in itself, it does not lead anywhere.  It is more what happens inside of us, and with our relationships and connections which matters, not some illusory idea of recognition or value based on ever shifting sand of whim, personal taste, or an idea or relative importance and value.   Only history holds the real answer to what ends up having stood the test of time, and even that is selective and not entirely reliable as a gauge of value, though it certainly indicates impact.  Many wonderful women have sadly been left out of the big art history trail!

On an optimistic note,  just to balance out the extreme despair that could easily assail one if only thinking down certain lines,   I have also  found that, as well as many rather dry experiences in my efforts to share my own work with others,  there are very many exciting, interesting and worthwhile artistic ventures happening.  People researching certain themes,  for example,  the wonderful “Speaking Out – Women Healing from the Trauma of Violence”  by Dr Nicole Fayard (University of Leicester 2014).  This project was a fantastic example of art working being explored in a very interesting and positive way, and for good end too,  raising awareness of trauma recovery and art,  bringing insight and information regarding social issues, sparking off discussion and establishing connections between people with common interests and passions.  Being part of that project has given me far more than I expected it to.  Not only has the process of working through some of my own tangled thoughts been  quite helpful,  but it has been inspiring and motivating to understand and recognise the value of art working in relation to trauma recovery, and this pushed me along a path I had started to walk on just that little bit further.

 

A Quote From “Going Slow” by Michael Sadgrove

“I am trying to learn, late in life, that the race is not always to the swift nor the battle to the strong.  Ours is an age where speed is everything.  Wherever you turn, in business, in industry, in education, even in the church, success is measured by this: that you fill your diary, work every hour God sends, work both smart and fast.  When I was in Sheffield and trying to raise funds for the Cathedral, I asked a wealthy businessman to help.  As he wrote out the cheque, he said to me: ‘Michael, it’s really important that the church models something different from the hectic pace at which we in the public and private sectors expect to see results.  The cathedral has been here for centuries. It has a perspective sub specie aeternitatis: it looks at things from the vantage point of eternity. It can help us take the long view, learn the meaning of patience.’  Perhaps this is what St Benedict meant by stability in his rule for monks: not running feverishly from place to place either physically or metaphorically, but being committed to the present where God has placed us, living according to that long view. ”

The above extract is from “Going Slow” a sermon preached by Michael Sadgrove on 10th February 2013 http://www.durhamcathedral.co.uk/worshipandmusic/sermon-archive/going-slow  for the whole sermon, which is a good read.

As someone who often, for some odd reason, sometimes makes life much harder than it needs to be by overreaching, in terms of giving myself unrealistic targets, the sermon “Going Slow” is a timely reminder that a hectic pace is not the way I want to live my life deep down, and not the way to position myself to my best advantage I don’t think either.   Thankfully I tend to recognise fairly quickly when I make my schedule unrealistic, and manage to adjust things accordingly by making a reassessment of priorities…it hasn’t got me into any trouble yet and I hope will not in the future, but it has caused me unnecessary stress at times.   I think that one of the reasons I find the contemplative way of life a great aspiration and the way forward for me is probably in that it counteracts my natural tendency to associate achievement and doing with being worthwhile as a person.  I continue to shake this delusion off, and it will be a long term task, I am certain!

Good Article on Oil Paints and Acrylic Paints http://www.goldenpaints.com/justpaint/jp12article1.php

This article on Oil and Acrylic Paints is one of the most thorough I have come across, and I do just love my paint research.  I have such an interest in it, I know for sure I am obsessed with paint, because it defies all reason.  I could quite happily spend an hour a day reading about technical matters regarding the use and qualities of different paints.  Well, there have been some days when I have done this…  Finding an in depth article like this one from Golden Paints “Just Paint” publication does save a lot of time though, so I hope it is useful to you if your interests lie in that direction!   If not, there is no doubt something else that you would happily spend an hour reading about!

 

Clyde Hopkins’ Paintings Continued…

I used to love getting plasticine and putting all the colours together, then slicing through them.  Clyde Hopkins’ paintings make me think of this memory, and so comes another of those internal connections that draw us one way or another when we look at paintings which excite us more than some others. “About the Orinoco” 2013   Oil on linen 105 x 90 cm

Copyright Clyde Hopkins.  Permission to use has been granted by the artist.

