The Story So Far
1 — 21 Jul 2015 at W3 Gallery in London, United Kingdom

Very quick post, for me, especially, but as this is happening now probably best to throw it out there …

Information about “The Story So Far currently showing in Acton, with two of my photographic artworks included:

http://wsimag.com/art/16449-the-story-so-far

 

http://wsimag.com/art/16449-the-story-so-far… Wall Street International Art section…

Oh that is a first for me, to have something in an American publication.. but note the image they show is actually called “Snow White”… as below…

work information for my art at The Story So Far…
Name Of Artist Jenny Meehan
Title Of Work, “Snow White” 2015
Medium Of Work Photographic print on metallic paper.
“Snow White” is an image which evokes feelings of a dreamlike imaginative existence.. The girl, dressed as Snow White, through dramatic play, makes this idea of herself become a reality, in her own imagination. Stories enable us to experiment and imagine.
Price: £100

jenny meehan jamartlondon photo black white

jenny meehan jamartlondon photo black white

snow white by jenny meehan, The Story So Far 1 — 21 Jul 2015 at W3 Gallery in London, United Kingdom

snow white image by jenny meehan The Story So Far
1 — 21 Jul 2015 at W3 Gallery in London, United Kingdom

 

I have shown both the black and white and colour version, the colour version is part of “The Story so Far” exhibition.

Also on show at “The Story so Far”:

 

Name Of Artist Jenny Meehan
Title Of Work, “I Cannot Turn the Page- version 2” 2014
Medium Of Work Ink jet print on bond paper, folded.
“I Cannot Turn the Page – version 2” Is one version of a series of work exploring recovery from childhood trauma. In this image you see the witch in the Snow White fairy tale on the pages of the book, yet the real witch, or source of evil, looks down on the main subject, the frightened child.
Price: £100

I cannot turn the page version 2 by jenny meehan,The Story So Far 1 — 21 Jul 2015 at W3 Gallery in London, United Kingdom

I cannot turn the page version 2 by jenny meehan,The Story So Far
1 — 21 Jul 2015 at W3 Gallery in London, United Kingdom

Information on the show which is running at the mo:

The Story So Far
1 — 21 Jul 2015 at W3 Gallery in London, United Kingdom

Ann Philippas , The First Witness
The Arts Council funded ‘The Story So Far’ is creating an ‘arts & story trail’ from one end of Ealing to the other. The library anchors have been linked via a range of engaging activities, commissions and exhibits in literary and visual arts. The aim is to increase library and cultural activity engagement through the themes of sharing core stories and giving life to books. It initiates the first partnership between the Council, libraries, Cultural Community Solutions, Acton Arts Forum, the local arts sector and artists.
‘The Story So Far’ has the overarching themes of giving life to books by using different art forms, interpreting story themes and sharing stories across communities such as creation stories. The project is fostering greater engagement of arts and culture through the high-profile programme of activities and exhibits of visual and literary arts. It is developing the arts in Ealing by fostering partnerships between artists, arts organisations and libraries. We are supporting opportunities for artists to create and share new work, and widening audiences for the arts in Ealing through new venues and contexts.
Artistic expression interpreting the literary theme includes artwork on themes rooted in stories, myths, folklore and other literary inspiration. The artwork has been created in medium ranging through painting, performance, video, audio, text, photography, sculpture, drawing and more.
Participating artists: Tanya Loi, Jo Cheung, Katerina Sidorova, Jane Webb, Jenny Meehan, Tony Rickaby, Nick Cash, Emily Lazerwitz, Leanna Moran, Ben Walker, Martin Lau, Sam Welton, Wendy Charlton, Natalia Skobeeva, Matt Valentine, Ingrid Ung, Emma Finch, Heidi Jukes, Linda Haysman, Nicholas Vaughan, Dawes Gray, Myrto Karanika & Jeremy Keenan, Ann Philippas, Luke Haenlein, Anna Fafaliou, Marcella Reardon.
W3 Gallery
185 High Street, Acton
London W3 9DJ United Kingdom
Ph. +44 (0)20 89936158
w3actongallery@gmail.com
http://www.w3gallery.org.uk
Opening hours
Tuesday – Saturday from 11am to 7pm
Sunday from 2pm to 5pm

Jenny Meehan – www.jamartlondon.com
Human experience, emotion, and my own personal life journey form the centre of my work. The brokenness of human experience fascinates me, as well as the potential for growth and renewal. I trained as an artist through the short course programme at West Dean College and through adult education provision, and have an ongoing interest in the relationships between visual art and writing, fostered through a BA Honours in Literature. I’m based in Chessington, Surrey, and exhibit widely across the UK.

 

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION

Copyright in all images by Jenny Meehan is held by the artist.
Permission must be sought in advance if you wish to use images by Jenny Meehan. In the first instance, please contact Jenny Meehan. Copyright for all works of art by Jenny Meehan is managed by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) in the UK.

If you wish to licence a work of art by Jenny Meehan, please contact DACS as indicated below:
Design and Artist Copyright Society
33 Old Bethnal Green Road
London E2 6A3A
Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7336 8811

Fax: +44 (0) 20 7336 8822
email: info@dacs.org.uk
website: http://www.dacs.org.uk
Offices are open 0930 – 1700 Monday through Friday.

Thelma Continues

My work on “Thelma” continues.  I have settled with “Thelma” as a way of labelling this work, as the work isn’t just one sculpture, but the whole process…Thelma is the name of the life model, and as I did work from her body, it seems right to honour that by keeping her name.  It is also useful, as Thelma has been lots of things…from a female Bishop (hooray!) to a water goddess… So she is constantly changing.  It’s great… To have found this central form, and to work in a focused way on it, is very beneficial to me right now.  Having had only peeps of the human figure in my paintings  (though it has slipped in; sometimes I have painted over it!), now the female form seems to have arrived, and brown modelling wax is fantastic!  Fantastic to work with.  I love it.

The image here is one which was taken shortly before I had a mould made…  Not all the areas which I filled in are filled in at this point, but mostly.

Der Trommler Michael Sandle  rock drillJacob Epstein, thelma jenny meehan, brown modelling wax human female figure sculpture, war recovery,  near to mould making stage

thelma near to mould making stage

It’s rather rough and untidy…I did continue for a while, but annoyingly cannot find the images which I think I took right before the mould was made!   I will look again.  Her head developed considerably from the one shown above.  Now, at a much later stage, having cast a plaster version, it is very helpful for me to have these earlier image, as I can have them to hand while I further develop the sculpture into different directions.

