Ah, how I love long never ending titles!  And meandering discourse.

As per usual, skim as fast or slow as you need…I always pack lots of too much of everything in!

 

From: ‘In No Strange Land’ by Francis Thompson

 

O world invisible, we view thee,
O world intangible, we touch thee,
O world unknowable we know thee,
Inapprehensible, we clutch thee.

Does the fish soar to find the ocean,
The eagle plunge to find the air –
That we ask of the stars in motion
If they have rumour of thee there?
From ‘In No Strange Land’ by Francis Thompson

 

Willi Baumeister

What a delightful poem… indeed, “world unknowable”  is so attractive to the painter, particularly one as myself.   I recal “The Unknown in Art” by Willi Baumeister suddenly, though I have not read it yet..not yet.    I have been looking on the net again at the work of Willi Baumeister, who is one of my favourite influences, and was reminded again of his use of sand in painting.  I started using sand a while back, but now use very tiny glass beads as they have little colour and reflect light very consistently.  Recently while painting, I pressed some of the smallest micron beads into the surface of some very full bodied paint and the effect was very pleasing indeed.  I think if I put any kind of varnish on top (I normally put a very thin layer of varnish on my acrylic paintings in order to protect them) the effect will be ruined, but with the thickness of the paint I have pressed the tiny glass pieces into, thankfully there is plenty of grip there, so I should think there will be no need for any further application, certainly on the fixing front, at least.

I always try to try something new when I start a group of paintings.  While I wouldn’t say that I work in a series, at all, the various paintings sessions normally leave their mark in terms of the colour groupings I use, or new experiments tried out.  And I am finding myself rather attracted to working on paintings in pairs…though their relationship won’t stay intimate I don’t think, somehow working on two at a time works well for me, at least in the initial stages.

Back to Willi Baumeister..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willi_Baumeister

And here, some quotation from the wiki information on his work, which is of particular interest to me:

“Baumeister took part in his first exhibition in 1910, showing figurative works inspired by impressionism. His chief interest was even at this time already in cubism and Paul Cézanne, whose work remained important to him throughout his life. These influences of impressionism and cubism that shaped Baumeister’s early paintings played an essential role in his work until the end of the 1920s. On the one hand, his representational painting was increasingly reduced (abstracting and geometric) as it gained form and lost depth. Parallel to the paintings of his friend Oskar Schlemmer, Baumeister’s independent exploration of form and color emerged. Already around 1919, his teacher Adolf Hölzel wrote to him: “Out of all of us, you will be the one who will achieve the most.” Also worth noticing is that the idiosyncratic German path into modernism, expressionism, barely resonates at all in Baumeister’s work, even though he had met, for instance, Franz Marc earlier on, and was certainly acquainted with the works of the Brücke (Bridge) artists and those of the Blaue Reiter (Blue Rider).

After his return from the First World War, Baumeister rigorously developed his work further. Although one still finds figurative elements in his paintings, the forms grew increasingly geometric and took on a dynamic of their own, and Baumeister broke the traditional connection between form and color. Various work groups emerged at this time, including the relief-like wall pictures, and paintings with sports theme (as a symbol for modernity). In his painting, the grappling with shapes and material of the painting as well as the relationship between reality and representation became visible. Parallel to this development, nonrepresentational painting began to gain a foothold in works that centered on geometric shapes and their relationships to one another in the picture (e.g. Planar Relation of 1920). Baumeister’s lively exchange with other German and foreign artists must also be seen as vitally important in the consequent development of his work. Indeed, as it was for many of his fellow artists, posing such questions was part of the agenda of the modern age (for example, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, Wassily Kandinsky, Fernand Léger, Amédée Ozenfant, Le Corbusier, Paul Klee).

Towards the end of the 1920s, the shapes in Baumeister’s pictures grew softer. His paintings moved away from being oriented by the elementary shapes of the circle, triangle, and square towards organic forms. Although this development could also be observed concurrently in the work of other artists of his time, in Baumeister’s case, it was tied to his fascination for the prehistoric and archaic paintings. Baumeister intensely explored artifacts of early paintings and integrated this pictorial experience into his own painting. He identified the symbols, signs, and figures of cave painting as components of a valid archaic pictorial language that he used in his works. These included his increasing number of paintings in “oil on sand on canvas” that, in their materials, also approached the cave painting that Baumeister so admired (beg. ca. 1933). He himself collected examples of prehistoric findings, small sculptures, and tools, and occupied himself with cliff drawings that had been discovered in Rhodesia. This experience was undoubtedly important for Baumeister’s artistic disposition since he, evidently inspired by this rich store of prehistoric works, ultimately used extraordinarily reduced organic shapes for his “ideograms” (beg. ca. 1937). In these works he used a unique world of signs, which he saw as symbols for the laws of nature, their evolution, and human existence.

Baumeister’s artistic development was not interrupted when he lost his professorship at the Städel in Frankfurt in 1933. He continued to paint despite political persecution and economic difficulties. His work and its development are correspondingly diverse, even for the period after 1941, when he was imposed with an exhibition prohibition. While on the one hand his employment at the Dr. Kurt Herberts & Co. varnish factory in Wuppertal to research antique and modern painting techniques protected him politically, it also on the other hand gave him the opportunity to explore the fundamentals of painting, so that he could further his knowledge on the prehistoric cave painting techniques. At the same time, he tuned to Goethe’s theory of plant morphology. Out of this study the “eidos pictures” (eidos: idea) emerged: paintings that, unlike Baumeister’s ideograms, are rich in their variety and coloration. Moreover, the forms are organic, but seem to be less of symbols or signs, than images of simple plantlike and animal life forms. The pictures bear titles such as Rock Garden, Eidos, or Primordial Vegetable.

As an indefatigable researcher and collector, Baumeister also owned examples of African sculpture, in which he, as in the case of the prehistorical artifacts, saw universal images for life, development, and human existence. Correspondingly, their formal language entered Baumeister’s work in the early 1940s—highly abstracted, at first chromatically restrained (African Tale, 1942), and with time, became increasingly colorful and in part very complex in their formal design (Owambo 1944–1948). Both the titles and formal language reveal Baumeister’s preoccupation with other old (Latin American) cultures (Peruvian Wall, 1946, and Aztec Couple, 1948).