Oh, this one, yes.  This may be my favourite.  ( I can see my plasticine cut well).  What is more, there is an egg which lies waiting underneath the ground.  I am slightly concerned at this point that my comments and response are rather simplistic.  However, who cares but me, and only for a moment. Plus, this is probably a good thing.  My logical and intellectual  brain, while useful, sometimes robs me of a lot of pleasure. I love allusions to growth and the organic, and find them here in this painting, with a sense of being below ground level, which is also something which has held an interest to me for many years.  It was the only part of geography I enjoyed…rock formations, glaciers, volcanoes, different types of layers on the earth’s surface.  All so much better than towns, houses and populations.

“The Orinoco is one of the longest rivers in South America at 2,140 km (1,330 mi). Its drainage basin, sometimes called the Orinoquia, covers 880,000 square kilometres (340,000 sq mi).”

There you are.  Your intellect is now satisfied a little.   There is certainly a feeling of drainage in the painting.  And of forest.  And of roots. It’s kind of odd, that part in the painting at the near top right, with it’s concentric circles rippling together, bringing it away from the flat surface into a space beyond the picture plane.  But it doesn’t disturb me, and I think there is a patch of what I will call  “mystic light” just where those light purple/lilac seed type patches are falling.    So there is movement, light, and what looks like  a fair amount of texture in the bottom right hand side of the painting (looking face on).  Those things build an area which has pulled away from  the flatness of the strata/cross section side, and so, all does look in accord.  It works.  The computer screen will be playing its part in distorting what the reality of the reflected light is,  and so I am feeling  deprived.  But something like that is happening.

It’s a joyous painting, and seeps a sense of experience, and experienced use of colour, which is delightful to me.  I like organic forms in paintings and while I can appreciate paintings of geometric composition, and can imagine the freedom to explore various colours and paint applications within them, my eyes need the relief of a bit of undulation!   I like paintings which are a pleasure to the eye…No shame in that.   But ones which also challenge and stimulate.  These paintings do all three, and, like all paintings, all kinds of other things which we have not a clue about, no doubt. I want to look at some more in future posts. On the “Will Do” list!

 

Signs of  The Times

I hold a preference for  strictly geometric designs just being printed and flat.  And no more.  I found this out through my own “Signs of the Times” series.  I was thinking about maybe  translating some of them into paint, but couldn’t really conjure up the will to tear them away from their printed expressions, which were far truer to my intentions at the outset.  Behind each one,  there stood the thought that I had started working on them because I was sick to the core of advertising… sick of seeing all around me images which had the sole intention of pointing out some need and proposing the answer to it, all for commercial and business gain.  And so I took the sign part seriously.  I wondered how the world would look with, instead of adverts for products and services everywhere, it had simple statements of being or small phrases which simply hit you with no ulterior motive.  Things like “Quick Dip”  and “Putting Your Point Across” just expressed with no more message than that.  No more meaning or intent than the fruit of me grappling with how best I could express inner movements of the mind and heart.  Simple symbolic communication, which one could respond to without pressure.  You could emotionally agree, or not.   Simple as that.  Inner experiencing.  No demands.  No pointing out of anything you may be lacking, may need, should have etc. etc.

So I like the simple and the straightforward, and I like geometric design and paint encountering it.  I like them apart and I like them together.  But in my own painting I want the challenge of the relationship between the geometric and the organic/lyrical.   There is something which is more “giving” about it.  My mind just doesn’t respond to straight lines that well, maybe.  It is interesting for me to take note of others work and I don’t have the time to put everything which strikes a chord in this Journal, but hopefully I will have some trace over time, of things which have helped me to discern my own creative path.  It is though recognising something you like in others work that you get some sense of what your inner interests might be.   I think it possible that seeing what you like around you, you see it with eyes fresher than you could have for your own work and that this can encourage you and validate the little stirrings which you are starting to feel inside yourself.  I still remember wandering round some art fair (I cannot remember which it was) and finding my eyes only resting on Ivon Hitchens’ and Alan Davie’s paintings…everything else just seems to sink into the abyss!  It was their painting alone which caught me completely…  Nothing else seemed significant. We search for significant form, and I don’t mean significant form in the Bell sense, but in the poetic.  Something which calls back to us, like an echo, of what resounds within.