Here is an image of the back now, in plaster…

jenny meehan sculpture female form, thelma rear view plaster pour

thelma rear view plaster pour

I sense that this is just the beginning of a longer project… And I am interested in how these experiments will relate to my painting, because I am sure they will.  I am struck by how passionate I feel about using both the wax and the plaster.  I am relieved to find more of a focus in terms of subject matter. Plaster is amazing… powder, liquid and solid!  It’s about change…Metamorphosis!   It can take on many forms.  The process of solidification is an exothermic one.  How wonderful to have warmth coming from something which looks so cold!  It releases heat that you can feel during the hardening process. It is hot and cold, dry and wet, liquid and solid. Transformation. Alchemy!  The brown modelling wax is wonderful too!  It’s soft and sticky as it warms against your body heat.

I nearly fell over with surprise on a recent visit to Tate Britain,  for I discovered “Der Trommler” by Michael Sandle.  In the harsh, dark and armoured form, deathly ribs beneath, huge, dark, warlike form; Death, death, death, beat in the silent drum.  Heavy mark.  Wow, what a work.  The dark heavy bronze perfect, in weighty darkness too!  Here it is:

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/sandle-der-trommler-t04941

Michael Sandle ‘Der Trommler’, 1985, cast 1987<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
© Michael Sandle

© Michael Sandle

This image is copyright Michael Sandle and was copied and pasted from the Tate website.    I include it here under the terms of fair usage as I need to include it for the purpose of commentary and its use is non-commercial. I have no idea how to contact Michael Sandle for copyright permission directly, but would if I could! (I would actually want to ask an awful lot more than that, as I cannot find much information about “Der Trommler” by Michael Sandle.  I would like to know how it came to be from start to finish!  See my notes on “fair use” at the bottom of this post.  

Straight ran my mind to my black wax woman, and then, I wondered, if she might be, while weak with her broken right arm (of power) some different kind of related figure.  She too has bands, which lie heavy on her frame, but hers, (while I thought when making her), may be defensive, were rather binding and holding type bands, and with their curls, in particular, may be more life-linked and more promising than just armour.  She is now more developed still, and will continue.  She is not as curly as she was, with much more weight having been added, but it is interesting to be reminded:

thelma, early stage jenny meehan

thelma, early stage jenny meehan

Here she was, in her third day… With all the playing with the armature, and though very abstract, she was very carefully measured.  I considered the space as well as the substance of her form, so where there is no material, I still felt the form to be there.  I was very much caught with the idea of flowing water.  So the plaster has done with itself what I tried to do with some paint when experimenting;

thelma front paint view jenny meehan

thelma front paint view jenny meehan

There is something a little more war-like about this ant-headed version, I think!

And the Female Bishop was also a force to be reckoned with!

sculpture celebrating the ordination of women bishops jenny meehan

sculpture celebrating the ordination of women bishops jenny meehan

thelma pulling jenny meehan

thelma pulling jenny meehan

There’s quite a lot of strength, and this version got me thinking very much of wading through deep water, which is something I will develop.  From water coming from above to deep water!  This really is going to give me a lot of room for experimentation!  I wanted to get it cast in bronze but I don’t have the money, as it would cost a few hundred pounds, which is out of my depth, right now!

Thelma’s breasts have changed…Initially they were like this:

thelma breasts wax sculpture jenny meehan

thelma breasts wax sculpture jenny meehan

I was talking to a lady on the course who had had a mastectomy…This must have seeped into my subconscious!  I later felt that the fuller breast, which I kept in a much rounder shape, even when building up the flatter one, felt more like an engorged breast, full of milk.  I am currently evening them out a bit, but the sculpture did have a maternal phase for sure:

thelma mesh mother version jenny meehan

thelma mesh mother version jenny meehan

There are other version images, but I will share another time.  I did work quite intensively on this, so far for about seven days.  And now the plaster will no doubt open up many more days!  I now have a long stint of research ahead of me.

Torso in Metal from The Rock Drill Bronze sculpture by Jacob Epstein, 1913-14

Rock Drill or rather “Torso in Metal from ‘The Rock Drill’”  is also at the Tate:

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/epstein-torso-in-metal-from-the-rock-drill-t00340/text-catalogue-entry

Sir Jacob Epstein ‘Torso in Metal from ‘The Rock Drill’’, 1913–4<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
© The estate of Sir Jacob Epstein

The image above is copyright the estate of Sir Jacob Epstein.  Bronze sculpture by Jacob Epstein, 1913-14, Tate Britain.  Included for non-commercial purpose of commentary only.   

Outline of my “Fair Use”  rationale, which is applicable to all images from other sources which I include on this blog:
There is no alternative, public domain or free-copyrighted replacement image available to my knowledge.
Its inclusion in my blog adds significantly to my narrative  because it shows the subject which I want to refer to and relate to my own artistic practice and is necessary in order for me to communicate accurately my observations/critical appraisal/appreciation/educate my readers, in understanding my perspectives on art and life.  Inclusion is for information, education and analysis only. The text discussing the significance of the included  art work is enhanced by inclusion of the image. The image is a low resolution copy of the original work of such low quality that it will not affect potential sales of the art work.

This may have possibly influenced “Der Trommler”  by  Michael Sandle, I wonder?  Well, I know not, but it certainly makes me feel better about my peculiar sculpture, and the rather alien appearance it has!   That beak like head…In fact, any strange head, is particularly disturbing somehow, and Thelma’s head is something I will be changing quite a bit, though the central line does strike a note of determination, without being the visor-like shield which both the Epstein “Rock Drill” and the Sandle “Der Trommler”   have.   So it may be alien, but it is not as menacing.    Both the Epstein and Sandle also have ribs showing, while with Thelma I felt drawn to the womb/belly area, and in doing so communicate more of a sense of being filled, rather than drained of life/nourishment.

The “Rock Drill” was originally in plaster, and part of a much bigger work which included a rock drill.  There was a reproduction of this made.  When his friend died in the trenches,  the work assumed a painful significance for Epstein, who then separated the head and torso from the rock drill, cast it in bronze, and showed it as an independent sculpture.  See this link:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/art-reviews/6439774/Wild-Things-at-the-Royal-Academy-review.html

The soft part in the middle of Torso in Metal from The Rock Drill interests me…Is this unnervingly the embryo of another to come?  Even the soft part has some sinister possibility?

Jonathon Jones wrote ” “Robbed of its legs and towering tripod-drill, with damaged bronze limbs, The Rock Drill becomes a nightmare image of the future as remorseless, unending war. It is more moving than the original, because it is a wounded machine, a human machine.”

So maybe, that soft part,  seen in the torso, could be some soft humanity, some wound, internal? In the torso, the active arm is cut right back…This is the one which included the clenched fist, grasping the top of the drill. Now disabled, it is indeed easier to see the soft form as some vulnerable part, which it is pretty impossible to do when the whole reconstructed “Rock Drill” Sculpture looms before one, I should imagine.  In my own body, the area between my rib cage there is the place I feel most strongly.  It’s a central, primal, emotion area…anger and fear…both, seem to come from there. Well, all emotions seem to be felt there.