Another example of his search for the “foundations of art” is Baumeister’s transposition of the Gilgamesh Epic, one of the oldest surviving literary works. Therefore, Baumeister used his personal pictorial and sign language in his illustration of the narrative (beg. 1943), which resulted in an astonishingly unified cycle, which with his pictorial language came strikingly close to depicting the literary and linguistic effects(impression) of the epic. He also produced illustrations to texts from the Bible—Saul, Esther, Salome—as well as to William Shakespeare’s The Tempest.

In this way, Baumeister single-mindedly and successfully developed a very personal and impressive visual language that was and still is unique in the German art immediately after 1945. The national and international recognition that Willi Baumeister received in the postwar period was correspondingly high. But his artistic development did not stop there. On the one hand, he developed his painting further in a virtuosic manner and, what is more, combined the variety of his formation phases in many other pictures—in part into “overalls structures” that nonetheless still possessed a fundamental that was reminiscent of landscape imageries (Blue Movement, 1950). On the other hand, Baumeister also produced densely packed abstractions that, proceeding from a central form, characterized him as an outstanding “nonrepresentationalist.” These paintings became quite possibly the most famous of his works, and were immediately associated by a broad public with Baumeister (e.g. ARU 2, 1955). Even so, Baumeister did not limit himself to this late “trademark.” Multiform and multicoloured pictures emerged as well in the year of his death.”

quoted from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willi_Baumeister

What a brilliant inspiration Baumeister is… and how grateful I am to both read and see with such ease the paths trodden down so well…!!!  As said, I haven’t yet read his “The Unknown in Art” but it is on my reading list, which, as ever is extremely long!!!!!  I do have some German blood in me…my mother was German-Swiss (Eleanor Rosa Eicher) ( or “Norli Rosa Eicher…informally called!).  My mother’s father is recorded as “unknown” (which is very annoying, as it would be nice to try and trace my ancestory!)  and I have little information available to me now, about him, apart from a photo of her standing at a grave (which I imagine must be her father’s, as she has drew a big question mark on it!!!  I went to Basel as a child, just once, to visit my Granny Josephina Bohlmer (I imagine that my mother’s mother must have remarried and therefore taken the surname Bohlmer??? Or that my mother had taken her Father’s name Eicher, and therefore he was not as unknown as suggested in her marriage documents??? But this is forever going to remain unknown, for me…So more unknown material, also remaining….  (How I just wish I had spoken more to both my parents when they were alive!)  However, I am sure, my parents being who they were, that there would be a lot unsaid that would be unsaid even if I did ask about it!

I have photographs.. including of my great grandmother, who was located in the black forest area of Germany…and that, is pretty much where I need to leave it I think!  To leave it with a felt affinity with several German artists, will probably serve me as well as any other knowledge, and maybe better!  However, worth a mention in reference to my paintings, I see now, is the impression of visiting the Glacier Garden in Lucerne, during that childhood visit to Switzerland (Basel…to see Granny, and to Lucerne, to visit my Uncle Herman, who was a very well renowned chef, and my Auntie, who I think was called Marie:

http://www.gletschergarten.ch/Glacial-potholes.11.0.html?&L=2

Seeing the glacial potholes had a HUGE impression on me… I can remember it so well, and I am quite sure that this experience is seeping into my interests right now with, well, basically rock and water!….  The solid like areas in my paintings, related to my own life/experience, are metaphors for rock and the rest increasingly resonates of water/fluidity of various kinds, emotional as well as physical.

“These impressive potholes were formed at the bottom of the glacier by the sheer force of the water. As is still the case in alpine glaciers today, the melt water initially flowed on the surface of the ice before seeping into the glacier through fissures. At the bottom of the glacier the water was under tremendous pressure. As the flow of water gathered speed, vortices with speeds of up to 200 km/h began to form. Within a few years, potholes had been eroded out of the rock. Most of the erosion was created by sand and gravel that was transported with the cloudy melt-water.”

 

I also remember a very exciting trip up Mount Pilatus,  and a boat ride on the Lake.  It was a completely “out of the world” or the usual world, at least, experience for me, and so I am not surprised that it has such a lasting impression!

 

Afterthoughts…. 

There are plenty of reasons to look back,  and with the wonders of digital image manipulation software, I can play with past paintings in a way that previous generations of artists have not had at their disposal.  While I don’t see my experiments with past paintings combined with digital image manipulation as works in their own right, they are, however valuable “Afterthoughts” and I have taken to calling them that.  For they must have some kind of name, even though they don’t express anything different from the paintings which brought them into being.   To take some sections, to make alterations…Sometimes something new, in it’s own right, does emerge, and it will be named accordingly, because I discovered something within it.   In the end, my main objective is to experiment, and so, this is just another way to do so.   In the process of re-examining the painting, it’s surface, and the colours, I am also currently informing the original paintings which I carry out.  So it is “win win”.

Working on some smaller works… prints… very colourist/expressionist/textural… An interesting development for me…

christian faith painting jenny meehan, abstract expressionist, textural colourful  god  divine religion religious abstract painting,jamartlondon,lyrical abstraction,father son holy spirit,blessing painting,contemplative spirituality,christian mysticism,art to license,book covers christian books,visual art to license,modern contemporary uk british artist,colourist,book cover images,digital images to license;

jenny meehan textural colourful abstract painting afterthoughts into the ocean deep series

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS  To license this  work contact jenny via her website www.jamartlondon.com

Afterthoughts Prints...Into the Ocean Deep Series   textural expressionistic abstract painting print lyrical abstraction Christian spirituality theme of water christian faith painting jenny meehan, abstract expressionist, textural colourful  god  divine religion religious abstract painting,jamartlondon,lyrical abstraction,father son holy spirit,blessing painting,contemplative spirituality,christian mysticism,art to license,book covers christian books,visual art to license,modern contemporary uk british artist,colourist,book cover images,digital images to license;

jenny meehan textural colourful abstract painting afterthoughts

 