Back to the “Signs of the Times”… Here is another one which will be on show at Baker Tilly this year… Title is “No Cares”

No Cares print from Signs of the Times series by Jenny Meehan

No Cares print from Signs of the Times series by Jenny Meehan

 

Chance Encounter on the South bank with Nigel Fountain interviewing for  “The Oldie”

As I make my way back from my psychotherapy session I often stop to sit by the Thames.  Anywhere by water is my favourite place in London.  I have rather “a thing” about water… and find myself drawn to it in both in the ways it is used symbolically,  and as a real substance.  I’ve always loved water…Been a bit of a “water baby”!    I had only been sitting down for a short while when a man approached me, explaining that he was from “The Oldie” Magazine, and asking “Would I be willing to be interviewed?”  Well, I had, as it happens, heard of  The Oldie Magazine, but only because a writer  who brought “London Downpour” from me last year happened to be attending one of their events in London, and I needed to drop the painting off there for collection.   This was just as well, as I don’t think I would have said  yes if I had  not recognised the name of the magazine.

Nigel Fountain…What a great name… For me to be interviewed by Nigel Fountain on the edge of the Thames, and to have the painting “London Downpour” connected in my mind with The Oldie Magazine, is something which makes my heart smile a little… I am a great believer in taking the time both to talk and to listen, and so this was handy for him, as I gave him a great deal of my time.  It was so nice to be interviewed by someone so good at doing it well, and I feel very grateful for the opportunity to share some of my life experiences with him.  I was very open about my life experiences, which I am not always… but I follow my instincts in matters such as these, and I feel in a place myself where the traumatic nature of quite a lot of my earlier life really does seem a very long way away.  Though I work through some of the issues in psychotherapy/psychoanalysis,  the fact that I have been able to work my way through them is starting to pay dividends in my ability to talk about them in a reflective and thought out way.  It helps me to appreciate other people too.

Surprisingly, I find,  engaging in psychotherapy  is not a selfish endeavour.  It is self focused,  but time invested in listening to one’s self is probably something we should all do a great deal more of.   Being able to see yourself compassionately yet also critically, in a constructive way,  can be also a way to allow more compassion into your heart when looking at other people’s life experiences.    Why do we shy away from others pain and suffering?  Why do we fear the vulnerability in each other, and make so many efforts to hide our common tears?  Maybe because we have not faced our own pains and sorrows?

I am writing this now very deliberately having not seen yet what Nigel Fountain has written!  This is important to me because as a writer myself, I am interested to see how what I write now relates to what he writes when I get hold of it  in just over a month (today as I write this   is 22nd March). It is rather risky to talk very freely to journalists.  Having had three other local paper journalists write articles on me over the last few years,   I am very aware indeed of how their individual perspectives colour their work.  You trust them to re form what you give them, and  you do not know if their own distortions, which are bound to be there, are going to give a likeness which you feel ok about.   But I was so impressed with his interview technique I am quite confident he will do an excellent job, and if I don’t like it, it is his work, not mine.

I also really like the whole idea of what he does…Going around and interviewing random people…listening to their stories and making a piece of writing out of them.   These chance encounters happen to us all the time in life.  Just investing that little bit more time to find out about someone and to somehow allow them to open up a little more than they might do in a rushed interaction.  Making time to make a connection with someone else, simply by showing an interest.    It is much easier to flick on your mobile phone or tablet and interact with that.  How many opportunities to communicate will our gadgets and technology close down for us, I wonder?

Note:  Since writing the above, the article has been published, and it is a most excellent piece of writing.  I am delighted, and it is by far the most accomplished piece of writing about me I have experienced so far.    I feel rather privileged to have met the man and been interviewed, and also to have his writing skill used in sketching an impression of my life with such a perceptive and acute penning!  My most favourite bit…Will need to do a painting in response to it, I think:

“I contemplate the north bank of the Thames and Jenny, scratching her chin, avoids looking born-again”  Quote from “Brief Encounters – Nigel Fountain looks at the lives of others” published in The Oldie magazine, June, 2014