 “Epstein in his Rock Drill sees furthest of them (vorticists) all into a cold technological future, dreams most openly of metallic power – and then sees the agony of such a new world in his second version of his great sculpture.”   Jonathon Jones  (The Guardian Tuesday 14 June 2011)

 http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2011/jun/14/vorticists-epstein-rock-drill

“…unless the events of a life are translated into
significant meanings, then life holds no more revelation than death, and possibly even less”
(Where I Live 142). TENNESSEE WILLIAMS

 

Contemporary Christian Art

Found this…Will be useful to me:

http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/contemporary-christian-art

As I start to think about bringing images and symbols into my painting again, I am taking a process of researching others work/thinking and also reviewing my own.  I have found my interest in Ignation Spirituality very useful indeed both personally, in the form of a regular practice of the Examen, and also in relation to a change of heart in terms of my willingness to use biblical narrative in my visual art.  Attending an Ignation Retreat Day at the Mount Street Jesuit Centre in London brought a renewed willingness to bring my imagination and creativity to play more intimately with my own spiritual understandings and experiences.   So I have a sense in which, after much tension between two pulls…One being the search for a subject matter which I could focus on in a conscious way for an extended period of time and the other being the desire NOT to pin myself down to any particular subject matter in a conscious way…Yeah,  I have a sense that things might just be coming together anyway.

It interestingly doesn’t feel like a change of direction…  It is more a sense of revelation.  Certain things, ie water, brokenness and fragmentation,  rocks, emotional blockages, stasis and fluidity,  the human figure,  birth and death (so fundamental!) and disintergration/devastation in relation to wholeness/transformation… Well, they have always been there.  It’s as if I can just recognise them more clearly as, rather than being piecemeal, and under the surface, they now announce themselves with a louder unity.  I dislike even using words to pin these things down…immediately, I feel “Oh, yeah, “life”  “death”…yeah, well that pretty much covers everything, doesn’t it.  However,  the general expressed in the specific, is maybe something else in it’s generation.  So I shouldn”t worry about repetition.  Searching for some novel new idea or concept may be a thankless quest, maybe even hopeless. Probably.  The ground is rich by virtue of years and years of accumulated matter.  It’s lived and died, and brings life and death again.

Spiritual Mentoring

I  continue my strand on the way that “Spiritual Direction” has been described:

“Spiritual direction can mean different things to different people. Some people understand it to be the art of listening carried out in the context of a trusting relationship. It is when one person is trained to be a competent guide who then “companions” another person, listening to that person’s life story with an ear for the movement of the Holy, of the Divine.”

Rev. Jeffrey S. Gaines, Presbyterian, USA

Quite like that one…the listening part, in particular, is a real skill.  I am rather in awe of the listening skills of my own spiritual mentor and of my therapist!  (I prefer to use “mentor” rather than guide, as I see the guiding/direction part of the interaction as something which comes from within the person, rather than something I do…It is more a matter, to my mind, of encouraging the person to keep by the/and realise, the well which brings most life to them in terms of their spiritual life).  

I am a real newbie in my thinking about spiritual direction, but am enjoying thinking about it, none the less!  I am interested in the way that my own spirituality and creativity interact, and how stepping out  creatively can have such a positive influence on a  sense of significance, meaning and purpose in life.  I have recently been accepted onto the SPIDIR training, which is one day a month training for two years.  I am delighted about this.  SPIDIR is an informal ecumenical Christian network promoting spiritual direction.

 

 

santissima trinita 1927 winifred knights female british painter

santissima trinita 1927 winifred knights female british painter

With thanks to Sacha Llewellyn for allowing me to include this image and its accompanying text. Readers may wish to consult the website http://www.winifredknights.com/

‘Tomorrow morning I am going right up into the mountains with a mule and a very beautiful cover & some Anticoli peasants to see a miracle which happens every year, at Valle Pietra, in the Abruzzi’. (Letter from Knights to her Aunt, 1923).

While I have not gone on a pilgrimage, I use walking in my own contemplative practice almost every day.  Since walking the Labyrinth at St John’s Waterloo, I realised that walking, like swimming, is a great way to get my mind into a gear which enables me to think more clearly about things.  It is rather like painting, but with no specific object in mind.  Maybe a painting is like a pilgrimage, in the sense that there is an object at the end of it?  Hopefully, a miracle of some kind!

This lovely painting, shown above,  by Winifred Knights has a lovely “other worldliness” about it, but expressed in the natural landscape.. I do like that combination!

The painting below is mine… Water and flowers tend to go well together, as flowers wilt without water!

 

 

 

Falling Flowers - Jenny Meehan

Falling Flowers – Jenny Meehan

Water Flow and Flowers… Falling Flowers.   That kind of thing.

Art and Culture – The role they play in society interesting article in The Observer by Peter Bazalgette

Peter Bazalgette,  (the Arts Council Chairman), has published an article in The Observer highlighting the role the arts play in society and focusing on the health, wellbeing and educational benefits of culture.  He notes: “Although the arts do not pretend to be a front line health service, we’re coming to understand how they can function very effectively in a complementary role.”

As an artist who sometimes (thankfully not too much!) comes across people who ask me “What’s the point?” of what I focus my time on, or who have simply not spent any time thinking about the value of the arts in society, it is always interesting to find a read like this!

Read the article by Peter Bazalgette in the Observer here:

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2014/apr/27/value-of-arts-and-culture-to-society-peter-bazalgette

On the subject of health and well being, one of the paintings that has given to me very much in terms of positive mental massaging is this painting by John Martin which can be found at Tate Britian.  I have gazed at this painting on many occasions:

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/martin-the-plains-of-heaven-t01928

The romantic in me, enlightened once again!

This is an excellent essay.

http://paintingperceptions.com/art-politics/how-painting-can-help-save-the-world-actually

Apologies, reader, I am using my Journal as a note taking device… I do this, but it doesn’t make for good reading in itself.  It’s very handy for when I am out and and about, and I want to look back on something I have found and referenced.  Quick, easy, and all held within the long and rambling strand on a single blog!

I am always  keen to make my Jenny Meehan Artist’s Journal blog more concise and not such a large accumulation of pretty much everything I spend time mulling over. (However, I am, of course, unsuccessful in this respect!)  I am a little bit conscious that it might be read (with being on the internet!)…Though please just skim, skim, skim... that is the wonder of reading things on the internet, and the wonder of scrolling down your phone at high speed.  Things have changed.  I don’t really need to worry about oppressing you with detail or not ordering things enough, you can do it so easily yourself!

So, skim over the surface, as you will, dipping in here and there only when caught with particular interest!