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS To license this work contact jenny via her website www.jamartlondon.com

 

Afterthoughts Prints...Into the Ocean Deep Series   textural expressionistic abstract painting print lyrical abstraction Christian spirituality theme of water christian faith painting jenny meehan, abstract expressionist, textural colourful  god  divine religion religious abstract painting,jamartlondon,lyrical abstraction,father son holy spirit,blessing painting,contemplative spirituality,christian mysticism,art to license,book covers christian books,visual art to license,modern contemporary uk british artist,colourist,book cover images,digital images to license; inner life spiritual development,faith focused,subconscious depth,

jenny meehan textural colourful abstract painting afterthoughts

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS To license this work contact jenny via her website www.jamartlondon.com

 

 

Afterthoughts Prints...Into the Ocean Deep Series   textural expressionistic abstract painting print lyrical abstraction Christian spirituality theme of water christian faith painting jenny meehan, abstract expressionist, textural colourful  god  divine religion religious abstract painting,jamartlondon,lyrical abstraction,father son holy spirit,blessing painting,contemplative spirituality,christian mysticism,art to license,book covers christian books,visual art to license,modern contemporary uk british artist,colourist,book cover images,digital images to license; book cover images christian themes

jenny meehan textural colourful abstract painting afterthoughts

 

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS To license this work contact jenny via her website www.jamartlondon.com

Afterthoughts Prints...Into the Ocean Deep Series   textural expressionistic abstract painting print lyrical abstraction Christian spirituality theme of water christian faith painting jenny meehan, abstract expressionist, textural colourful  god  divine religion religious abstract painting,jamartlondon,lyrical abstraction,father son holy spirit,blessing painting,contemplative spirituality,christian mysticism,art to license,book covers christian books,visual art to license,modern contemporary uk british artist,colourist,book cover images,digital images to license;

jenny meehan textural colourful abstract painting afterthoughts

 

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS To license this work contact jenny via her website www.jamartlondon.com

I might well title them in the future, but often ideas take time to emerge, and I don’t push it.

 

A Letter in Mind is running again this year.  

I was very pleased that my work was purchased last year….So good to know it did some worthwhile good, as well as being what it was.  I am entering again this year, and hopefully the work will also come to good use!

http://www.aplaceforcreation.com/a-letter-in-mind/#!

 

“Pushing the Boat out into the Sun”

 fine painting using silica sol mineral paints (soldalit) Keim Soldalit  silica sol mineral paint soldalit, pushing the boat out into the sun by jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

 

“Pushing the Boat out into the Sun” is painted with Silica Sol Mineral Paint (Keim Soldalit, to be exact) on primed board.  It works well… reflects light beautifully.    The style of my painting varies according to medium… this is only right and fitting, and I like what happens with the mineral paints.  I love the metal oxide colours which are needful with working with this type of very alkaline paint.  I love mixing the pigments into the paint, which is very creamy and highly light reflective. And this one certainly has a German Expressionist flavour to it!!!(I suspect when I revisit representational painting more in the future, that this painting might well indicate the type of approach and style I take!)    It brings memories of the mural I produced several years ago.  See here for a You Tube video of the process I used.  Gosh, that was a while back.  It was great to work on a larger scale, and lovely working outside.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je8SouQNIs0

The design for this was more planned in advance than my current methods of painting, but that was a necessity…I couldn’t afford to waste paint or time…

school playground mural painted with silicate mineral paints  Beeck and also Keim Soldalit, silica sol  jenny meehan project led, jamartlondon.

school playground mural painted with silicate mineral paints (Beeck and also Keim Soldalit, silica sol )

John T Freeman led some excellent cartooning workshops, and then transferred (exactly as the children had drawn them) the figures onto the mural, deciding on a pleasing placement.   The underlying Mondrian-ish style design was created by me, and the children helped me with a lot of the painting.

jenny meehan jamartlondon,school mural silicate mineral painting,trafalgar junior school twickenham playground mural project.

Children at Trafalgar Junior School working very hard on the bridging primer application for the mural!

 

That was a few years back,  2011!    I haven’t done a mural since, but that’s simply just the way it goes.  I was very pleased with the result and it still looks great.  It’s pretty hard to get one’s head around working with such a different type of paint, but I learnt a lot.  Now I continue using Keim Soldalit and Keim Optil on smaller scale paintings… mixing into them the slaked pigments, and continuing the journey I started all those years ago.

Photobox Gallery for Poster Prints by Jenny Meehan 

It is rather a slow process, but I am planning to put up more imagery on my Photobox Gallery.  For now, take a look at some of what is already there:

http://www.photoboxgallery.com/gallery/collection?album_id=94169746

Festival surface pattern design by uk fine artist designer,colourful multicoloured surface pattern striped design,

Festival surface pattern design by uk fine artist designer jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS To license this work contact jenny via her website http://www.jamartlondon.com

To buy a “Festival Pattern Print”  from the Jenny Meehan Photobox Gallery.  This is a poster print, and is ordered directly through Photoboxgallery,  and therefore is unsigned.   © Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved  2009.  This “Festival” design was one of my earliest experiments with surface pattern design and I had it printed on a nice tablecloth which I still have.  It is certainly eye catching!.  It’s washed well too.  It was a dye sublimation print on poly cotton.  Looks as good as the day it was printed.

Gosh, my output is very eclectic….However it works in generating new ideas and I am never, ever bored or uninspired!

 

Sorting Out and Looking Back

Never under rate time spent reviewing past work.  I have been sorting through some drawers and boxes and finding all kinds of things which have been “in process” for some considerable time!   I take some encouragement from finding things which still interest me, and let them influence me afresh, making suggestions into what I am working on at the present time.  It’s great fun.

 

block peace mono type jenny meehan blue printing, print making, mono print, blue, pink, markmaking jenny meehan all rights reserved DACS

Block Peace Mono type jenny meehan

 

This piece has already influenced several of the textural acrylic works I am in the midst of, so “thank you very much…my long lost monoprint”.

 

 

 

 

 

Surrey Artists’ Open Studios June 2015.