I looked into “The Oldie” which has been described as the spiritual successor to Punch and was set up in 1992 by Richard Ingrams.  It’s aim was ” to “produce an antidote to youth culture but, more importantly, a magazine with emphasis on good writing, humour and quality illustration.”   I want to get hold of a copy now, this sounds very good!   This quote in particular about The Oldie is very enticing: “The most original magazine in the country…..their eclectic embrace of human variety is a monthly rebuke to the formulaic, celebrity led concept of features in our newspapers and magazines.”  The Independent. http://www.the.oldie.magazine.co.uk/about_us/

St Julian of Norwich/The Comforter Painting

Researching Julian of Norwich a while back  led me to the final title of the painting below, which was first called “The Comforter” referencing Christ’s words regarding the Holy Spirit in the New Testament books of John: “Nevertheless I tell you the truth; It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you.”  I then expanded the title to include the reference to St Julian of Norwich, because my research and thinking, along with the writing of the poem, made me feel that the two works, though in different mediums, were one.

Acrylic, various fillers, acrylic mediums and pigments, and glass beads , sacred art painting religious, spiritual visionary painting, christ centred poetic visual art, The Comforter/St Julian - Jenny Meehan

The Comforter/St Julian – Jenny Meehan
Acrylic, various fillers, acrylic mediums and pigments, and glass beads

Above “The Comforter/St Julian of Norwich”  Painting by Jenny Meehan  

I entered this in the Womens’ Interfaith Network exhibition submission process this year, but it did not get in,  so I am taking this opportunity to show it for now!   I would also like to include the poem I wrote in response to my studies of St Julian of Norwich and also another poem which I found later on by someone called Venetia Carse.

Firstly then, my poem on St Julian of Norwich, which is called “To Saint Julian”

To Saint Julian

 

I had not heard of you,

I had not seen you

Within your four walls

The small rectangle looks out

 

You look within

The walls of your cell rough marked and mottled

Play with the light which moving across the day

Casts itself into interplay with your mind and thinking

On the source of our reason to live

Our reason to live, even within the pain

The darkness we fear around us

Theblackness we all must face when

Forced into our own heart cell

The confines of our place.

 

It is not the now, the then, the will be

It is all three in one small speck

Which running down, splatters, splinters the hardness

Catastrophe brought us a gift in one falling

One who was God, and also was man

And woman? Is this so? If so,my heart cries childishly

For that warm embrace.

the hug, and the softness

The cover, white on your arm , ready to wrap round me.

 

I need the way forward.

In the indistinct marks of the wall which surrounds me

gentle ring, containing all which first took joy

Fear which raged spitting brimstones not from

another world, but from ours

iface the trauma

Know the grief, see the hurt, in the living of life

Is a heart of pain.

Being  wounded is not hard.

All enter into  our own cell.

 

How far I have fallen!

Yet, there is the always the holding.

You are holding,

You circle me.

Containment  of our being.

Able to be as  we are in you.

And not despised.

Light changes, it changes everything

Every image alters,

In the light.

I look back to you , St Julian, in the refuge you took

Because life is not easy.

“All is well”  your voice comes to me

Not as platitude, nor  peace,

Rather as hope, because His love is better than life

We look beyond, look through, and look within.

Our search is not in vain.

life hits hard each tender soul that struggles forward,

Clothed in the flesh that does not cover

Our multitude of sins.

see the blows of life on our bodies

But see too

God’s covering.

Within the blood of my new birth

“All IS well”

 

 

And the poem by Venetia Carse:

 

Let me live beyond the limits of my Self,

still in the ‘now’, yet on the edge of time;

eye looking inward, forward, down and through,

seeing always God’s radiance coloured

in the mist, rime, blackthorn, shine.

 

Let me live where Christ, my faith, begins,

where love, confronting fear,

holds candle to the dark;

rejection, rape – bitterness and pain

by this most holy Cross

so forgivingly redeemed.

Should we be asked to travel some dark road,

bruised, disillusioned, life meaningless,

it seems,

may openness to God’s all-giving

grace guide our blind eyes … through.

 

 

And shall we see once more

and sense the joy

in small and patient things;

soft mist, sun warmth

and blackthorn bud;

or glory in a cloud of swallows wings.