Everything nowadays requires a great deal of filtration…because there is so much, too much, to choose from.  This brings a complexity into life which can make it harder to define one’s own path. My journal  helps me narrow down all I come across, at least a little bit.   If you read it, and it serves in some way to provide some interesting routes for your own thinking, then I am well pleased.  If it dissolves into endless ramble, which I know it does from time to time, this is part of the intention.  I am not seeking to craft a resolved structure in my writing, but chase, my endlessly meandering mind, a little bit here and there, attempting to find some kind of light in the never ending darkness!   The question “Where am I going?” is always going to be a bit of a mystery!

Painting…

Well, it is happening, in it’s normal piecemeal fashion.  I am constantly working on one thing or another… Be it constructing frames for paintings (this is both cheaper than buying frames, and far more satisfying!) or just experimenting with materials.  I’ve found myself in the depths of abstraction once more…  working in that drawing from the subconscious way again, with no pre determined plan at the outset.  I like the surprise of seeing what evolves.  I like not knowing what will be.  I like to meander my way through the painting process and just respond as it happens, sometimes changing my mind.  It’s a great big risk and I love it.   It stretches my out of my comfort zone, which seems to be my main enjoyment.

Buried Mother Oil Painting - Jenny Meehan

Buried Mother Oil Painting – Jenny Meehan

This painting “Buried Mother” ((oil on canvas) started out as a mother and child (flip over to the left in your mind) but became “Buried Mother”.   I’ve just made a frame for it, but haven’t decided quite which colour to paint the frame as yet.  Gosh, I love oil paint.  So forgiving.  It’s quite interesting starting one painting, reacting badly to it, and covering it over!  (always a risk when painting a mother and child for me! ) Maybe it is  cathartic, in some sense, to realise that some image, from memory, might be, quite literally, re-covered!

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Well, that’s it for this year, Have a Great Christmas!

 

Jenny Meehan is a painter and designer based in East Surrey/South West London.
Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details.   

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.   

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom.   To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s  bi-annual  mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date.

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

I would be very pleased if you would  choose to “follow” the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed of what I am up to this way.   Just press  the “follow” button and pop in your email address.  You determine how often you get updates and you don’t need a WordPress account to follow Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.  

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting

by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

Notice regarding my use of images on my Jenny Meehan Artist’s Journal blog:   I always try and contact the relevant artist if I include images of their work on my blog and make clear the source.  Where images are taken from other websites, I make it my practice to  cite the source and normally include a link to the place where the image was found.  When I include images I do so in the belief that this will not cause commercial harm to the copyright holder. I  believe that this is fair use  and does not infringe copyright.  Images are used in order for me to comment and reference them in relation to my own creative and artistic practice.  When I include extracts of text, I also do so with the understanding that again, this is permissible under the widely accepted fair usage terms with respect to copyright.

Outline of my “Fair Use”  rationale, which is applicable to all images from other sources which I include on this blog:
There is no alternative, public domain or free-copyrighted replacement image available to my knowledge.
Its inclusion in my blog adds significantly to my narrative  because it shows the subject which I want to refer to and relate to my own artistic practice and is necessary in order for me to communicate accurately my observations/critical appraisal/appreciation/educate my readers, in understanding my perspectives on art and life.  Inclusion is for information, education and analysis only. The text discussing the significance of the included  art work is enhanced by inclusion of the image. The image is a low resolution copy of the original work of such low quality that it will not affect potential sales of the art work.

Ben  Nicholson – Winifred Nicholson – Christopher Wood – Alfred Wallis – William Staite Murray – “Art and Life 1920 – 1931 – 4th June – 21st September

As I have recently joined as a friend of Dulwich Picture Gallery I duly received my invitation to the Private View of “Art and Life 1920 – 1931” and made my  first trip to Dulwich Picture Gallery on the 9th June.  It was a very nice visit, but as I don’t drink alcohol, I was disappointed with the soft drinks option being water, and that was that.  Need to email them and request Teetotallers are better catered for I think.  It was a day of sun, and green.

You were not allowed to take photographs of the paintings.  Oh, so sad.  No sense.  It would have been handy for reference.  But I will remember the colour, and the poetry, particularly of Winifred Nicholson’s paintings, which I liked the most.

I have long admired the paintings of both Ben and Winifred Nicholson, but also very much loved the paintings of William Nicholson… but his were not to be seen… I am certain they must have had an effect on Winifred, in particular.   I spent some time when at West Dean a few years ago enjoying “The Art of William Nicholson: British Painter and Printmaker – by Colin Campbell, Merlin James” which was published in 2004 by the Royal Academy of Arts.  I would buy this book but unfortunately it is rather costly at £85!

Info on William Nicholson below, taken from the above website. He was born 1872 and died 1949.    Text credit included below.

  • British painter, printmaker, and designer. He briefly attended Herkomer’s school in Bushey, then studied at the Académie Julian, Paris. Early in his career he worked mainly as a printmaker and designer, notably on some brilliant poster designs in the 1890s, done in collaboration with his brother-in-law James Pryde under the name ‘J. & W. Beggarstaff’.

Text Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists (Oxford University Press)

“Nicholson, Sir William” The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists. Ed Ian Chilvers. Oxford University Press 2009 Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press.

I’ve just been looking at an image of this painting, and it has left me quite speechless… It is the emotional dimension and poetry of the painting which I love…each mark is tender and full of freshness and life.  There is no need for moving images with paintings like this to see.  The movement happens internally, and the spirit stirs at the sight, not of the illusion, for the picture is simply a vehicle, but because of the expression, which not only depicts an external scene, but traces the heart movements of the painter at the same time.

 

paintings influencing jenny meehan, A Glade Near Midhurst by William Nicholson(c) Elizabeth Banks; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

A Glade Near Midhurst by William Nicholson(c) Elizabeth Banks; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

I include this image with credit to The Public Catalogue Foundation.  A Glade Near Midhurst by William Nicholson is copyright Elizabeth Banks.

See my text on my usage of this image*

I just love it.  It makes me want to paint immediately!   I feel a bit lost right now with respect to my painting, but mostly because all the domestic things which need doing are running off with my time in their hands.  Once I am doing it, all will be well.  Painting doesn’t seem like a problem when I am doing it, only when I am not!  Maybe the best problem to have then, better than the other way around.

In the Dulwich Picture Gallery it was Winifred Nicholson’s paintings which caught my interest and provided the most enjoyment.

Winifred Nicholson, Summer1928. copyright The Trustees of Winifred Nicholson

Winifred Nicholson, Summer1928.
copyright The Trustees of Winifred Nicholson

Winifred Nicholson, Summer1928.
copyright The Trustees of Winifred Nicholson. See my copyright note*(tried to email, no success)

Winifred Nicholson  “Summer1928”  was just one of many examples with the surface of the canvas utilised in that wonderful way which brings a softness to the brightest colours.   It is the feeling, so direct, so personal, that comes across.  This is not painting for anyone else but herself.  This is the best way.