This was my first time being part of the Surrey Artists’ Open Studios and I enjoyed it very much indeed.  Here are some images of the work I had on show, plus some from the Cass Art “Selfies” Exhibition too:

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

jenny meehan kingston artists open studios events

 

Thoughts on the Open Studios… 

Well,  it was lovely in lots of ways.. I like meeting people and talking about my work, so there was a lot of pleasure there.  I was disappointed that I did not sell one of the paintings… £250 isn’t bad at all for a large painting, and they take a long time to paint… However, I guess one needs the wall space and also an interest in abstraction, plus the ability to engage with abstract painting, which not everyone has.    I sold one print for £20 and that was it…however, I was very pleased about the sale because the person who brought it was taking in the work in a very appreciative way, which is a great pleasure to me.

However, one print isn’t enough to even cover the costs of taking part…I needed to join Surrey Artists’ Open Studios for the year and then also pay to take part in the event on top… I don’t like the idea of paying to simply show what I do, as I have often  said before.  But it seems this is the norm…    On a more positive note, it was wonderful to spend time with some of the other ladies from KAOS!   That was brilliant, and the investment of time, at least was certainly worth it.  I am just not so sure about the money aspect!

I do plan to take part next year, and I will prepare some smaller work on paper, around the £20, £30, £40 £50  mark… these may have more chance of being brought.   My hopes for a collector of fine paintings who didn’t mind investing in one of mine did not materialise.  It has happened before, but it seems that it was not to happen this year.  My disappointment has had a good effect though.  After the initial slough of despond, I have been painting away today (16th June) in the Sun, and have hurled myself full swing into painting as I do…  without much reservation, well, at least at this early stage in the process.  Later come painstaking meditation and contemplation, reflection and consideration…it is very slow in the latter stages, very slow indeed.

The problem with abstraction is that it is very hard for the general public to appreciate the skill which goes into it, whereas when they see a horse which looks like a horse, they are bowled over with admiration.  I realise I just need to accept this, but it can be hard to stomach at times.    I have thought of a few ways that I can continue with my painting and yet still produce little novelties for those that need to see something and know what it is, without needing to invest my time too much in that direction.   I do appreciate that there is a huge need for security when looking at art, that means that a lot of head-knowing, and object recognition needs to take place.  I myself love looking at pictures…indeed, my favourite kind of pictures to look at are miniatures… which may be rather surprising…  One of my favourite occupations which I do from time to time is to pop into Llewllyn Alexander (Fine Paintings) near Waterloo Station.

The Not the Royal Academy Exhibition is on at the moment.     I had something in that a couple of years back, but  my work is too abstract right now…  Again, I would need to make it a little project to paint a few more representational pieces I think if I want to do that again.

LLEWELLYN ALEXANDER (Fine Paintings) LTD
London Gallery Selling Original Paintings in Oil, Watercolour and Pastel by Living ArtistsGallery Open 10am – 7.30pm Tuesday – Saturday inclusive:
124 -126 The Cut, Waterloo, London SE1 8LN UK
(Opposite the Old Vic Theatre)
Tel: 0207 620 1322/1324 Fax: 0207 928 9469

 

Photobox Gallery 

 

http://www.photoboxgallery.com/gallery/collection?album_id=404896014

To buy a “Bruised Reed” poster print, directly from the facility on Photoboxgallery.  This digital artwork..© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved  2008

 

Photography

 

As I have rather a lot of photography in my archives, and I find it helpful to dig it  up from time to time to remember what inspired me enough to take a photograph in the first place, here are some more images from the archives!  A very suitable start, I think, therefore with this rusted old spade!

rusty spade with leaves in the woods mono image jenny meehan all rights reserved DACS,jamartlondon british female contemporary fine artist surrey south west london,

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

temperate house kew gardens structure building,painted metal image with plants, jenny meehan fine art photography,fine artist female contemporary,monochrome image

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography metal structure  in the temperate house at Kew Gardens

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome, mini revolution wheel, polished chrome mini part,shiny metal car part,

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

 

While I don’t focus on photography in the way that I used to, it’s still an important part of my work and I often draw on past imagery to inform what I do in the present.    I often say that my abstract work is not really  “abstract”…I don’t think such a thing exists… it may be mostly non-objective, but the reality is that it is informed by all my looking, thinking and being, and therefore does have subject matter, even though it is not clear what that is, in an exact way.  My eye is informed by all it sees, and any painting I paint, even if no subject is clear, comes from the world and from natural and man made forms, which have impressed themselves into my subconscious, leaving impressions which are deep and often drawn upon to influence any artistic activities I do.  Looking at these images here, reminds me of some of the visual matter which has impressed me.  The interest in surfaces of all kinds, metal (which as a material, has always held a strong interest) and naturally occurring textures and patterns, plus the extensive experimentation with composition which always becomes a necessary part of picture taking/making,  resound through the images of my past art working endeavours, and remind me  not just of where I was, but where my present interests and occupations come from.  The past is very important indeed in art.  I don’t think we pay enough attention to it.  The novelty factor is very transient.  (Though fun to have…of course).

Copyright Information – Jenny Meehan 

Copyright in all images by Jenny Meehan is held by the artist.
Permission must be sought in advance for the reproduction, copying or any other use of any images by Jenny Meehan. Individuals or businesses seeking licenses or permission to use, copy or reproduce any image by Jenny Meehan should, in the first instance, contact Jenny Meehan.
Any persons discovered to be reproducing, copying or using images by Jenny Meehan without prior consent, authorisation or permission will be put on notice that Jenny Meehan is the copyright owner and asked to immediately cease and desist the infringing activity. If a satisfactory response and / or compliance is not forthcoming promptly, the matter will be pursued. For clarification of the laws of copyright, please contact the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS). http://www.dacs.org.uk

Copyright for all visual art by Jenny Meehan is managed by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) in the UK. If you wish to licence a work of art by Jenny Meehan, please contact Jenny Meehan in the first instance to clarify your requirements.

Licencing an image is quick and easy for both parties and is organised through the Design and Artist Copyright Society. (Note, my images are not shown on the “Art image” selection on the Design and Artist Copyright “Art Image” page. This does NOT mean you cannot apply for a licence from DACS…They simply have a very limited sample selection of work in their “Artimage” page!) If you use their online form and attach the low resolution image of my artwork which you have found on the internet, they will know which image you seek permission for.

Also, please of course feel free to contact me if you are looking for a particular type of artwork image, as I have a large archive of images myself. I will also be able to let you know the maximum size the digital image is available at. If you then wish to licence the artwork image, you would then contact the Design and Artist Copyright Society to arrange the licencing agreement according to your requirements. Once paid and agreed, I then supply the high resolution image directly to you.

If you need any further clarification, the DACS website is clear and very helpful indeed, and they would be happy to help you.

DACS
Design and Artist Copyright Society
33 Old Bethnal Green Road
London E2 6AA
Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7336 8811
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7336 8822
email: info@dacs.org.uk
website: http://www.dacs.org.uk
Offices are open 0930 – 1700 Monday through Friday.

 

 

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Well, it is finished!

John T Freeman selected some of the children’s work and arranged the composition of the cartoons on the mural.  He copied the children’s work closely so it retained the original’s quality, and we agreed to add a cat and a rat to bring a little movement into play.  Keim Contact Grobb was used under the cartoons to bring a little texture to the surface, though at this point the uneven nature of the surface did seem quite a challenge!  (Unfortunately I was not able to get permission for the wall to be rendered, which would have been the ideal scenerio).

Keim Contact Grobb was then coated with Keim Soldalit in a very light grey, and John used the same Keim Soldalit in Charcoal Grey for the linear parts of the cartoons.  I had previously busied myself with the thicker lines, which I opted to give a slightly fuzzy edge to, as it wasn’t workable to try and achieve sharp edges on such a rough wall, and optically, there was very little point in doing that anyway.  The soft edges worked very well with what are radiant, and yet gentle colours. 

 The colours are getting a lot of comments already;  people do seem to pick up on the particular quality of the mineral paint used, even though the surface changed from totally matt to a very slight sheen  after coating with the Keim Anti-Graffiti Coating.  The cartoons are also providing a lot of enjoyment, and the children will be having a competition soon to come up with a name for the mural.  John T Freeman and myself will enjoy looking at those I am sure. 

Some of the children are working on mural and mineral paint related activities at the school with the Art Co-ordinator, who I hope is taking some photographs which I can post up here later on!  Keim were fantastic in providing some very interesting information about Keim mineral paints, the history, and technical information, and I was also able to provide some materials on colour theory and design which should come in handy. Though I worked on this project voluntarily, I have to say, as an experience, it was well worth the effort and I hope to do something similar in the future.

It’s so important that our children learn about different kinds of materials and what the advantages and disadvantages are…I do think that through the project they have been able to experience using natural paint in a very relevant and creative way.  It’s been a great project, and I only wish I had more time available to do more of this kind of thing.  I do have another mural on the horizon,  and it will be very good to use what has been learnt through this one for the next.  I am also making a short video of the whole process to pop up on You Tube.  It hasn’t got anything that isn’t common sense on it, but it might prove helpful to another school who maybe would like to work with mineral silicate paint for an ecologically friendly mural at some time. 

John T Freeman’s website:  www.johntfreeman.co.uk

Jenny Meehan’s website: www.jennymeehan.co.uk

Video of Mural Project:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Je8SouQNIs0

Rain, Rain,Rain.

I just want to put the final coating of Keim 694 Waterbased semi-permanent anti-graffiticoating ON THE MURAL.  It’s sitting here in front of me, but cannot be used “if rain could fall within 5 to 6 hours”.  The way the last few days have been going, all my expected times and days have melted into the ground and evaporated!  I haven’t even seen the mural since John last came in to finish the cartoons, so I haven’t even seen it finished yet!  Hopefully one day next week….

Once I have coated the mural with the anti-graffiticoating, I will be working on a presentation on the whole process for the school.  And then the work really will be finished.  I have to say a really big thank you to Keim Mineral Paints again for their part in the project, which in the end turned out to be very significant, because I found their silica-sol paint “Soldalit” of great use for the linear parts of the painting, and John used this for the cartoons too.   I now intend to continue to use Soldalit for other exterior murals I paint, as the colour range is fantastic, and though I like to mix up my own colours, (as I did for the colour areas of the Trafalgar Mural, using the Beeck Full Colour mineral paints), it does save a lot of time if the colours are already mixed.

I’ve learnt a lot from this project….

1.  I love and hate the weather, but it’s kind of nice to be subject to it.

2. Some companies have great customer service, and others need to improve.  However great, you can only build on the foundations below you.  That means, every little person matters.

3.When you paint murals on party walls, it can take a long time and a lot of effort to get permission to do so, but if you use a porus silicate mineral paint, there is no good reason for refusal, as the wall can “breath”, so no damp issues arise.

4. Don’t assume anything

5. Children are worth working with.  My thanks to the lovely children who painted with me, and to all those wonderful artists who produced such amazing cartoons under the expert and sensitive guidance of John T Freeman.  If the mural was bigger, all the cartoons would be in the mural…every single one.

6. It will ALWAYS take longer than you think, and extensive preparation, including research, is always worth it.

7.  The composition has to be right.  If it’s not, don’t bother.

8.  Silicate Mineral Paint offers the best colour quality possible, far superior to acrylic paint in terms of its ability to reflect light.   Having spent hours looking at the difference, I have no doubt in my mind about this matter. It’s beautiful.  It is more demanding to use, but it’s worth it. And Keim Soldalit, their sol-silicate paint is much easier to use than the Beeck.

9. Take the rough with the smooth…In this case, quite literally.  The wall surface was rough!  Painting straight lines on such a surface doesn’t make much sense, but as they say, “where there’s a will, there’s a way” and nothing’s impossible.

10. Give generously, receive generously.

It might seem a bit early to put this down, but as the rain is stopping me from going any further, I might as well do this now.  I would like in the future to put together something on practical techniques for mural painting with silicate mineral paints to help others who might consider using this type of paint for exterior or interior murals, but to be honest, I have so much happening right now I cannot see myself being able to do this for sometime.

The Keim website is worth a look.  https://www.keim.com/en-gb/keim-library/the-mineral-principle/

They have been stellar in their customer service, and helped immensely.  I’m very grateful.

I now have work to sort out for exhibition at the Rose Theatre in October, Gallery 63 in September, The CornerHOUSE in December and later on Leatherhead theatre in May 2012, which is great, but means the mural work has to stop for a while.  I am working on a mural in a garden, just a simple grey and white one  .I would like to do another exterior mural at the school later next year.  I’m also in the process of applying for the Artists Access to University Scheme, at Kingston University in order to develop my practice.  That should be enough for now,  plus running the house, and all that domestic bliss!

By way of a little deviation, some images of other things I have been creating!

 

 

 

I can’t resist the odd photograph now and again.

Pencil sketch done at West Dean College during last stay recently

Another part of the journey….

 

 

Thankfully with a great team working together, we covered the prepared wall with the Beeck Quartz Filler quite rapidly.  It is quite time consuming, mostly because of the dabbing action needed for such a bumpy surface, but we loved using the paint.

It was Mufti Day when we painted on the bridging primer, and so, as you can see, there is not a uniform in sight.  Just as well really as the paint did tend to go in unexpected places….I have to say, not because the painters were not being sensible, its just the paint seemed to have a life of its own!

I have to say I was very impressed with how quickly those painters who worked with me picked up the way to control the paint…It is quite runny and it’s more like a stain, and so they sure did need to know how to control it!

The decking was very comfortable to sit on, and as you can see, we used rubber gloves to protect our hands and plastic goggles too.  There’s nothing unsafe or toxic about the paint, it’s just very alkaline and I know from experience that it dries out your skin, and can sting, though I didn’t find this much with the paint, it was more just the fixative alone.  In a school setting we have to do things properly though, and the goggles meant that there were no worries with regard to paint splashing in eyes.  However, to be honest, one has to manipulate the paint in such a way that you wouldn’t tend to splash it about anyway.

I started the mural using the Beeck Silicate Mineral paints, and they were fine, but when I got to the linear parts I had discovered Keim Mineral Paints, and most particularly, their Soldalit, which is a third generation sol-silicate paint.  This pain was much easier to handle..a very slight difference in consistency but it made all the difference with the lines.  It was slightly more viscous.  If I were to paint a mural like this again I would just use the Soldalit, as the difference in consistency made it easier to use.

From the Keim website:

“SOL-SILICATE MINERAL PAINTS

Recent developments in mineral silicate paint technology have seen the introduction of sol-silicate mineral paintswhich not only utilise potassium silicate but also silica sol.  Silica binders are ‘colloids’, a term originating from the Greek word for glue –‘kolla’.  These particles have excellent viscosity, meaning they are well absorbed into a surface and once dry the particles firmly bind to the surfaces.  The addition of the silica sol, enhances the already superior adhesion of mineral paints and increases their scope of use to include application onto previously painted surfaces.”

Yes, and an additional bonus, not utilised in this case, as it was silicate on silicate, but something which I will certainly experiment with in different contexts when the mural is done.

Again from the Keim Mineral Paint website:

 

MINERAL APPEARANCE

Mineral Paints have a flat, matt finish, however the crystal structure provides excellent light reflectance which gives a bright, clean apperance.  In addition, through the use of earth oxide pigments, there is no colour fade – proven on buildings which were been decorated over 100 years ago where there is still no visible colour fade and no breakdown of the coating itself.  Keim Paints are inherently resistant to mould and fungal growth due to their high alkalinity, (pH is approximately 12.3), and therefore can provide long term resistance to mould and fungal growth.

 

Edit note:  My old website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk is no longer living, so if you would like to see what I am doing currently, then please follow the link to my new website which is http://www.jamartlondon.com.   www.jamartlondon.com

 

Quite missing the mural, having not painted anything on it for a while.  A bit of a gap now in progress, but more to be done over the Summer holidays.  I am very pleased that Keim Mineral Paints Ltd in the UK have kindly donated some charcoal grey Soldalit, which has solved a problem for me, as the Beeck Full Colour black plus white was a very bluey black, and not exactly what I wanted.  I could have fiddled around with it, but it’s all time.

I have decided to coat the mural, when finished, with  another useful product from Keim Mineral Paints “Keim 694” which is a waterbased semi-permanent anti-graffiti coating, based on acryl co-polymers and waxes.  The advantage for me is that it is not solvent based, which I prefer, and also that it may be applied by brush.  It needs two coats. It also comes with with plenty of information with regard to aftercare. The paint is hydro-phobic without a coating,  and though it takes a while to fully petrify, it will indeed go rock hard.  However, as the mural is in a playground, I felt it wise to use the coating on it.

I have to say, I cannot fault the customer service received from Keim Mineral Paints Ltd, and this is very refreshing, having experienced some dreadful customer service earlier on in the process of the mural.  Unfortunately, I understand from several painters in my locality, that is is common for women not to be treated as professionally as they should be by some suppliers in the construction industry.  This was not something I have come across before, and  it was rather a disappointment, and certainly not something I expected.

Keim Mineral Paints however, have  delivered excellent customer service, and the range of modern silicates, each with their specific applications, is quite amazing.  It’s because of the good and sound business policies clearly in place which treat both the big and small customer with the same amount of respect, treat women professionally, and put the customer first that I am singing their praises.  I really appreciated it.  Any business which wants to grow in this current economic climate needs to take customer service very seriously, and the intelligent ones will do exactly that.

Well, it’s a great advantage to be able to touch type, and to be able to do so very quickly!  However, I need to get on, so next blog entry will be  a while away now.  I understand that one child put on his end of year review form that working on the mural was the highlight of his year.  That’s why painter’s should be in schools engaging with the next generation of artists.  And, our society does need artists, as much as we need air to breath.