Then let us cease to strive

beyond ourselves and live,

content to be, aware

of God’s compassion … and His Love, which sets us free’

with prayer and reverence prepared

to care for Earth’s sad frailty.

 

Venetia Carse – A POEM inspired by Dame Julian of Norwich.   This was published in one of the Julian Magazines, but I cannot remember which one, so apologies for the vague source reference.  I normally ensure I give publication details, but this is the best I can do for this one, for now. 

 

Poetry and Painting

I will post up some of my recent work very soon.  I am enjoying writing some more poetry right now, and also experimenting with painting in response to the poetry.  This seems to be a fitting approach…I feel released from the need to define objects or have explicit pictorial content in the painting,  as can rest, relaxed and chilled, that I have said what I want to say (in language) in the poem.  I can then simply express in visual language the feeling with no obligation to define anything more than my instincts are leading me to.  This is great fun!    I still enjoy painting pictures, and I still enjoy drawing from life, and I still enjoy paintings which have a recognisable subject matter, but I do not feel bound by this.  What  I am doing with my painting is sticking to the heart of what I enjoy the most about it, which is creating significant emotional form, and experimenting with materials, techniques, colours and composition.    I don’t need to do any more than this in one painting.  Drawing IS fundamentally important.  I love it dearly.  Sometimes it meets the painting and sometimes it doesn’t.  I don’t have to prove a thing, just paint.   If someone sees my painting and thinks I cannot draw, so be it.  Not my problem!  (Gosh, I do angst over this matter, again and again!)

I think I probably just need to sit down, look at the strands in my work, identify them and develop them.  At present I have:

Spiritual, poetic, personal painting type work.  Experimenting with the relationships between image and word.  An interest in the spiritual direction and creativity interface, mental health and well being, and trauma recovery.  Using the psychoanalytic approach generally to increase self awareness in my own life and work, and the extremely delightful, wonderful liberating experience of living a life which is as Christ-centred as I can possible make it.

Drawings (mostly life drawing), which I would like to take into painting also.  Just started going along to the Dulwich Art Group about once a month.  Very exciting to paint the figure from life.  Colour, if used will be expressionistic.  Black and white is more appealing initially, as it is the marks I am interested in right now.

Rambling, on this blog.  On and on and on and on.  As long as I can.  Free to do, because of the joy of skimming over the surface, which we are all very good at.  I write, I like to write.  Poet seems too grand a word, but I lean into that direction rather than other genres.  Writing this journal is an indulgence.

An interest in producing and developing/marketing a commercial strand, but one which I still feel has roots I can feel at least a little bit connected to.  This might happen later, as my time is tight with household and family matters.  I make little attempts here and there, but the reality is, other things are more important right now.

A photographic strand, which has completely become black and white, and small, rather than big, both in terms of print size and time spent on it.   I really need to put all my images from the past to good use… I have a lot of work I could use potentially.

And other things too…  I expect.

 

 

Excellent article by Mark Stone at Abstract Critical…

http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-rise-and-rise-of-the-modernist-artist/#comment-457271

A possible response might be … Sort out why you are doing what you are doing for yourself.

 

 

Jenny Meehan is a painter and designer based in East Surrey/South West London. Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also offers occasional  art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details.  

Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings and other artwork forms (prices ranging from between £60 and £700) and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase. Enquiries welcome.  I have more artwork than I can display on the internet, so let me know if you are looking for something specific in terms of style, function, or subject matter. 

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom.  To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s bi-annual  mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date. Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way.

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery: http://www.photoboxgallery.com/19507

 

Geometric Abstract Design Painting in Progress Images

Just working on a geometric abstract design painting for All Glass in Paisley.  Enjoying the experience of using past experiments with textures in a rather more structured way.  I have always delighted in John Tunnard’s paintings and it is certainly interesting working with such a sense of order with both colour, texture and space.  It doesn’t feel too restrictive, there are still plenty of decisions to be made along the way, even though not one gestural mark in sight…Well, a tiny little bit to add variation to some of the areas but nothing that stands out and shouts “Look at Me!”  One of the most interesting parts of this project is translating the design, which was organised using vector graphics, and letting it take a new form in the material of the painting.  There’s no point in trying to copy from one medium to another, as the materials dictate their own directions and there is a need to be flexible and open to change.   This makes what could seem a rather laborious and unrewarding task unexpectedly interesting.