“Nicholson particularly enjoyed painting flowers and said: ‘I have tried to paint many things in many different ways, but my paintbrush always gives a tremor of pleasure when I let it paint a flower’.

However, Nicholson was not concerned with botanical accuracy, but rather wanted the plants and flowers to signify the time and place in which they were painted. This painting with its gestural and loose brush strokes illustrates her ability to communicate mood and atmosphere using few brush marks.

Nicholson believed that colour was the most important element of painting and in 1944 published the article, The Liberation of Colour, under the name Winifred Dacre.”

Text taken from http://www.gac.culture.gov.uk/nicholson.html

 

Gary Wragg Interview on Abstract Critical

Smashing Interview at Abstract Critical on Gary Wragg:

Gary Wragg talks to Matthew Collings… Very worth while combination!

http://abstractcritical.com/note/matthew-collings-talks-to-gary-wragg/#comment-499265

Abstract Critical has some very interesting articles in it.  I shimmy along for a read from time to time.  Keeps the brain matter challenged.  I am not an academic by nature, but I have always enjoyed critical analysis.   Come to think of it, it was one of my strong subjects when studying Literature at Kingston University.

 

Poetry and Painting Relationship

http://poetrychina.net/wp/calligraphy-painting/poetry_painting/2

 

Mmm…

 

 

Signs of the Times”  Prints to Buy over the Internet

I now have available selected prints from the “Signs of the Times” series on my Photobox Gallery.  The Photobox Gallery is a handy facility for enabling people to buy my prints in a quick, easy and affordable way.  The prints I describe as “Poster Prints” because they are not signed and checked by me, but I am very confident about the quality.  They are in fact  A2 and A3 sized laser prints printed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.  Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

http://www.photoboxgallery.com/19507 

There are other options for different types of prints on the Photobox Gallery, but at the present time I am restricting the distribution of my work over the Photobox Gallery to just A2 and A2 laser prints.   However, if you do want something specific, just contact me with your requirements and I am completely free, (thanks to not limiting these images to “limited edition”) to arrange to have prints made to varying specifications and to be signed and numbered.

Some of the “Signs of the Times” are at Baker Tilly in Guildford at the moment.  That was a useful body of work for me…Going all geometric like that!  And advertising annoys me terribly.  How much better to have signage which simply says what it is… and doesn’t impose some sense of what you might be lacking, or creating some need or desire that you don’t feel yourself.  Advertising creates a market for what someone wants to sell even when the market doesn’t exist….I do wonder about this.  This strategy to make us buy.  This way of selling.  We are surrounded by it to such an extent that the confusion it causes can become difficult to discern.  But my signs are my times.  Simple.  Straightforward.  As they are.  We can be as we are.

Quick Dip print by Jenny Meehan

Quick Dip print by Jenny Meehan. One of the Signs of the Times series

 

 

Lead, kindly Light, amid th’encircling gloom

I also include in this month’s Journal entry this hymn, which I discovered when doing the Labyrinth walk at St John’s Church, Waterloo, at the beginning of the year:

  1. 1. Lead, kindly Light, amid th’encircling gloom;
    Lead thou me on!
    The night is dark, and I am far from home;
    Lead thou me on!
    Keep thou my feet; I do not ask to see
    The distant scene–one step enough for me.
  2. 2. I was not ever thus, nor pray’d that thou
    Shouldst lead me on.
    I loved to choose and see my path; but now,
    Lead thou me on!
    I loved the garish day, and, spite of fears,
    Pride ruled my will. Remember not past years.
  3. 3. So long thy pow’r hath blest me, sure it still
    Will lead me on
    O’er moor and fen, o’er crag and torrent, till
    The night is gone.
    And with the morn those angel faces smile,
    Which I have loved long since, and lost awhile!
  4. Text: John Henry Newman, 1801-1890
    Music: John B. Dykes, 1823-1876

There is a huge conflict between knowing and unknowing.   I feel it a lot with my work especially, just wanting to know what is happening.  In reality, I haven’t a clue, though I speculate, right, think, and suggest.  This Journal is as stumbling as it will always be.  But I like writing.  It is some kind of reflection, at least.

I am trying to keep my Jenny Meehan WordPress Journal a little more brief than in the past, so that is it for now!

 

Jenny Meehan is a painter and designer based in East Surrey/South West London.
Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details.   Commissions for paintings are also undertaken at affordable prices.

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings and other artwork forms (prices ranging from between £60 and £700) and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.

Enquiries welcome.  I have more artwork than I can display on the internet, so let me know if you are looking for something specific in terms of style, function, or subject matter. 

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom and holds regular Open Studio/Studio Sale events.  To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s bi-annual  mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date.

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

I would be very pleased if you would  choose to “follow” the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed of what I am up to this way.   Just press  the “follow” button and pop in your email address.  You determine how often you get updates and you don’t need a WordPress account to follow Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.  I don’t have a Facebook page as yet, and won’t be on Twitter.  So this is the best way to follow my art practice.  Though I ramble on, I try to organise things for easy skimming, so you can pick and choose according to your own interests quite easily!    

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting

by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

*Notice regarding my use of images on my Jenny Meehan Artist’s Journal blog:   I always try and contact the relevant artist if I include images of their work on my blog and make clear the source.  Where images are taken from other websites, I make it my practice to  cite the source and often include a link to the place where the image was found. If this is not possible I will include a fair use rationale.   When I include images I do so in the belief that this will not cause commercial harm to the copyright holder. I  believe that this is fair use  and does not infringe copyright.  Images are used in order for me to comment and reference them in relation to my own creative and artistic practice.  When I include extracts of text, I also do so with the understanding that again, this is permissible under the widely accepted fair usage terms with respect to copyright.

From time to time, I wish I was a painter in America, as I think that abstraction is more quickly understood and more easily embraced there.   But I like it here in the UK!  It’s just a whim!

” It is actually impossible to argue with someone who refuses to experience the power of abstract art, because to feel it you have to let yourself go a bit. Perhaps the problem is one of trust. British sceptics cannot bring themselves to trust the mystery of aesthetic experience.”  A quote from  Jonathon Jones

For the whole article, see:  http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2011/jul/07/abstract-art-snobs-puritan

Mmmm.  I like reading things like this.  It helps! It helps with facing the look of confusion and disdain which sometimes (not always!) comes when someone is faced with a mass of colour, layers and light bouncing around, and looks for the sign post of the familiar, which cannot be found.  It is an understandable difficulty, because it does take a certain leap, a leaving behind of the world as we know it.  But it’s not really very far from us… our imaginations need to work internally and externally, and a painting may bring a beautiful arena for fun, fun, fun!   I guess a figure here and there might be helpful sometimes?… Suggesting that personal “way in”.. a kind of door.  A kind of, ” Look, stand, wait… You might be able to locate yourself in here somewhere!” I often think of painting more representationally…But when I look outside and see the extent of the creative achievements of our Creator… it seems wrong to present a shabby replica.  Light is light.  It won’t bounce off even the most radiant impressionist type painting in the same way it does in daily life.  It seems like a good challenge to show light in a painting in that way, but it is not the challenge that I want to rise to.  (Though I admire the work of all artists, whatever their interest).  If I want to capture light, then I use a camera.  Limited use for colour, but good for black and white and light!

Life drawing, however is a different matter.  I am keeping my eyes nice and sharp with regular life drawing… And the human figure is the centre of things, the easily identifiable seat of emotions..The reminder of our common humanity.  Below is a past study.  Not a finished art work, but an exercise, and still very abstracted!

Barry by Jenny Meehan, male figure life drawing charcoal, figuration drawing,representational drawing,semi abstract representational figure life drawing nude, jenny meehan jamartlondon.com

Barry by Jenny Meehan

 

Barry by Jenny Meehan, male figure life drawing charcoal, figuration drawing,representational drawing,semi abstract representational figure life drawing nude, jenny meehan jamartlondon.com

Figure on a Sheet – Jenny Meehan

These two above were done a while ago.  I have found a nice life drawing group in Dulwich, and plan to participate in that as much as possible.  I particularly want to get into painting the human figure, as observed directly from life.  I think this might be good.

Female Painters I like… I am tired of the way that female painters are not represented very well at all in the canon of art history, how it stands.  Yes, it has become much more of the “in thing” to dig up a woman here and there in galleries, but I feel sad when I think about all those wonderful painters and paintings that have been left to float away comparatively unnoticed, because they were not thought so important.  I expect there are many reasons for this, and I haven’t studied the matter in any depth at all.  So I may make a point of searching for paintings from women painters to look at on my blog.     Take heart from your sisters in the art… A female painter I did stumble across at Tate Britain recently was Winifred Knights, and what a joy that was.

“The Deluge”, which is found at Tate Britain.  The Deluge 1920 by Winifred Knights 1899-1947

The Deluge 1920 by Winifred Knights 1899-1947

The image is copyright to the Estate of Winifred Knights. (see link below) I will include several images of paintings by Winifred Knights over the course of this journal for a while, as I like to mull over painters I like, and having the images in my journal makes it easy for me to do so on my phone while I am on the go. For all the Winifred Knights images you see, the following applies:

Winifred Knights: with thanks to Sacha Llewellyn for allowing me to include this image and its accompanying text.  Readers may wish to consult the website http://www.winifredknights.com/

Winifred Knights “The Deluge” is not as fluid and lyrical as I like my own painting, but how marvellously constructed,  and it’s very emotive.  It’s a lesson in greys too!  I find this type of figurative modernism highly attractive, and the way it is rooted in the Italian traditon (specifically Trecento and Quattrocento) is clever and effective.

Another view and some text here, at Tate Britain: http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/knights-the-deluge-t05532 Winifred Knights “The Deluge”

 

 

Deluge by Jenny Meehan. abstract painting process led

Deluge by Jenny Meehan

Well, as you know, my own painting painted a while back, I also called “Deluge” and though I was not thinking of the Biblical narrative in particular, certainly a large amount of overcoming water was the main thrust in my painting. There is a little bit of a house (or maybe ark!) type form, which I did develop with a sense of there being a secure, but also, vulnerable place.  (bottom centre)   Water is regularly occurring in a large number of my paintings.. it must be the psychotherapy or something!  A result of all this deep level thinking!  The feeling, the feeling of being overcome and  overwhelmed  is a common one.  Even more so, with the pace of life, as it is set in our culture right now.

Reflecting on the flood story in the Old Testament,  I have sometimes  told my children that the flood was possibly caused by the Creator’s tears… so overwhelmed by sorrow, that it was uncontrollable and the Creator could not hold the grief in any longer.  I like this imaginative and creative  way of  reading and understanding it, and have made it clear of the creative nature of my interpretation, of course!  I do believe the flood was a real historical and geographically rooted event, (though its exact extent I guess we will never know.  Seems sensible that it was partial). As a metaphor, it is very rich and significant.   For me, it is pointing to a compassionate and emotionally rich Creator.   One who understands, hates destruction,  and has a plan for salvation.  This, which I have taken from the BioLogos Foundation is a very helpful take:

“Lessons of the Flood

Regardless of the details surrounding the event, there are significant theological lessons to be learned from the Flood narrative.28 In the early church, Tertullian, Jerome, Ambrose, Cyril of Jerusalem, and Augustine understood the story of the flood to encourage moral conduct.29 For example, Noah can also be used as an example of Christian perseverance, since he had great faith to build the Ark that God commanded (see James 5:11).  Origen, Jerome, Augustine and others also employed other allegorical methods to illustrate Christian principles. 30  Being conversant with other flood stories from ancient Mesopotamia as well as the general theology of Genesis will also help us understand the point of this story.  The biblical flood is a response by God to the corruption of humanity, save Noah.  The flood waters are not a random punishment, however, but an undoing of creation –– a return to the state of chaos that existed before God gave order (this is described in Genesis 1).  The waters of chaos had been kept at bay by the firmament, the raqia, which is a solid dome above, and by the earth below.  That is how Earth became habitable.  When we read in Genesis 7:11 that the “fountains of the great deep burst open, and the floodgates of the sky were opened”, it means that God is letting the barriers give way so that the waters of chaos can crash back down upon the Earth, thus making it uninhabitable again.  In other words, God’s intention in this story is to bring Earth back to its state of chaos and start over again, with a new “Adam” (Noah).  We will read throughout scripture that God’s plan of “starting over” will culminate in Jesus, the “last Adam” (1 Corinthians 15:45).”

The above text has been taken from http://biologos.org/   It is  reprinted with permission of The BioLogos Foundation. All rights reserved.

The link to the section of the biologos website is under the “Common Questions” section, as follows:  http://biologos.org/questions/genesis-flood

The biologos.org website is worth taking a good look at.  I have found it very useful in my own thinking.

Art within the psychiatric healthcare setting 

http://www.wellcomecollection.org/explore/mind–body/topics/the-adamson-collection/beyond-art-therapy.aspx

This is a very interesting find on the internet regarding The Adamson Collection.  I have been researching recently about art making within psychiatric hospital/rehabilitation settings.  This research has ranged from Narrative Therapy, which looks also very interesting, to practical considerations regarding techniques and materials within a psychiatric hospital.    One of the things which strikes me in reading the article from the wellcomecollection.org website is the mention of ACTION.  What strikes me most from my own visit a while back to an art room in a psychiatric rehabilitation setting (part of a process of applying for a post as an Art Teacher) is that SPACE is paramount.  I was disappointed not to get the position, but on reflection, the space was very, very, small and questions would have needed to have been asked about the possibility of using additional areas in the hospital to do the art working in, which may or may not have been possible.    Bearing in mind the very physical nature of art making… and in this, I do not have in mind people sitting at little tables with their noses pressed against the paper, but rather, a person standing in front of an easel, pacing this way and that, standing back, walking away, and utilizing the physical space around them, in order to see properly, think clearly, and engage fully with their own art working,  it may be that in the designing of art rooms and art working areas in psychiatric hospitals not enough consideration is given to the necessity for ample space.   I have seem many times, in adult education settings which have nothing to do with mental health service users specific needs, many a person grow extremely irritated and agitated due to a lack of physical space, or their personal creative “area”  (something which seems to grow around a person when involved in anything creative, I find!) being impinged upon, or disrespected unwittingly by someone else.  In a psychiatric hospital or rehabilitation centre I would have thought lack of space could have potentially negative consequences in terms of aggressive behaviours.   If it does for people in a comparatively well state of mind and thinking,  it certainly must be when people are more vulnerable or have less behaviour regulating powers in their possession.

There is also the matter of the need for space to see properly if drawing from observation:  The need for ample distance and stepping back from one’s drawing.  With abstraction too,  it is needful to have a lot of room to stand back.  Part of the pleasure and therapeutic value of working physically with materials is that it is indeed and ACTION and PHYSICAL engagement with materials.  Perceptions of art working seem to be afflicted with an image of it being a sedentary and passive process which necessitates someone sitting down at a table.  I do not blame anyone for this, for there is no one to blame.  It is just another example of lack of depth in planning spaces for specific uses I should think.  But it did strike me, and has been an education in itself, for I had not thought about the matter before.  And, I am most aware, that I see things through my eyes as a professional artist as well as a teacher.  There are no doubt many situations where the objectives of art within a psychiatric setting are not that the service users have ample opportunity to actually learn and develop the skills and techniques used by artists on a regular basis, but maybe just an opportunity to explore some narrative through imagery, or art therapy in a mostly psychological understanding of the term, rather than the actual physical and material  practices in the wider sense.   I come with my own background and experiences, and my own assumptions of what an art therapy opportunity should ideally offer someone.  There are many different approaches!  I am not trained in art therapy, but in art and literature. I am most grateful for the experience of exploring the opportunity for working with art within a psychiatric setting.  There are many potentially exciting and positive possibilities I am sure, though I will have to put my vision for that aside for the time being it seems!  And the limited space was a very significant problem.  If successful, I am sure I would have found some creative solutions to it but  I feel that many positive outcomes and explorations would have been adversely affected by the small size of the art room.  It was little room at all.  Two people maximum, ideally.

If I had more time I would do some research into the matter, but will of course leave for now, as I have more pressing matters to attend to!!  The main thing for me, is that the whole experience was a very positive one, and I know will prove useful in some way.  I have thought through even further many interests and defined further what matters to me in life.  This is a great blessing. Another inspiring find from the Depression Alliance: http://www.depressionalliance.org/PDF/creativity-and-mental-health.pdf

“Sacred Spaces”  Art Exhibition at  Leatherhead Theatre during May 2014

The lighting had not been adjusted for the exhibition when these images of “Sacred Spaces” at Leatherhead Theatre were taken, but it gives you an idea of the exhibition.  I am most grateful to The Leatherhead Theatre for hosting this exhibition, which all the participating artists hope will bring a lot of interest and pleasure to all those who view it.  Take some time out and come and make a  visit..

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey,art spirituality creativity faith contemplation, jenny meehan KAOS kingston artists open studios surrey,sacred art zone creative, jamartlondon.com jenny meehan curator,

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey,art spirituality creativity faith contemplation, jenny meehan KAOS kingston artists open studios surrey,sacred art zone creative, jamartlondon.com jenny meehan curator,

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey,art spirituality creativity faith contemplation, jenny meehan KAOS kingston artists open studios surrey,sacred art zone creative, jamartlondon.com jenny meehan curator,

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey,art spirituality creativity faith contemplation, jenny meehan KAOS kingston artists open studios surrey,sacred art zone creative, jamartlondon.com jenny meehan curator,

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey,art spirituality creativity faith contemplation, jenny meehan KAOS kingston artists open studios surrey,sacred art zone creative, jamartlondon.com jenny meehan curator,

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey,art spirituality creativity faith contemplation, jenny meehan KAOS kingston artists open studios surrey,sacred art zone creative, jamartlondon.com jenny meehan curator,

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey,art spirituality creativity faith contemplation, jenny meehan KAOS kingston artists open studios surrey,sacred art zone creative, jamartlondon.com jenny meehan curator,

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey,art spirituality creativity faith contemplation, jenny meehan KAOS kingston artists open studios surrey,sacred art zone creative, jamartlondon.com jenny meehan curator,

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey,art spirituality creativity faith contemplation, jenny meehan KAOS kingston artists open studios surrey,sacred art zone creative, jamartlondon.com jenny meehan curator,

Sacred Spaces Art Exhibition Surrey

 

Leatherhead Theatre – “Sacred Spaces” Exhibition – More Information on the Artists Taking Part

Chris Birch    Christian’s innovative mixed media work combines illustration with original photography and merges together images and textures by using digital technology with traditional drawing and painting techniques. With layered, blended, manipulated, scanned and re-scanned images, today’s technology provides a much more immediate and direct contact between the medium of photography and digital illustration, allowing for a more sensitive, imaginative and contemplative approach to the work. The images retain the crispness you would expect in quality photography, but the mixing of processes produces more than enhanced photographs. This fusion of traditional and digital skills creates captivating images that have a fresh life of their own. Chris Birch graduated in Three Dimensional Design from Kingston Faculty of Art and Design in the late 1970’s, winning a commendation for his work on tactile mapping for the blind.  Influenced by Caravaggio, Fuselli, Bernini, Canova and Cunningham, since moving to Fusion Arts Studios in 2006, his work, which is often based on gothic nightmares, intrigue and dark dreams, has involved mixing photography, illustration, and traditional techniques to produce visually inspiring prints and mixed media originals.

Pick Pocket  Chris Birch

Pick Pocket Chris Birch

Derek Turner “Approaching Stromboli on an Ultramarine Sea” depicts a remembered experience of visiting the island of Stromboli. As you approach the island the sea is ultramarine blue, due to the black volcanic ash on the seabed. Billowing plumes of smoke which have come from the volcano itself hang above the island. The majority of the houses were boarded up as many inhabitants had left to live elsewhere. This gave the island a rather surreal atmosphere. There was a restaurant on the beach for visitors to the island to have lunch. I studied graphics at Beckenham School of Art and worked at a number of London advertising agencies, as an Art Director. I also set up my own photographic studio and worked mainly in the advertising and editorial fields before taking up painting full time. I have exhibited extensively in both the UK and abroad since 1994 PUBLIC COLLECTIONS Hounslow and Spelthorne Trust Hillingdon Hospital West Middlesex Hospital PRIZE WINNER Xerox Painting Competition – 1st Prize EWACC – Contemporary Art online – 1st Prize

Derek Turner "Approaching Stromboli on an Ultramarine Sea"

Derek Turner “Approaching Stromboli on an Ultramarine Sea”

 

 

“Sacred Spaces” runs from 2pm on Saturday 3rd May until Friday 30th May  during normal theatre opening hours which are normally 10am – 4pm Tuesday – Saturdays, (sometimes until 10pm but check with theatre first , phone  01372 365141)

“Sacred Spaces”  is located in the ground floor foyer at Leatherhead Theatre 7 Church Street Leatherhead Surrey KT22 8DN.  Disabled access and toilet facilities.  Coffee shop open 10am – 2pm and at other times subject to the performance schedule.

Contact Jenny Meehan at j.meehan@tesco.net for more info! or see  www.jamartlondon.com and

www.kingstonartistsopenstudios.co.uk

Visiting Information:

 

The Leatherhead Theatre
7, Church Street
LEATHERHEAD
Surrey
KT22 8DN

Tel: 01372 365141
Fax:     01372 365195

Accessible location – 5 mins from M25, Junction 9

5 minutes walk from Leatherhead British Rail Station.
Town centre location, close to local shops and restaurants.
Three car parks within a few minutes walk (free after 6pm)
Disabled places right outside the theatre.

Well, it was an eclectic mixture of work with plenty of interesting artist’s to research.  My favourite work was by the London based artist Lesley Hilling.  On her website is a delightful video of her studio, which looks amazing!  For more on Lesley Hilling see   http://www.lesleyhilling.co.uk/information  

The work on show was enchanting to look at, possessing integrity and beauty… quite captivating.

The work on show at “Lines” was Darkwood Days Wood, a mixed media work, with dimensions of 29cm x 28cm x 17cm

The blurb…

“Lesley Hilling is a London based artist who makes sculptural collages from a wide range of recycled materials that take the form of box constructions, walls, towers and spheres. Obsessive joinery is merged with a confusion of disparate elements, structured in a complex but ordered whole. Her work conveys a powerful sense of longing to preserve the fragments of the past, a desire for order, a passionate and mysterious evocation of lost moments.”

But best of all take a look at the image, and if possible, go and see the work “in the flesh”.  There’s a good image of it here:

http://www.advertisingexhibitions.co.uk/artist_lesley_hilling.html

My work “London Downpour” needed to be viewed from a greater distance, however, due to the narrow dimensions of most of the lower part of the gallery, this was not possible.   Because it was an experiment with colour and space, it’s tricky to view from close up.  When I was painting it, well, indeed, when I was painting all of the process-led paintings last year, I found I had to stand at least 6 metres away to work out what was happening with the colour-space relationships.  With little obvious pictorial structure to rely upon, and the structure only establishing itself in a gradual and piecemeal fashion, the distance was vital.  I think it could be viewed in a OK way from about three metres.  However, it must have been quite a challenge to place the works in the Strand Gallery, as there are lots of angles, corners, and different proportions of wall, so I think bearing in mind the constraints an excellent job was done, and the exhibition looked really good.  To hang so much work by very different artists in a pretty restricted space is not something I would want to have to do!  I found hanging the work of three artists along a flat wall at Leatherhead Theatre quite enough to orchestrate.  So my hearty “Congratulations” to the organisers of the show, including of course Jack Smurthwaite who curated the exhibition.

Here’s the image of “London Downpour” in situ.

London Downpour- Jenny Meehan painting abstraction at The Strand Gallery London as part of "Lines" visual art exhibition, jenny meehan jamartlondon london downpour process led painting british contemporary female abstract expressionistic painting, claude venard style work of london southbank tate modern river thames,contemporary emerging artist exhibition london.

London Downpour- Jenny Meehan painting abstraction at The Strand Gallery London as part of “Lines” visual art exhibition. Lyrical and geometric abstraction painting southbank london from the imagination! painted in a process-led, intuitive guided fashion, external impressions from regular trips to London appear to have seeped into my subconscious!

I love meeting people and the Private View was an enjoyable event.  I also love tonic water, and as I don’t drink alcohol, I passed on the gin and drunk only the tonic water, which was very nice and flavoursome indeed!   Wish I had had more.  It was exceptionally HOT in the gallery and refreshment was much needed.  It was interesting having come to the Private View directly from a visit to the National Gallery.  Having bathed myself in some amazing paintings, the creation of which, I realise day by day, my heart finds most interest in, and which hold a most lasting impression, I think to  myself that it is true that any artist should constantly hold themselves against the work which has hung on walls for a long time,  and continue to assess what they do in the light of the past, which, though it might seem  backward to some minds,  actually holds within it’s aged hands, the very keys to the future.  History. Maybe the greatest teacher to any forward thinking person?

I am taking some time right now to review some past drawings which I worked at during a Life Drawing Weekend Short Course at West Dean College, Near Chichester, Sussex.  I am very grateful for all the  training I get from my visits to West Dean and my participation in various short courses at West Dean College now stretches back over a period of nine years…Something I can hardly believe!  Initially working with sculpture (which I still love) I have found in the high standard of tuition and the amazing opportunity to learn from experienced creative practitioners a wonderful solution to the problem of meeting my needs for training.  I am now very much thinking that it is a blessing that I did my degree in Literature and not Fine Art, as I find my interest in words and image complement each other very well indeed.  Due to increased financial constraints (mostly due to rising energy bills and rising costs of pretty much everything!)  I find now I must restrict my training opportunities and I have resigned myself to the understanding that from now on it will be one, very short course, probably about once every two years from now on.   However, I have much material and ideas accumulated, and I will not go short in the sense that my creativity will not suffer because of this.  I also think I have such a strong sense of direction now, that maybe it will be fitting to steam ahead with little input (apart from the regular exposure to all kinds of wonderful artworks which I encounter in my regular trips to London).  I have tried applying for a couple of residencies this year, but nothing came of that, and the work involved in applying is considerable.

So, some lines of another kind, here in some recent life drawing examples.  The length of pose varies from very quick, say, just a few minutes, to the longer pose. Quality is variable, I haven’t posted up here as fine examples, rather reference.  There are some interesting things going on, and it has been good to “retune” my eyes, which have become somewhat lazy through lack of observational study.  I will take some of this work to develop I think.  Some of the drawings have quite a nice feeling to them, and I do like working with charcoal more than pencil I have found.  I am most grateful to Valerie Wiffen for her valuable input, which I will carry with me into further observational drawings in the future.

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

  example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

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