MINERAL APPEARANCE Mineral Paints have a flat, matt finish, however the crystal structure provides excellent light reflectance which gives a bright, clean apperance.  In addition, through the use of earth oxide pigments, there is no colour fade – proven on buildings which were been decorated over 100 years ago where there is still no visible colour fade and no breakdown of the coating itself.  Keim Paints are inherently resistant to mould and fungal growth due to their high alkalinity, (pH is approximately 12.3), and therefore can provide long term resistance to mould and fungal growth.

 

Thinking about air and the environment, take a look at the Keim website, and paint your buildings with mineral paint!

https://www.keimpaintshop.co.uk/

 

https://www.keim.com/en-gb/

 

Text quoted from the Keim Mineral Paint website:

“All KEIM Mineral Paints are generically similar and are based on a mineral silicate paint system that was first granted a royal patent in 1878.

This comprises a liquid potassium silicate paint binder with natural earth oxide pigments and natural mineral fillers, such as feldspar. Mineral silicate paints penetrate the mineral substrate onto which they are applied, such as renders and concrete, forming a permanent, long lasting chemical crystalline bond with the substrate.

KEIM Mineral Paints contain neither solvents nor any petro-chemical derivatives, are inherently non-combustible, and do not give off any toxic gases.”

Also:

“SOL-SILICATE MINERAL PAINTS
Recent developments in mineral silicate paint technology have seen the introduction of sol-silicate mineral paints which not only utilise potassium silicate but also silica sol. Silica binders are ‘colloids’, a term originating from the Greek word for glue –‘kolla’. These particles have excellent viscosity, meaning they are well absorbed into a surface and once dry the particles firmly bind to the surfaces. The addition of the silica sol, enhances the already superior adhesion of mineral paints and increases their scope of use to include application onto previously painted surfaces.

And the bit I enjoy immensely, in relation to my own painting!

“MINERAL APPEARANCE
Mineral Paints have a flat, matt finish, however the crystal structure provides excellent light reflectance which gives a bright, clean apperance. In addition, through the use of earth oxide pigments, there is no colour fade – proven on buildings which were been decorated over 100 years ago where there is still no visible colour fade and no breakdown of the coating itself. Keim Paints are inherently resistant to mould and fungal growth due to their high alkalinity, (pH is approximately 12.3), and therefore can provide long term resistance to mould and fungal growth. “

The finish is heavenly and it is very noticeable how light reflective the paint is.   I may prove pretty resistant to mould and fungal growth myself if I keep forgetting to wear gloves when I am painting though!

keim soldalit sol silicate paint hand mixing up colours for use in fine art abstract paintings by jenny meehan

keim soldalit sol silicate paint hand mixing up colours for use in fine art abstract paintings by jenny meehan

Image was added in 2018 when reviewing post.

I have been working with the Keim paint for several years now!

 The colour areas of the mural have come along, and I have had some good weather.  One day of last week was crazy….The sun kept popping in and out, and I not only had short, sharp, showers of rain, but some hailstones too!  This made me very glad to have the bubblewrap protective layer…It also meant that I could carry on painting even in the rain, as it was so light and transparent that it didn’t get in the way at all, and I had plenty of light.  It even took the chill out of the air…All in all, it made quite a cosy working environment!  

I’m going to avoid sharing an image of the design for now….mainly because even when the main linear elements are done, the mural won’t be in it’s final state until the cartoons have reaped their havoc with it!  The image here shows most of the main colour areas.  The remaining area (the ships base) will be carried out during the next stage of painting, with a couple more enthusiastic children to assist with the process.  I will post some images of the children working soon, but consent is needed first before publishing on the internet.

The Mural

The mural design is based loosely on the work of the painter
Piet Mondrian.    Over time, his painting
developed  away from the  representational  becoming increasingly more abstract.  He narrowed down the elements of the image
further and further until in the end he produced   geometric paintings which were comprised of
coloured rectangles intersected and divided by a flat grid of black lines.   Mondrian’s importance in art history lies in
his development of “pure” abstraction.
The mural design shows two sailing ships; one on the left, which heads
straight towards the viewer, and one on the right, which is perpendicular to
it. The ships are arranged like this to symbolise Nelson’s battle tactic for
the battle of Trafalgar; instead of conducting the battle so that his ships
approached the enemy ships face on, (as was the more common, traditional,
approach) he decided to get his ships to approach the enemy ships from a right
angle, perpendicular to the enemy ships. This meant they could break into the
enemy lines, cutting off and overwhelming the enemy centre and rear, before
their vanguard (leading ships) could turn and assist.

Because schools are ever changing, constantly growing and
developing communities, I felt it was important to suggest a sense of process
in the mural and this is  suggested in
the ever increasing oval shapes, which start small from the right hand side,  and get bigger near the front of the ship:  Trafalgar is a place of growth and
development, of each person’s potential having the opportunity to become
realised more fully, and of having the structure and  support needed in order for that to happen.  I have also depicted in light grey an
indication of the underlying grid on which the design was constructed, in order
to suggest the idea of a work in progress.

Some of the children’s cartoons will liven the whole thing up!

An important part of
the project will be educational input with regard to the reasons for and value
of using ecologically friendly paints, and in particular the unique qualities
of silicate mineral paint, which has been developed over the years into a very versatile and exciting paint.  I would like to thank
Keim Mineral Paints Ltd, in particular for their prompt and helpfully delivered technical
support, and the provision of information  and printed and presentation materials , all
of which have been particularly helpful  in enhancing the educational dimension of the
project. The mural will be coated with the Keim anti-graffiti coating, which is just what I was looking for.
I would also like to thank Mike Wye and Associates for technical advice and assistance. Cornish Lime were also helpful in this respect.

Colour areas of the mural in progress

Well, this Tuesday was another fine day with respect to the weather (unlike today!).   The wall we are painting the mural on is thankfully not exposed to direct sunlight in the mornings, which means we don’t have to worry about the paint drying too quickly. Not really an issue for this layer, but when we do the colours it could be.   On Tuesday, myself and my team of two boys and two girls from Trafalgar  painted the first layer of BEECK Quartz Filler, a bridging primer, over the surface of the wall.  I couldn’t have done it without them, and what a great team they were.  We talked about the paint and the ingredients, and the children loved using the paint.  They loved the smell, which is like toothpaste, and as we were using the bottoms of plastic milk cartons as containers, the paint was then referred to as “milk”.  They even missed some of their playtime and wanted to carry on for the rest of the morning! We had a great time.  Ideally I would have liked the wall to be rendered first, but this was not allowed, and would have cost more money too.  The bridging primer does give some smoothness to the surface, but it’s still quite uneven.  However, having seen several other murals on the net with silicate on brick,  this doesn’t worry me, not for this simple design anyway.

Such was the enthusiastic response that I realise, with hindsight, that the children’s painting shirts were not really sufficient protection, (!!) and I just hope those parents will forgive me for their children coming home with evidence of their painting activities still intact on their clothing.  I think it should come out easily though…there’s no acrylic or anything which would make it hard to get out of clothing.  The children also wore rubber gloves and goggles for protection (I’m not sure the goggles were really that necessary, but they looked rather scientific!)  I’ll post some images up soon.

By the end of the morning the whole area was covered.  Everyone worked really hard and enjoyed the process.  Amazing work!  Over the half term I’ll be marking up some of the design and then some of the children will help me with the colour areas.  The paint takes a good 12 hours to dry enough for a second coat, and it seems to take a couple of weeks to fully harden, (based on samples at home) but there’s no rush.  I’ve worked out the colours, apart from one which I can’t decide on.  I’ll be painting the design on a smaller scale on paper over the half term and post it up here soon.  I’m also thinking about some activities that the children might like to participate in related to colour theory and design, which can be used if required by the school.

Images below inserted at a later date!

mineral paint mural in primary school by artist jenny  meehan

trafalgar junior school silicate mineral paint mural

mineral paint mural in twickenham trafalgar junior school

 

silicate mineral paint mural twickenham artist jenny meehan

trafalgar junior school silicate mineral paint mural by artist Jenny Meehan .. Characters are copies of some of the childrens artwork produced in a drawing workshop tutored by John T Freeman, who then  placed and transferred the drawings onto the mural

trafalgar junior school silicate mineral paint mural by artist Jenny Meehan .. Characters are copies of some of the childrens artwork produced in a drawing workshop tutored by John T Freeman, who then placed and transferred the drawings onto the mural

trafalgar junior school silicate mineral paint mural by artist Jenny Meehan .. Characters are copies of some of the childrens artwork produced in a drawing workshop tutored by John T Freeman, who then  placed and transferred the drawings onto the mural

trafalgar junior school silicate mineral paint mural by artist Jenny Meehan .. Characters are copies of some of the childrens artwork produced in a drawing workshop tutored by John T Freeman, who then placed and transferred the drawings onto the mural

 

After a considerable amount of planning and thought, now the mural project for Trafalgar Junior School is more tangibly underway. Both good and bad experiences of customer services with suppliers has been an education in itself, but I am glad to, FINALLY (after some delay), be able to push the work ahead.  John T Freeman delivered some excellent cartooning workshops to groups of children in the school, and I understand that the children who received the benefit of his skill and expertise in the matter are now passing it on to other groups of children too. I must say, the children’s work is amazing, and I can see very distinctly the way in which John’s input has influenced their drawing skills and powers of expression, resulting in work which is lively and original.  John was also interviewed during assembly, and shared with the children many things about his work as an artist, showing some of his work, and also bringing along a few interesting objects to talk about.  Both the assembly and the workshops were thoroughly enjoyed by the children. 

I’m currently working on some educational materials for the project with regard to the ecological issues which are an important part of the whole thing.  Yes, I love the paint, aesthetically it pleases me so much I chose it for that, but not that alone.  It’s a great opportunity for the children to learn about paint as part of their environmental studies, and if I had more time, I would probably do a lot more in this area.  However, for now,  I will put together a few materials,  some samples of different types of paint, ideas, visual resources, that type of thing.  

Some examples of children’s work from the cartooning workshops by John T Freeman:

All the children’s cartooning looks fantastic,  and looking at their work, I want to spend some time talking to them about it, because it all looks very interesting!

Artist?  Female?  Small Budget?

For some companies, this spells bad news, not worth bothering with, etc.  I’ll resist the temptation to name and shame, it doesn’t appeal to me.  Still fuming, and keen to let off steam, I’ve decided though to focus on the positive.  In this economic climate, good customer service is important and when it’s good it’s worth shouting about.  So buying supplies for the mural project has been an education in itself in some ways, and I’d like to take this opportunity to pass on some recommendations for anyone who might be thinking of buying natural or mineral based paints.  Thankfully I have more positives to report than negatives.   So I’ll start with Mike Wye and Associates.

Helpful, prompt, great range of products and excellent information.   Keen to help, interested, understanding the value of a school mural project with ecologically friendly paint,  demonstrating good customer service and a friendly and helpful manner.  Much appreciated.

See:   http://www.mikewye.co.uk/

It’s convinced me that next time I decorate I need to change my paint!  Trouble is I’m so busy right now that decorating my own house doesn’t come into it.  It’ very important for companies to be female friendly I think, and also to give prompt responses to enquiries and such like, and my experiences with this company have been very positive indeed.

Today the children are having  John T Freeman, into school.  He’ll be interviewed during assembly and the children will learn about his work as an artist and why he does what he does.  John will also be doing some workshops with the children on cartooning…I can’t wait to see their work!  I’ll post some images up shortly.  The children’s work will be used by John in the latter stages of the mural painting.  John will be adapting and composing their images which will populate the mural, and bring some life to it.   Some of the children will also be doing some activities  which centre around ecological considerations…Basically exploring the question “Why Are We Using Natural Paint?”  The children involved in the painting will also learn more about paint and painting from me, about pigments, colours, types of paint, whatever they are interested in.

I’m currently still making decisions about colours, but most of the planning work is done now.  Here’s some images of the project so far….

Using the computer and a grid for constructing templates

Mural Planning Using A Computer To Assist

 
 
Materials, Equipment, and A Messy Studio - Jenny Meehan

Using natural paints for this mural has basically converted me!

 
 
Experimenting with Different Tones and Colour Combinations at the Design Stage

A balancing act of colour in progress

 
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