Here are some images of the work in progress:

Geometric  Non Objective Abstract Painting in Progress by Jenny Meehan, john tunnard influenced abstract painting by female British contemporary 21st century female painter designer jenny meehan,english modern painting influence,romantic abstraction geometric acrylic,glass texture surface abstraction, experimental exploratory painter visual artist from britain,jamartlondon,blues purple white grey black coloured painting abstract,

Geometric Non Objective Abstract Painting in Progress by Jenny Meehan

Messy edges everywhere, but while I am still working out the various surfaces, adjusting colours and generally playing around, there is no point making everything tidy at this stage.    I think I will also move away from a totally clinical look even in the final stages, with variations and imperfections playing their own part, though the black and grey areas will be knife-edged, I think.  (The colours are now quite different!  I have done a fair bit since inserting these images in the blog, but will put some more up in the next entry!)

I’ve got an idea now of what I will do with the existing ideas for colour, and also where to take the different areas to in order to create some interesting relationships…  Not sure about the hessian, even when colour is changed, so that may be coming off…  Though very different, diametrically opposite even, from how I was starting my paintings last year, I am enjoying the change in approach, though I don’t see myself sticking to this completely  pre-defined starting point/structure, unless I was working very large, in which case it would be wise.   I  think the process of navigating a way forward probably does come from pushing ahead one way, then reacting in another direction, then melding, then continuing…testing…. Maybe with repetition, deviation and hesitation! And always with reflecting, meditating, responding, analysing and generally waiting for paint to dry.

I am currently beginning to find that the combination of continuing with the reflective and analytical practice of both personal psychotherapy tied in with my faith journey as a Christian is providing many wells of potential directions for my painting, poetry and other work with imagery.  As always, I seek focus through reflection, and seek insight and wisdom as to decisions connected to my paintings and other work.

The Archive of Failure…

How could I resist not getting involved in this interesting project?  !!!!

We all know what it means to fail…

Aaron Head has put together “The Archive of Failure” which I am sure will be amusing and interesting view.

I won’t post mine up right now, as I don’t want to spoil the impact of the publication, but I cannot wait to see the other images included in “The Archive of Failure”

http://archiveoffailure.com/

Thinking about failure, I failed to get my submission of artwork into the Urban Dialogues Exhibition this year.  It’s always worth enquiring as to how many submissions were received and how many artworks were selected.  I did enquire and this was the result:  “This year we received 255 submission of artwork, of that yours was shortlisted to the final 30. In the end we had to settle on 20 artists to show.”     Ahhh, so close and yet so far.   Though it is disappointing not to be able to show something, and the application process and pulling the work together all takes time, I guess I can be pleased to have been among the final 30.  This is the value of asking, because it is too easy to get demoralised when you enter things and don’t get selected.   I really like the Urban Dialogues purpose/project and don’t think this failure will put me off making the effort to enter something next year.  I went along to the  women’s event at the Red Gallery this week and had a  good chance to see the exhibition then.  The best part of my visit was seeing “The Fury Project”.  The discussion was good, but too short, which is a shame because the panel were all very interesting women in their own right and it would have been good to hear more from both them and the other women there.  A “red herring” was thrown in at one point, and this unfortunately did the usual thing that red herrings do…plummet the direction of an interesting debate into the abyss…   It happens so easily and so quickly.  But there was a lot of very good reflection and opinion in the main. Details of the Panel:

Discussion Panel: FEMINIST ACTION – ON THE RIGHT TRACK?
Chaired by BBC Correspondent RAZIA IQBAL
With:
LAURA BATES – Everyday Sexism Project
JULIE SADDIQI – Islamic Society of Britain
DR ALTHEA LEGAL-MILLER – King’s College London
Jacqueline Nicholls – Artist

Pallant House Gallery, Chichester

I am very fond of Pallant House Gallery in Chichester, and normally make a visit there when I am in that neck of the woods, which is usually when I am doing some course or other at West Dean College in Chichester.  Rather short of money for attending courses at the present time, and so I won’t be making a trip to Chichester or West Dean for some time…Maybe I will need to give this exhibition of Eric Ravilious  woodcuts, lithographs and blocks a miss, which is a great shame as I LOVE his work.  The blurb for the Ravilious Prints Exhibition taken from the Pallant House Gallery website  is quoted below:

“Our new autumn season kicks off this month with an eclectic array of openings and events, starting with an exhibition of the celebrated painter, designer, book illustrator and wood engraver, Eric Ravilious (1903 – 42). One of Britain’s most popular and versatile artists, Ravilious produced distinctive watercolours, lithographs, and graphics in the 1930s for companies such as London Transport and ceramics for Wedgwood which are hugely evocative of the era. The exhibition, runs from 8 October – 8 December 2013 in the De’Longhi Print Room and includes woodcuts, lithographs and blocks by the artist.”

Eric Ravilious produced a huge amount of high quality work over his busy life, and I get great pleasure from looking and reflecting on his amazing craftsmanship.

Grayson Perry Playing to the Gallery 2013 Democracy Has Bad Taste – The Reith Lectures

The best part of my day today  (16/10/2013) was listening to this!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b03969vt/The_Reith_Lectures_Grayson_Perry_Playing_to_the_Gallery_2013_Democracy_Has_Bad_Taste/

Brixton Drawing Project

I love walking around London and spend a fair bit of time exploring, so you can imagine how pleased I was to stumble into Brixton East, 100 Barrington Road, Brixton, SW9 on Sunday to find a beautiful and interesting space, lots of paper, charcoal, pencils, etc, and people drawing, relaxing music, an amazing lavatorium (this is my playful name for a toilet, loo, restroom, etc), and a very nice cup of tea.  (Thank you so much for that! It inspired my artworking!)   I found out that the Brixton Drawing Project, (now in it’s third year, I think) is a week long event and started on the 1st of October, so I felt fortunate to have made it there by accident.   I also bumped into an old friend, unexpectedly, which was lovely and she kindly gave me a home made pastel.  This may not seem very exciting to many, but home-made art materials always go down very well with me; I love using them and I was most grateful for it.    It is wobbly and distorted and full of natural and individual charm…Just like the most interesting people in life!

The Brixton Drawing Project managed to get funded this time around through crowd funding, which is fantastic and meant that they did not need to charge people for taking part.  I feel strongly this is a very important kind of facility and activity to exist, as it connects people, all people…Not just those who might label themselves “artists”, but anyone who may like to play…Play with markmaking, responding, seeing.   Spend time observing, looking, interpreting.  Drawing is a natural and essential activity, I think, and it’s wonderful to have been able to share in the Brixton Drawing Project in a small way.  They held an exhibition of the work carried out on Sunday from 7pm  (mine included) and it was rich in variety, a real delight to see.  Though I didn’t attend from 7pm onwards, there was a lot of the drawing up ready for the exhibition on the walls when I came earlier on in the day, and so I got to see quite a bit of it.  Here are my image of the Brixton Drawing Project when I was there…

Brixton Drawing Project - Jenny Meehan at Brixton East.  My offering, in charcoal.  There is a small figure standing in the realm of a markmaking landscape.  jenny meehan markmaking drawing experimental exploratory,romantic landscape with moon

Brixton Drawing Project – Jenny Meehan at Brixton East. My offering, in charcoal. There is a small figure standing in the realm of a markmaking landscape!

jenny meehan brixton east,brixton drawing project, drawbrixton image

jenny meehan brixton east,brixton drawing project, drawbrixton image

jenny meehan brixton east,brixton drawing project, drawbrixton image

jenny meehan brixton east,brixton drawing project, drawbrixton image

jenny meehan brixton east,brixton drawing project, drawbrixton image

jenny meehan brixton east,brixton drawing project, drawbrixton image

Kingston Arts Salon

Quite a sociable time at the moment, and it was great to view the KAOS (Kingston Artist’s Open Studios) exhibition once more at the Cafe at Court Farm Garden Centre in Worcester Park during the Kingston Arts Salon Networking event.  I think it is very valuable and important for creative practitioners of all varieties, be they into music, writing,  visual arts, drama, dance, etc to mix, because we are engaged in the same wonderful creative adventure, in different forms…These forms can relate in so many interesting ways, and we can learn so much from eachother.

%d bloggers like this: