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I ran out of time in my last post to tell you more about a project I was pleased to be part of.  So better late than never!

Collect Connects’ Artwork for the Tate Modern

This was a Collect Connect project (Alban Low) with Harvey Wells, Kevin Acott and the team at
Queen Mary University of London

From the Collect Connect site:

“In 2016 we created our Relationship Map for Mental Health Awareness Week. It was a large scale artwork that charted people’s life connections using the London Tube map. After its success we’re back in 2019 with a new interactive map that will be exhibited at the Tate Modern from 11th-16th June. It will be part of the Ideas in Motion: borders, bodies, and the universe exhibition at the Tate Modern, Blavatnik Building, Level 5, Bankside, London SE1 9TG.
More info at https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/tate-exchange/workshop/ideas-motion-borders-bodies-and-universe”

https://collectconnect.blogspot.com/2019/05/emotion-at-tate-modern.html?fbclid=IwAR1jDo_JkBBElxSUvrJPaFjcIs8FpLoEd31M2BZIEy3JzBqsWOsG62uzyLU

 

Our artwork is eMotion: Emotional Transitions in Healthcare. Ill-health requires us to make transitions: to move emotionally, spiritually, socially, physically. We adjust from being ‘healthy’ to being ‘ill’, from ‘independence’ to ‘dependence’ and back again. The project highlights the joys and fear of impermanence, of the changes that occur every second, minute and hour of our lives. It embraces movement as normal, as part of the flow of life – something that should neither be resisted nor forced.

We’ve built a huge interactive floor map, in the style of a tube map, which has ‘end stations’ labelled with key points of ‘stasis’. The ‘station stops’ in between are open for people to explore how they navigate these transitions. We would like your help in creating a map so that visitors at the Tate can navigate a path along these routes of transition.”

quoted from the Collect Connect website

Connections on the interactive floor map reflected journeys between two poles;

Health – Illness

Dependence – Independence

Home – Hospital

Life – Death

Young – Old

Hope – Fear

Certainty – Uncertainty

Me – You

Doctor – Patient

There were three blank “stops” for each line.  Artists, including myself, made our contributions concept wise and these were made into options for people to arrange so they could connect the concepts in the way they felt meaningful. (For example: what does it feel like to be in the middle between Hope to Fear, or closer to Hope, or closer to Fear. You could write something like: Hope – Last Minute Corner – First Game of Season – One Nil Up – Fear.)

Some of my ideas were used and it was lovely to contribute.

 

Here were my submissions:

Life – Death

Grateful Reception – Intimate Connection – Anxious Separation

and

Me – You

Expecting – Meeting – Expecting

 

Doctor – Patient

Controlling – Enquiring – Seeking

 

Hope – Fear

Holding Wonder Lightly – Trying to Grasp All – Losing Sense of Self

 

Dependence – Independence

Vulnerability and Need – Gathering Resources – Freedom to Be

 

Certainty – Uncertainty

Really? – Faith – Trust

 

Young – Old

Tender in Expectations – Placid Pivotal Places – Facing the Realities

 

Home – Hospital

Where it Starts – Where it Happens –  Where it Ends

 

Health – Illness

Moving and Being – Maintaining Momentum – Slipping Down Stagnantly

 

 

eMotion: Emotional Transitions in Healthcare
Ill-health requires us to make transitions: to move emotionally, spiritually, socially, physically. We adjust from being ‘healthy’ to being ‘ill’, from ‘independence’ to ‘dependence’ and back again. Track your personal route from illness to wellbeing on an interactive map of the healthcare system.

Tate Modern also have this, which looks interesting.  As someone with osteoarthritis….(and a nice new total knee replacement to go with it!) impaired mobility has been part of my own experience.  Thankfully at present, I am fully mobile, but I did have a two year period when that was not the case.

Creating without Constraint: Arthritis and Art
Experience this interactive workshop exploring the relationship between impaired mobility and artistic expression. Our researchers will guide you in a ‘journey’ inside the joints with activities simulating the restriction of movement. The display will include the work of Renoir and Pickering, two artists who lived with arthritis, to explore how art can overcome disability. Also, emerging painter Rebecca Ivatts will give a talk about her collaboration with Pickering.”

I looked around and chatted, having excellent conversations and learning lots, as well as sharing my own perspectives and experience of osteoarthritis.  I’m particularly interested in chronic pain management, as this is something I studied a fair bit over the two years before my knee replacement surgery out of necessity.  I don’t have pain in my knee anymore, but my elbows, wrists and hands have decided to sometimes advertise themselves in the pain department. I’m getting pretty experienced at moving my mind in other directions now!

 

Big and Small Names at the Tate Modern

The novel thing is, I can now say my name has been present at the Tate Modern!  Yes, printed, and there for all to see.  Only because of a small contribution, but there all the same.  And names mean a lot to us, so just the little printed presence of my name at the Tate Modern can bring me at least a little smile!

People like their names in places…Yes they do. It’s interesting that the now Blavatnik extension/building at Tate Modern was named the “Switch House” when it was opened in June 2016. I do prefer the original name. It holds some relevance to the history of the building which I think is always a good thing.  The now Blavatnik Building was originally named the Switch House to reflect the previous use of the site for a power station.  It’s very interesting that you can see two circular terrace areas when you look downwards.  You can see the Oil Tank Wall, which is an interesting element of design.  The Oil Tank Wall encloses two large circular terraces, to the south and east of the building right in front of the new gallery entrance and café. The Oil Tank wall is an above-grade extrusion of the existing below ground Oil Tanks.  I love it.  It’s a strong feature which heightens your awareness of the past.  I think the building was always meant to strongly echo its past as well as its future…because it has an interesting history.

Tate Modern’s The Turbine Hall is housed in the former Bankside Power Station, designed originally by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (He was the architect of Battersea Power Station too!). It was built between 1947 and 1963. Before it was developed the steel framed brick clad building with it’s 99m chimney was divided into three main areas: the Turbine Hall, the Boiler House to the north, and the switch house to the south.

So you see, bearing in mind the Turbine Hall, the Boiler House and the Switch House…yes, a nice trio.  It is a bit sad that the Switch House was renamed.  I guess when someone donates a lot of money, they like to have their name included.  And it’s kind of understandable.  Because I got a tiny bit of a kick out of my little name being in the Tate Modern, so I am sure the same kind of kick, but a little bit larger, applies!  So the name was changed, a year after the opening, and reflected Blavatnik’s wishes. Bearing in mind the size of the donation, I think it was probably diplomatic to reflect Blavatnik’s wishes.  Nicholas Serota, who stepped down as the Tate director at the end of May 2017 said he was “delighted the new building now bears his name”. Blavatnik made the Tate pledge in 2011 and the Blavatnik Family Foundation’s donation made up a substantial amount of the £260m needed to complete it.

So I do wonder if the name “Switch House” was meant to be it’s proper name… I’m sure it was… It would be in accordance with the other buildings.  Yet Len Blavatnik, (an industrialist born in Ukraine) came up with the cash in 2017 when Tate Modern found that the new Switch House extension had left it with a £30m funding shortfall. So I shouldn’t be surprised that a year after it opened, the Switch House was renamed the Blavatnik Building.  And I’m quite happy with my own name in very small print on an super contribution to the “Ideas in Motion: borders, bodies, and the universe exhibition”.

https://www.ft.com/content/449ad16e-20dd-11e6-aa98-db1e01fabc0c

USSR-born billionaire made one of largest donations in Tate’s history to help fund building temporarily named Switch House

What Style is that Painting?

This was one of the questions I was asked at this year’s Kingston Artists’ Open Studios.

The terms I tend to use for describing my main thrust in painting are bouncing within the realms of the following terms: Lyrical abstraction, abstraction lyrique, tachism, tachisme, action painting, abstract expressionism, art informal, informalism.  But these are terms which relate to particular movements in the past, and serve as a way of describing and communicating what to expect with my own painting, and not anything more than that.  And it is the case that within my own realm of art working, I move between several styles…  This is part of the process of development.  I think I have written about this in a previous post.  It is a bad thing to narrow down artistic creation in order to adhere or fit into a style.  If it happens it will happen naturally, and evolve that way. It will grow and develop, playing and toying with different styles and approaches en route!

It is the case, that when using paint, things now are tending to fall within the bounds of my approach, which is process led and focused on formal elements and experimenting with materials. What comes through is a materialisation, a becoming, of my self.  Which references my life experience and emotional and spiritual journey.  Mostly I like to let things happen, rather than plan.  But there is a lot of unconscious planning which happens I think.  There is a lot of emerging!!!

Historical terms and descriptions of styles are good for searching for the kind of paintings you like, and there are plenty of movements which it is helpful for the keen collector of art to educate themselves in.  My own preoccupation is with the formal elements of the painting, and a process led approach.  My preferred terminology for my own work is that of British romantic, poetic, lyrical, abstract and expressionistic painting.  I like the romantic, because of the way it conveys both individuality and intensity of emotion and the importance of these.  I loved my studies of the Romantic poets when at University, and also of the paintings of Turner, which were studies as part of a couple of painting courses at West Dean College given by John T Freeman, (who I credit, among others, with role of welcoming me into the realms of painting as a way of life/vocational activity!)

Yet “style” can be a trap.  I believe a consistency can be found which comes from the person themselves. Styles may change but the interactions between mediums and styles are what keep an artist’s work dynamic.  I don’t need to stick to one style… It’s  more a matter of honing my focus and being reflective and innovative. Sometimes that makes an artist’s work rather an eclectic mix.  Diverse at times. That’s good, not bad.  Don’t worry about how your work would look on a supermarket shelf.  Don’t worry about if you are consistent enough.  Do your work for your self, unless you particularly want to do it for other people.  That’s fine too.  But exploration, discovery, experimentation, and going beyond what you can see or anticipate or plan…. These keep things exciting imo.

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design?

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design? If so, then take a look at my website jamartlondon.com, for a start.

My artwork is particularly suitable for themes of: faith, religion, philosophy, Christian, church, all faith traditions, inter-faith, spirituality, the subconscious, psychoanalytic themes, mindfulness, contemplative practices, healing, health, both physical and mental, trauma recovery, metaphysical and psychological focused writings, the devotional life, and many other subjects.

Indeed, pretty much any subject matter or theme which benefits from a more abstract graphic image; one which also conveys basic feelings and ideas in an open and experimental manner; would benefit from it’s clarity of communication being enhanced by one of my art images.

From the lyrical abstraction of some of abstract expressionist style textured paintings, to the geometric abstraction clear edged imagery, which I also produce, the value of non representational imagery in book cover design which is both colourful and interesting, and stimulates the eye with colour and striking composition, cannot be under estimated.

If you are looking for something particular, do contact me, because I only display a small amount on the internet and may even be able to create something specific to your needs, or be able to locate something from my extensive archives which meets your need.

DACS administrate my licensing agreements and organise the use of my art work images quickly and conveniently. They are very helpful and can guide you through the process if you are unfamiliar with it. I normally follow their guidelines with respect to the fees for licensing, as these are set in line with the industry standard.

DACS do offer a good reduction in fees for registered charities. Occasionally it may be possible for slightly reduced rates to be negotiated in other circumstances.

To find out more about how you can arrange to use my imagery, see here:

https://www.dacs.org.uk/licensing-works/frequently-asked-questions#FAQ122

 

 

Artist’s Statement – Jenny Meehan

Artist Statements are funny things…Mine does change over time and circumstances.  Which is in accordance with my priorities and focus at the time of writing. This is no bad thing.  Often it is very helpful as the need to critically assess and evaluate my vision and objectives, as well as look back into the past and reflect on how things are evolving is a useful practice which needing to write an artist statement helps.  Here is an example of an early artist statement I wrote many years back:

I have been creating two and three dimensional art since 2005. Art is about exploration. I view mine as a natural and evolving process which is primarily to do with the emotions and spirit, though I do enjoy playing with concepts too. My Christian faith, relationships, and artistic contemplation and production are the main driving forces in my life.

Trees and plants, metal objects, the human figure, and many different types of man- made constructions, are subject matter I favour. I like to explore different styles of expression using a range of media; primarily paint, photography, poetry, metal and paper. The brokenness of human experience fascinates me, but also the potential for growth and renewal. My work has a positive outlook, as I think that it is often through suffering, touched by God’s grace, that the beauty of the human soul is revealed. The idea of strength combined with vulnerability is particularly attractive to me.

My art is a sacramental practice, and the mystery of faith and its reality beyond our human rational mindset is something which interests me. I also see my work as an articulation of fragmentary experience; it’s how I make sense of the world. Alongside my general fine art practice I am interested in liturgical art using a variety of media. Since 2008 I have put most of my creative energies into developing my skills with paint, which I love. Intensely.”

I quite like this one…It gives a gentle overview, which includes a lot about spirituality and faith and the importance inspiration wise of my religious tradition.  It’s not very focused on any particular current project of the time…I wanted to keep it very broad and tried to cover a large area with it.  Maybe a little too much of an overview I think, looking at it now.  However, the purpose is important, and it was written for my website at the time, so in that sense I think it was a pretty well fitting piece of writing.

 

Lovely West Dean College and West Dean Gardens!

west dean gardens west dean, drawing by jenny meehan

Drawing done in West Dean Gardens

Drawing by Jenny Meehan in West Dean Gardens Sussex.

Another one….

drawing by jenny meehan in West Dean Gardens Sussex

Another one!

I will post some photos at some point.

This year I was experimenting with Collagraphs.   Very nice medium… Right up my street.  I have been working with black a fair bit in my studio tent recently…. experimenting, so the rich black ink was a welcome sight and the textures are always so dynamic in terms of the marks they can make.  So it was a delight.  Take a look on my instagram to see some of what I produced, though as is always, I have taken home a lot of work to do which will keep me on track in that area for some time.  I’m not interested in working large or producing editions…Small unique prints are more interesting and why produce more of the same?

https://www.instagram.com/jamartlondon_jennymeehan/

 

Shape Open 2019

Very please to be taking part in this year’s Shape Open Exhibition.  It’s great my two years of increasing physical disability before a much needed knee replacement proved so fruitful in unexpected ways.  Not easy, but to take part in the Shape Open 2019 with my work “What Does this Symbol Say?” feels very appropriate, because the creation of my artwork is intimately connected with my own experience of disability.

https://www.shapearts.org.uk/Blog/shape-open-2019-artists-announced

Inclusive International Symbol of Access Design by Jenny Meehan

Here is the text I submitted:

“My re-design of the International Symbol of
Access is inspired by my own need to rethink
what disability is due to a period of restricted
mobility prior to knee replacement surgery.
Finding myself in need of using an accessible
toilet, for example, helped me to realise how
inappropriate the existing symbol was.
I’d like people viewing the work to add their
thoughts as to what it expresses to them. If the
ISA was to change, this could have a powerful
impact in many societies and open up
dialogue and awareness in a very beneficial
way.
Opportunities to rethink are intimately linked
with with conversation about disability, and art
is a key player in helping peoples awareness
to increase through engaging with new ways
of seeing and experiencing things. In my
view, the focus for progression in all things
needs to encompass a strong sense of moving
forwards and upwards, and this new icon has this. ”

 

The reason why I think my design is a good option:

It’s got the right angle of what was the seat of the wheelchair and also the round circle which was the wheel.  It has the three main elements of the existing wheelchair symbol but rearranged and reinterpreted. Open arms convey welcome and reception of.

My symbol has also the following strengths:

It retains the circle, helping recognition, as society adjusts from the old to the new
It works in both static and mobile situations (ie previous crit of the dynamic wheelchair version)
It suggests refuge (a circle as something which encompasses and surrounds in a protective way)
It suggests entering into…. key for accessibility…the pointed end of the v shape enters into the inside of the circle
It suggests freedom…. The arms (v shape) are outstretched and open. This is freedom for the disabled person
the feeling of this icon is buoyant and expansive…
the small circle and upturned V shape resemble the top half of a person’s body, meaning it still contains the two key elements from the old symbol, a circle and a human body, just in a slightly more open and abstract way.
The whole icon has a sense of outwards and upwards… things are moving forwards.
The whole icon is more inclusive, and shows inclusion visually too… ie the person goes into and comes out of the circle. Helpful when used to signify that facilities are designed around the person.

Facilities are designed around the person, and the symbol is designed with the person, not the wheelchair, being central which is more appropriate.

Unfortunately the process for getting the International Access Symbol changed is probably near impossible, as there are so many bodies and countries and boards which it would need to go through.  However, this hasn’t stopped me creating this. It’s making it’s debut into the world in the perfect place.

I designed my inclusive international access symbol in February this year.  I later used it to create another different design with a specific emphasis on mental health; “State of the Art”.  State of the Art is an emblem with specific personal links to my own psychological and emotional trauma recovery, while “What Does this Symbol Say?” is a symbol design which relates to my experiences of physical disability, though of course the two are related!

I’m looking forward to the private view!  Info here  (from Shape website):

 

Join us for the Private View of the 2019 Shape Open on Thursday 5th September from 6.30 – 8.30pm.

This event will be BSL interpreted.

The exhibition will be available at Nunnery Gallery until 19th September.

The Shape Open 2019 exhibition explores the theme ‘In Circles’ in the context of disability. Disabled and non-disabled artists were invited to submit work for Shape Arts’ seventh annual Open exhibition that ignites debate and discussion on disability from a wide range of viewpoints.

This year’s exhibition theme ‘In Circles’ questions whether progress for disabled artists is being and can be made within the arts, if our work is counterproductive and a circular argument, or if we can shift institutional thinking.

The exhibition showcases work across a wide range of art forms from artists around the world.

The 2019 Shape Open exhibiting artists are:

Tony Allen, Richard Amm, Faith Bebbington, Coreen Bernard, Lizz Brady, Claire Callow, Sam Castell-Ward, Annie Ho Cooper, Daisy Cowley, Nikki Davidson-Bowman, Catriona Faulkner, Alice Rose Floyd, Steven Fraser, CL Gamble, Laura Graham, Michael Gurhy, Steven Hardy, Jack Haslam, Liam Hassan-Beserekumo, Tzipporah Johnston, Elora Kadir, Nihan Karim, Glynis Lamond, Carrie Mason, Campbell Mcconnell, Andrew McPhail, Jenny Meehan, Charlie J. Meyers, Bella Milroy, Aidan Moesby, Steve Musk, Elfrida Osbert, Alice Partington, Beau Rouse, Amna Sharif, Anne Smith, Mark Tamer, Andrea Vicentini, Aminder Virdee, Ophir Yaron, and Chan Chung Yuen.

A winning artist, selected by a small panel including Shape Open Patron, Yinka Shonibare MBE (RA), will be awarded £1,000 at the Private View; a second artist will receive the People’s Choice Award of £250, as voted for by visitors of the exhibition throughout its duration. The People’s Choice Award is kindly supported by Crucial Colour Ltd, part of L&S Printing Co Ltd in Worthing, West Sussex.

Full details can be found here: https://www.shapearts.org.uk/Event/shape-open-2019

Travel Information
Opening hours: Tues-Sun, 10am to 5pm
Address: Nunnery Gallery, 181 Bow Road, London, E3 2SJ
Nearest station(s): Bow Road (District and Hammersmith and City lines) is a 6-minute walk away, and Bow Church (DLR) is a 3-minute walk away.
Bus: 205, 25, 425, A8, D8, 108, 276, 488 and 8 all service the surrounding area.”

 

Last, but not Least… North Pennines AONB Environmental Conservation Organization Subterraneous Exhibition at Bowlees Visitor Centre

I have my work on show at Bowlees Visitor Centre.  The location of the centre is within the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty/AONB and UNESCO Global Geopark.  It looks like a lovely area.  I cannot visit the exhibition but hopefully they will publish online a lot about it soon.

There’s an article here:

https://www.teesdalemercury.co.uk/art-and-leisure/exhibition-celebrates-dales-secret-world-of-bugs

I am very pleased to have my art work in this art exhibition!

My “Ant Parade” surface pattern design is something I was very pleased with and I like my work to be seen and enjoyed by others as much as possible.

Text from the above:

 

“More than 50 creations are on display in the Subterraneous exhibition at Bowlees Visitor Centre which continues to September 29 as part of the North Pennines AONB Partnership’s Cold-blooded and Spineless project.

Funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, the project raises awareness of invertebrates and highlights their importance to our environment and our lives.

Subterraneous will uncover the world of invertebrates, largely hidden from view.

The work has involved artists from the North Pennines and further afield.

Furry creatures will invade the exhibition space at Bowlees Visitor Centre and a variety of sculptures, sound and images will emphasise the importance of invertebrate conservation.

Works include ancient fossils in sandstone, vibrant insects made from recycled silk ties and even a sculpture that functions as a soil ecosystem.

There will also be an “infestation chair”, covered in a screen-printed design, celebrating the beauty and complexity of insect life.”

 

I like the sound of that chair!

 

North Pennines AONB, Environmental Conservation Organization, Subterraneous Exhibition at Bowlees Visitor Centreant parade by jenny meehan , surface pattern design, bugs, insects, ants,

ant parade by jenny meehan ©jenny meehan North Pennines AONB Environmental Conservation Organization Subterraneous Exhibition at Bowlees Visitor Centre

 

I am pleased to be supporting the North Pennines AONB Partnership’s Cold-blooded and Spineless project by exhibiting my work in the  Subterraneous exhibition.

Subterraneous is part of an AONB Partnership project.

Cold-blooded and Spineless is funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Find out more here:

  • @HeritageFundNOR

And here:

Twitter @NorthPennAONB  @northpennwild

Facebook @NorthPenninesAONB   

Instagram @northpenninesaonb

My text on Ant Parade

Ant Parade 2019

This small square piece of fabric is an example of one strand of my creative practice which involves experimentation with geometric shapes and patterns. The original form of the ants has been obscured and distorted through my visual interpretation, which I developed in order to emphasise the way ants work together.

Ants live and work together in highly organised societies called colonies. In fact, most ant colonies are so united toward the common purposes of survival, growth, and reproduction that they behave like a single organism, or a “superorganism.”

Pattern is an underlying structure that organises surfaces or structures in a consistent, regular manner. Pattern can be described as a repeating unit of shape or form, but it can also be thought of as the “skeleton” that organises the parts of a composition.

So these little invertebrates, do share a hidden, less obvious skeleton, of sorts. It’s the case in life that often the structures which hold the body together are not obvious at all, and sometimes completely invisible.

Pattern exists in nature as well as in designed objects; it is interesting to look at the parallels between art and nature, also appreciating the less obvious ones. Some formations are obvious and some are not.

An army of ants may well consist of creatures classified as invertebrate, but it’s certainly not spineless! A spinal column gives the body form and function. There’s a hidden spine in this ant parade, which I have interpreted visually in an abstract manner.

 

 

About Jenny Meehan British Contemporary Fine Artist and Designer

Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

I am a painter-poet/visual artist, contemplative/poet/writer, art educator, teacher and spiritual mentor (Progressive Christian faith centred) based in East Surrey/South West London, UK.

Support my art working by buying products of my design on Redbubble.com and also of course, original fine paintings, available direct from me!
Geometric and lyrical abstraction from London/Surrey based female British Contemporary Artist.

I’m interested in spirituality (particularly Christ centred spirituality), creativity, emotional and psychological well-being, trauma recovery, and mindfulness.

I exhibit mainly in the UK, and am a member of Kingston Artists’ Open Studios (KAOS).

I have trained both with SPIDIR and through a variety of other training bodies as a spiritual guide/mentor.
I am a trained teacher (PGCE) and hold occasional small groups in developing painting and drawing skills, as well as offering occasional individual tuition.

Contact me via the contact form on my website http://www.jamartlondon.com

If you are less interested in original fine art and paintings, but would like to have something with my imagery on it, then go to:
https://www.redbubble.com/people/JennyMeehan/portfolio

and

https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/portfolio

Where you can buy selected art and design.
For the more geometric abstract strand of my art and design:
https://www.redbubble.com/people/JennyMeehan/portfolio has more, and for lyrical abstraction painting-prints I will be putting work up on the other redbubble profile:
https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/portfolio

I gain a small royalty percentage which helps me towards the cost of materials and exhibiting my work. Every little helps.

You can contact me via the contact form on my website jamartlondon.com

Some of my original paintings are available for purchase when no longer required for exhibition, and I am happy to license images of my work via the Designers and Artists Copyright Society (DACS).

All content is © Jenny Meehan.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts of writing and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jenny Meehan with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Images may not be used without permission.

Please note that all images of my artwork are subject to copyright law: All rights reserved. In the first instance, contact me, and I will refer, as/if appropriate.

If you are looking for artwork, particularly abstract, colourist, expressionistic lyrical abstraction type painting images suitable for book covers etc, then do contact me as I might have something to suit which will be quick and easy to license via DACS

www.jamartlondon.com

 

https://www.instagram.com/jamartlondon_jennymeehan/

 

 

 

hotstuff golden haze jenny meehan lyrical abstraction affordable print, jamartlondon, lyrical abstraction british, contemporary lyrical abstraction,female painter

Hot Stuff/Golden Haze by Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

Hot Stuff!  Golden Haze… Two names for this.   It’s one of my  “painting to print”  series…  Need a bit of warming up at the moment. My hot water bottle is a great friend!  Sorry if the phrase “hot stuff” sounded a bit more exciting than it is!  Lol!

I have had a cold for such a long time, and I have so much mucus never-endingly streaming from my nose, that I think I may be turning into a snail.  If I were a snail I could move very fast indeed, for my amply supply of mucus would have me whizzing around for certain.  At present I am unable to whizz around, so writing must do.

I’ve put this artwork on Redbubble.com, so you can buy it safely, quickly, conveniently!

 

https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/works/35893135-hot-stuff-one-digital-collage-painting-=uprint-by-jenny-meehan?asc

I have one version of it signed by me, and this will be for sale at this years “Kingston Artists’ Open Studios”.

Kingston upon Thames in Surrey has a lovely hub of artists and each year we show our work, dotted around different venues in Kingston Upon Thames.

Open Studios in Kingston is a collaborative public exhibition whereby local artists and makers open their own homes or studios to the public and exhibit their work.

The Open Studio venues are organised into art trails in and around Kingston, featuring a wide range of 2D and 3D work – painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, glass, photography, digital art, textiles, paper art and mixed media.

This is a perfect opportunity to meet local creators, see their work, talk to them about their techniques and inspirations and buy affordable art direct from the artist.

2019 Open Studios in Kingston will be taking place on 8/9th and 15/16th June
from 11am to 5pm each day.

If you would like up to date information when it comes out, contact me via my website information form and I will send it to you asap! 

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742

I plan to display a selection of recent work, both original paintings and prints, and a couple of examples of mosaics I have been working on as well, (though they won’t be for sale).  Working with mosaic is adding some interesting perspectives on my painting, which is much appreciated!  The work I have on offer will mostly be available to buy I should think.  The price range of my original work is £80 to £600.  Most of my original fine art sells for around the £200/£300 mark, making it an affordable buy for any art collector.  I also offer a selection of prints for purchase for under £100.

Visual Art and Poetry Linkage!

One of the aspects of my creative work I am enjoying at the moment is the linkage between my visual art work and my poetry and writing.   The space between the two… between the visual art work and the words I write, is another space, and while it’s fun playing with space visually and also poetically when writing, there is yet another space created between a visual art work and something that the artist writes about it.

I’m pretty possessive about this space, and I guess I can be, at the point I am with my visual art working.  I have contacted people in the past who have used my visual art without permission or payment on their own blogs, and written their own poems about it.  I ask that they remove my artwork from their blog.  Generally they simply just don’t realise that they need to seek permission.  If my visual art practice was not so intimately connected with my own writing, I would maybe be flattered, but as an important part of my own practice, the painting-poetry combination and the integrity of it is something I feel protectively about.  It’s part of what I offer to the world, and my painting and digital work is, with increasing frequency, presented for exhibition and display, very purposefully paired with my own writing.  Indeed I would go as far to say as the visual work and the writing become one art work.

This happens over time.  What tends to happen is I create the visual work… this is one strand. Then, it needs to wait, normally for some time.  This is counter cultural, for in our culture waiting is not generally valued very much at all.  We are all now now now or never.  But I have an ongoing relationship with the paintings and digital imagery I produce, and it continues for several years after I deem the art work visually completed.  Because the visual completion is only one part of the process.  After this time, I need to dwell with the work for a while.  And though I have had a strong sense that the work has achieved something, in terms of emotional expression and I have felt satisfied with it’s state of being, what it means for me is only discovered over time.  And so I will revisit it, and reflect, it will remind me of certain things and I will relate to it over time.  It is maybe like a kind of proving process?  It’s symbolic and metaphorical nature,  still always retaining a sense of the unknown, and subconscious resonance (which is very attractive I think, and shouldn’t ever need to be explicit!).

But like all things in life, there is also the application. And I do like my work to be useful, used, out there. (with permission!) It may be mine for a while, but believe me, I am always pleased to see it go elsewhere, and I don’t hold onto it.  Part of the process is my thinking and critical evaluation of it.  My thoughts, research, interests, and the decisions I make as to how I am going to use it.  I’m delighted when it is used in book cover designs, because these are always very carefully thought about and the relationship between the content of the book and the image on the cover is very exciting, especially when I get to read the book! So there is a relationship between word and image there, and it’s a topic I find of great interest and have done for a while. But in relation to establishing a relationship between my own visual artwork and the words I choose to write, it is when I spot a subject of interest that there becomes an invitation to almost recreate the work.  For it is a recreation and a new artwork, when married to words I write about it.  This is the reason much of my work has two titles.  The first title is generally the first one, when the work stood alone, and then in time, with thought, and often writing, the work develops into something else and has an additional title added to it.  By writing and re-responding to the visual art work, in my view, I recreate the work.

So once my visual art work; be it digital or painting, or sculpture, whatever; once it has it’s poem/writing attached, It’s become something else… More focused, more specific, more applied.  It’s met me in my life, come to be, and then I want it to have a life which has relevance not only for me in that personal way, but has taken on some useful role, which touches shared points of interest, not just emotionally (though this is my main interest, for sure) but which establishes relationships far beyond that which first brought it into being.  It needs some action and reaction in the world, some relevance, some other people, things, ideas, missions, purposes to have a new kind of dynamic existence.  This doesn’t mean it ever needed any justification…It is sufficient to just be, as indeed any person in the world is sufficient just to be.  The value is there, just in existence.  But to have application is always good.

I often describe myself as both a fine and applied artist.  The main thing is, that at the moment, (most of the time), I create what I do with no set purpose in mind.  It’s my working method.  It’s the way that I have totally free reign. It allows me to work on several things at once, in a piecemeal fashion, and with no concern for the end outcome at all.  This is why I like it.  I do enjoy working to specific briefs and for particular purposes; these present their own challenges and that in itself is interesting and enjoyable; but so many of my ideas come from this kind of total free flow possible with a less structured approach.  Being less structured doesn’t mean less disciplined.  Far from it.  The structure has to come from within, and this requires a certain stamina.  I love life invested into the realm of creativity, but it certainly is hard work. However, it couldn’t be any other way.  And there’s a great peace which comes from doing what you care about in life. It’s well worth the effort, whatever comes or doesn’t come of it.  In a sense, my main concern is to maintain my own integrity, and develop, both personally and professionally.

Artistic activity needs to be flexible, and I enjoy the way my own weaves into my other activities and roles in life.  I have been thinking recently I need to invest more time into writing, and I am looking into copy writing, proof reading and editing as activities I might develop more experience in. I have two ebooks of my own I would like to work on as well.  I had a dreadful habit of trying to do everything at once, but I guess the good thing is that I can catch myself trying to do the impossible and pull myself back!

 

 

"opening the way"painting©jenny meehan, abstract impressionist lyrical original fine art to buy, licensable non representational images, christian abstract expressionist artist, spirituality religion, faith, contemplation, mindfulness, contemporary abstract icons, jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings,art informel gestural, uk fine artist poet-painter

jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings “Opening the Way”

 

Opening the Way – Lyrical Abstraction -Painting by Jenny Meehan

I described my painting style as primarily lyrical abstraction to someone recently at an artists’ networking event, as it’s the most appropriate description for my painting, at least, but “lyrical abstraction” is not a term a lot of people are familiar with!  I have become quite content with the fact that my painting style might be viewed as a little dated and not current…though of course I do not agree with that perspective one little bit!  I think there are many undercurrents in the visual arts, running along merrily, and what surfaces as being “current” at one time or another is a matter of trends and fashions, not a matter of what is really developing as significant.  How can one discern the undercurrents which make a large wave?  How can you see what happens until it culminates in a bigger movement?  What determines the movement…is it due to something which happens above the surface, or underneath it?  Who knows?  The mystery is good.  And here you see, I find myself slipping very comfortably into the category of a lyrical abstractionist (maybe not a word!) painter!

Some helpful pointers and considerations, features maybe, of what would place my painting in this category of lyrical abstraction.  Lyrical abstraction is a term, and has it’s uses.  (Well, it does if people know what it means!) So hopefully my thoughts shared here will help you in your understanding of what characteristics may be dominant features of paintings defined as being “lyrical abstract” paintings.  One will need to detach some aspects and add others, because I do believe that terminology has limitations as well as benefits.  Also, what something was in one part of history, is never quite the same as what it is in other parts of history… Our times determine so much, and any artists responses are conditioned by the times they live in.  I do, as you maybe know, love looking back into the past, and I think it’s a good practice for any artist to ensure they look at those who have come before them and find out as much as they can, so that the can appreciate the work with the benefit of being able to look backwards… for from the past the future comes…

Anyway, I digress, as is of my habit…

The term “Lyrical Abstraction” is much debated. Which makes it very attractive I think!  Larry Aldrich used the term lyrical abstraction in the late sixties to describe some of the artworks he had collected. The feature he felt was important was that they represented a return to personal expression following Minimalism.

An exhibition was held at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
May 25- July 6. 1971

“Statement of the Exhibition

Early last season, it became apparent that in painting there was a movement away from the
geometric, hard-edge, and minimal, toward more lyrical, sensuous, romantic abstractions
in colors which were softer and more vibrant. Painters were creating, in significant numbers,
works that were visually “beautiful” — up to then, in the art world of the sixties, a dirty word.
Though they were not going back to any previous style, these new young painters related
to men who have been doing painting of a painterly nature for twenty years or more — Mark
Rothko, Robert Motherwell and others. The artist’s touch is always visible in this type of
painting, even when the paintings are done with spray guns, sponges or other objects.
Surfaces are never anonymous as in minimal paintings; they are delicately nuanced and
often suggestive of cloudy voids. These paintings all represent a distinct shift to an ex-
pressive interest. As I researched this lyrical trend, I found many young artists whose paint-
ings appealed to me so much that I was impelled to acquire many of them. The majority
of the paintings in the Lyrical Abstraction exhibition were created in 1969, and all are a
part of my collection now.

Larry Aldrich

April 1970″

 

Take a look at the artists shown here:

https://archive.org/stream/lyabstracti00whit/lyabstracti00whit_djvu.txt

 

A slightly more recent example here: http://palmbeachartspaper.com/art-review-lyrical-abstraction-show-demonstrates-resilience-of-american-painting/

A variation of the term was used decades earlier in the late forties by the French art critic Jean José Marchand;  Abstraction Lyrique. This was with reference to a European trend in painting a bit like  Abstract Expressionism.  Free, emotionally inspired and very personal compositions based not on external appearances but evolving rather from the subconscious, instinctive parts of the painters. The evolution and  construction of the painting  coming from within. I guess we could go even further back, too to Wassily Kandinsky in the first decade of the twentieth century!  Rather than working with images from the external world and altering them in order to express abstract ideas, in the way that happened with Suprematist and Constructivist artists using recognizable forms in their art but in ambiguous, symbolic ways, another group of artists approached abstraction in a different way. Not knowing what meaning there might be in what they painted was just fine!  Painting freely, with no preconceived notions and the expectation that things unknown could be expressed through their work. Some likened their paintings to musical compositions.(ie Kandinsky) The general emphasis was that of expression emotion in an abstract form. Paintings were imaginative, expressive and personal. Unashamedly subjective, and poetic.  Soulful work…not so much leaning towards objective academic interpretations but learning more towards the mysterious, spiritual, and less tangible aspects of life.  Painting as a source of seeking maybe…not attempting something which is defined and explained, but rather being all about personal connection with life and the universe.

Rather good! A search for what is essentially personal.

Harold Rosenberg wrote: “Today, each artist must undertake to invent himself…The meaning of art in our time flows from this function of self-creation.”

That was then, but surely this is also relevant for today? Maybe even more so…because the challenge of the self and the sufficiency of simply being, is with us, and maybe even greater with the influence of media, advertising, internet, etc?

Is “being” enough?  This may be one of the most important questions we ask ourselves!

We have so much information and knowledge for the intellect to play with at our disposal now!  It’s great, fun, interesting. Yes, all of this.  But is knowing things with our heads sometimes a deceptive liberty?  Does it prevent us from walking freely in mystery, unknowing, and that which we cannot hold onto in our heads, but which our hearts and souls might testify is good and life giving?

I do ask myself these questions.

I think my work could be said to ask them, but does it need an answer?  And if it doesn’t ask for an answer, is it a question?

!!!

“Each artist must undertake to invent himself.”  Is sticking with me in this digression…

But what with lyrical abstraction today? Movements move and change… tendencies run this way and that…Who knows? No one has the ultimate view. In the early twentieth Century artists like Kandinsky, Giacometti, Fautrier, Klee and Wols embodied lyrical tendencies in abstraction. Later Mathieu, Riopelle, Soulages and Mitchell moved them forward. When I was growing up in the 60’s and 70’s many artists continued and expanded the movement.  There are many voices singing out  lyrically in abstract paintings!  There is an essential quest of lyrical abstraction, which is to express something personal, subjective and emotive, and to do this in a highly poetic, free and abstract manner.

I think this section of Ronnie Landfield’s “Autobiographical Statement, 1997-2010” speaks with a resonance which I am happy to echo, (in my own unique way, of course!)

My inspiration has been my conviction that modern painting is fueled by the combination of tradition and the realities of modern life. Spirituality and feeling are the basic subjects of my work. They are depictions of intuitive expressions using color as language, and the landscape (God’s earth) as a metaphor for the arena of life. The revelation of a primal image that delivers an immediate response in the viewer is my goal. Hopefully my paintings convey a felt perception of life, an awareness of the history of art, and a clear expression of my passion and sense of spirituality. I sense a visual music that externalizes what I feel within me and in the air.”

What a fantastic statement…

The revelation of a primal image that delivers an immediate response in the viewer is my goal.

Well, all writing aside, this is most certainly enough, more than enough, and will ever be enough!

Paint on!

Words are words, and paint is paint!

See more of Ronnie Landfield here: http://ronnielandfield.com/

Some contemporary painters which you might like to view…

the Spanish artist Laurent Jiménez-Balaguer

Margaret Neil

Ellen Priest

 

 

‘Un’antenna sensibile’

Rather nice quote, for my notes!

Quote by Christopher Adams: Claudio Del Sole: ‘Un’antenna sensibile’
Christopher Adams

“Del Sole saw no contradiction between his predilection for abstraction and his observation of natural phenomena, finding inspiration in the swirling patterns of galaxies and nebulae. Nor did he recognise any distinctions between art and life, asserting: “The artist is not enclosed in a restricted or exclusive world of his own. He is like an antenna, sensitive to all that which happens around him. Therefore, he is attentive to social changes and the progress of science; that is, to the unfolding story of mankind.”

Yes!  Like an antenna!  I like this very much!  And attentive!  So true!

We take in all that surrounds us, ingest it… and then do what we do with it!  There is some kind of narrative in every person, expressed through words and images.  When I work with abstract forms visually, there is no disconnect from the outer world, even though I don’t work with pictures (ie recognisable objects). I approach the matter and materials in the same way that I approach nature, life and all I see in the natural world, even though I don’t seek to emulate it.  I am not attempting to create something more distant or disconnected “more spiritual” or “set apart” from the world in any way. It’s rather an engagement, a translation maybe a good word, an interpretation of my being and living based on emotion and experience.

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

I take less photographs now than I did, but sometimes you see something you cannot resist!  Looking at the sky reminds me of why I don’t lean towards representational painting myself, though I do enjoy looking at others work.  I find the work is always before me, far surpassing any emulation I might make of it.   I do enjoy a bit of drawing… It’s always good to do from time to time… Mostly because of the mark making though.

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

Broken branches in Oxshott Woods.  Oxshott Woods has a special resonance for me because as a child we went for a walk there every Sunday.  I like this image of mine because it conveys brokenness but also a real invitation to move forwards into the image. I remember the exposed roots of so many of the trees in Oxshott woods and how entrancing they were…

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

Another Oxshott Woods/Oxshott Common image.  This was taken on the edge of the big “sand pit” area.  It’s fun to think I am walking the very same ground I did when we went for walks there when I was a child.  It’s amazing how things change, and quite a relief to be honest.  I’ve probably written it elsewhere, but I had a really difficult childhood, in so many ways, and I’m now enjoying life more than ever before; so much happier and so much more alive!  It’s good I have come a long way, and though it’s easy to feel I wish things had been easier, in the end, the past makes us what we are, and we cannot live without it, but we can move on.

Things I have been reading recently:

Good read on trauma and how it affects ones sense of time:

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4166378/

Lots in there to read and think over, so popping in my journal for now. I’ve skim read parts.

 

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2167702613495199

 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/experimentations/201711/six-elements-self-care-in-adults-childhood-trauma

 

Rear Access Roads and Alleyways

 

rear access road chessington drawing 2 jenny meehan

rear access road chessington drawing 2 jenny meehan

rear access roads chessington drawing jenny meehan

rear access roads chessington drawing jenny meehan

jenny meehan landscape black and white photographic images,jamartlondon photography

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

 

I’ve popped these in because I have realised recently how important the “Alleyway” was to me as a child. We lived in Teddington, not Chessington, and the alleyway of my childhood was narrow, and quite different to the rear access roads I have drawn here.  However, emotionally there is a strong connection I had previously overlooked.  My brother and myself would play in the alley…exploring around the backs of peoples gardens…peeking through holes in fences and sometimes creeping into places we were not meant to be!  It was all very exciting and interesting.  The drawings of the rear access roads in Hook and Chessington were drawn by me in what I like to call my “wilderness” phase.  It was before I really got into painting as my main focus, and yet grew highly aware that painting was the right direction for me to go into creatively, in a big way.

Emotionally it was a tough time, and I struggled psychologically also; I felt very lost indeed, in terms of having a sense of self.  I find it interesting that, at this time, I found the rear access roads so comforting, and so safe, and all at the very time in my life when fear grew increasingly severe.  It provided an area and space to feel I existed in.  I think the lack of facades was helpful, also, for I was aware my own had slipped somewhat!  It was a raw, bare, place, of exposure and of no longer being able to pretend I was “all right”.  Somehow embracing the “shadow side” had to happen.

I was not familiar with the term “shadow side” at that point in my life, however I do remember being fascinated with the dark, square areas I came across, which I think you can see comes across in the drawings. For me, I saw these as being a void…a place which represented how I increasingly felt inside.  Inner emptiness.  At times (the worst) where I would rather be: in nothingness.  A lot of the areas of interest for me in my frequent walks involved an appreciation of decay, decomposition, and neglect, with some attention to unexpected growth, and finding unexpected treasures.  Even in the worst of life’s passages, if looking outwards, beauty can be found with some effort, and I did find it, even though I couldn’t see any inside myself at that point.  Carl Jung stated “the shadow” to be the unknown dark side of the personality, which was instinctive and irrational. There was also a sense of this in what the dark, blank areas communicated to me.  Like some kind of mirror, they reminded me of how instinctive and irrational I was at my core, and I was certainly more aware of that than I had ever been aware of before in my life!

Quote from: https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/evil-deeds/201204/essential-secrets-psychotherapy-what-is-the-shadow

“For Jung, the theory of the‘‘shadow’’ was a metaphorical means of conveying the prominent role played by the unconscious in both psychopathology and the perennial problem of evil. In developing his paradoxical conception of the shadow, Jung sought to provide a more highly differentiated, phenomenologically descriptive version of the unconscious and of the id than previously proffered by Freud. The shadow was originally Jung’s poetic term for the totality of the unconscious, a notion he took from philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. But foremost for Jung was the task of further illuminating the shadowy problem of human evil and the prodigious dangers of excessive unconsciousness.”

 Quote from Stephen A. Diamond, Ph.D., 

 

Well, as per usual I have written myself out of words, and need to stop for now. I do prefer this longer narrative to that which I would achieve by posting short posts on instagram, or making shorter blog entries.  Writing longer means I can go a little deeper, and that is more benefit to me as an artist than just posting up things which haven’t required me to probe a bit deeper into my own mind and emotions.  Skim reading may save anyone from unwanted reading matter, I know, and this also gives me some freedom.  I spend a lot of time skim reading, and also skim thinking, (sometimes more than I want), so the knowledge a reader can slip across unwanted material with such ease, is something which has surely liberated me in exploring writing about my art working in this manner.  A matter which caught my interest and caused me find this interesting read; 

 

https://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman/skim-reading-from-screens-is-doing-scary-thing-to-your-brain-according-to-neuroscience.html

 

 

My original artwork has two main strands: Lyrical Abstraction, painterly, fluid, with a lot of focus on light, how it bounces off the surface, textures and finishes, and Geometric Abstraction (created through digital imaging software) in which I focus on flat areas of smooth, solid, and translucent colour; ideally intended to be printed on even, matt or semi-mat surfaces.

While I’m experimenting with the overlap between the two, and make it my practice to regularly try out new mediums, in order to keep my artwork fresh and steadily evolving, identifying the strands in this way is helpful for clarity.  I use writing and poetry in my art working and now prefer to use sol-silica paint over acrylics or oils, though I am still known to dabble in many different types of paint, due to their particular material and visual qualities!

If you would like to give money to help support my creative practice, I can accept it quickly and easily through the Paypal.me process. Simply put the following in your browser:
paypal.me/jennymeehan
and follow the prompts. Please consider supporting my work in this way if it strikes a chord with you and you are able to do so. I do need support in order to continue my artworking.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742 direct link to contact page of website

Signing up as a follower on my WordPress blog ( https://jennymeehan.wordpress.com) also helps, as does sharing the posts when you receive them.  Anything you can do to help me is much appreciated!

My artwork is particularly suitable for themes of: faith, religion, philosophy, Christian, church, all faith traditions, inter-faith, spirituality, the subconscious, psychoanalytic themes, mindfulness, contemplative practices, healing, health, both physical and mental, trauma recovery, metaphysical and psychological focused writings, the devotional life, and many other subjects.

All my images are licensable and this is arranged through the Designer and Artists’ Copyright Socitety (DACS). If you wish to use my artwork, please contact me in the first instance.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742 direct link to contact page of website

Alongside my mainly lyrical abstract paintings, there is another important strand in my work which includes more of a narrative.  Well, some kind of narrative. Through my writing, and my participation in ongoing psychotherapy, I draw on my subconscious.  It’s this process of self reflection, examination, and other contemplative practices which are rooted in my own faith tradition as a Christian, alongside a good dose of yoga and West African drumming, which have created an exciting way ahead for my work with visual art.  I think it’s the relationship between my writing and visual work, particularly through poetry, which helps determine the direction in my art practice.

I’m a member of Kingston Artists’ Open Studios: http://www.kingstonartistsopenstudios.co.uk/product-category/artists-m-to-z/

Great Start to a New Year! Praying the Way!

 

praying the way by terr hinks, Bible Reading Fellowship with leap of faith image by jenny meehan, religious devotional book covers, licensable images christian publishing, prayer spirituality publications UK cover design, non pictorial book cover design, geometric abstract book covers,

“praying the way” by terry hinks book published by Bible Reading Fellowship with “leap of faith” image by jenny meehan

 

What a delight to see this amazing book cover design for the also very amazing and inspiration book of “raw and authentic prayers” by Terry Hinks. Terry Hinks is a United Reformed Church minister and the author of a number of books on prayer.

The cover design and inside pages are the work of designer Alison Beek, Designer, for the Bible Reading Fellowship,  who licensed my image “Leap of Faith” through DACS for the cover design of the book.

It is the best thing in the world to see my artwork used for such purposes as this, as close to my heart and faith!

I now have my copy, and am already being blessed!  It’s a super book, deep and insightful, challenging and touching.  I love the idea of starting this year “Praying the Way”.  It is through all the small leaps of faith we make that we move forwards, and it seems to me that the path appears the moment we make a brave jump into the air!  Many things change as we mature in our faith; previous beliefs however dear are challenged, and life seems to be a matter of constantly realising how little we know, and how much we need to hand ourselves over to the one who created us and loves us so dearly. While certainties fall away, still the potential to trust ourselves into the hands of the Creator exists, and the path of committing ourselves to Christ (if that’s our faith tradition) and continual desire for repentance, enlightenment, and growth in compassion, can move with strength forwards into the years to come.  Well, that’s my prayer for this year I think.

 

 

 

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved leap of faith (jennifer meehan) jenny meehan geometrical abstrace design artwork fine art print to buy

leap of faith jenny meehan (jennifer meehan) geometrical abstract design artwork fine art print to buy

 

“Leap of Faith” is one of my personal favourites, it’s true.

If you like it, I do have it up on Redbubble.com, which is a print on demand site.

https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/works/13790986-no-cares-take-courage-leap-of-faith-design-by-jenny-meehan

My original artwork has two main strands: Lyrical Abstraction, painterly, fluid, with a lot of focus on light, how it bounces off the surface, textures and finishes, and Geometric Abstraction (created through digital imaging software) in which I focus on flat areas of smooth, solid, and translucent colour; ideally intended to be printed on even, matt or semi-mat surfaces.  While I’m experimenting with the overlap between the two, and make it my practice to regularly try out new mediums, in order to keep my artwork fresh and steadily evolving, identifying the strands in this way is helpful for clarity.  I use writing and poetry in my art working and now prefer to use sol-silica paint over acrylics or oils, though I am still known to dabble in many different types of paint, due to their particular material and visual qualities!

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design?

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design? If so, then take a look at my website jamartlondon.com, for a start.

My artwork is particularly suitable for themes of: faith, religion, philosophy, Christian, church, all faith traditions, inter-faith, spirituality, the subconscious, psychoanalytic themes, mindfulness, contemplative practices, healing, health, both physical and mental, trauma recovery, metaphysical and psychological focused writings, the devotional life, and many other subjects.

Indeed, pretty much any subject matter or theme which benefits from a more abstract graphic image; one which also conveys basic feelings and ideas in an open and experimental manner; would benefit from it’s clarity of communication being enhanced by one of my art images.

From the lyrical abstraction of some of abstract expressionist style textured paintings, to the geometric abstraction clear edged imagery, which I also produce, the value of non representational imagery in book cover design which is both colourful and interesting, and stimulates the eye with colour and striking composition, cannot be under estimated.

If you are looking for something particular, do contact me, because I only display a small amount on the internet and may even be able to create something specific to your needs, or be able to locate something from my extensive archives which meets your need.

DACS administrate my licensing agreements and organise the use of my art work images quickly and conveniently. They are very helpful and can guide you through the process if you are unfamiliar with it. I normally follow their guidelines with respect to the fees for licensing, as these are set in line with the industry standard.

DACS do offer a good reduction in fees for registered charities. Occasionally it may be possible for slightly reduced rates to be negotiated in other circumstances.

To find out more about how you can arrange to use my imagery, see here:

https://www.dacs.org.uk/licensing-works/frequently-asked-questions#FAQ122

 

January and February 2019

Well, it’s one post every two months from now on.  My art working has a certain amount of momentum to it at the moment, and I am keen to keep the focus on ongoing art working… however, I do love writing this journal… It’s very useful to me and serves as a small amount of space for contemplation.  Reflection, and anticipation.   It’s very interesting as a tool.   I enjoy looking backwards at earlier posts and hearing my voice at that time often proves helpful in informing the present.

It frequently amuses me how some people, on understanding the contemplative nature of my work, assume I have hours to spare.  The funny thing is, for all of us, is that it is very easy to imagine that other people have more time than us.  We all do it.  I do too.  I often remind myself of my own judgements of others,  and  find some comfort in the fact that our assumptions about others, when properly examined, often can reveal interesting feelings and beliefs we ourselves hold.

The reality is that it is a constant battle to push my art working forwards.  It’s a bit easier than it was when the children were younger, but I still have a house of people which needs management, and those who manage a household know that this is something of an invisible role.  Things just happen by magic, I believe.  It’s unpaid and unappreciated work.  But where would we all be without it?  If the house is a bit of a mess now, (which it pretty much always is!) then without my labour invested into it, things would be unworkable.

While I don’t mind my work being based in the household (and this has advantages in terms of productivity generally), it is yet another factor which might suggest to some folk that I do not work.  I completely get the reality that art working is not a job, in the usually understood sense. It’s a role, but being an artist is not a job. Not if jobs are defined by their capacity to generate income, anyway.

It’s a funny old thing, because there are huge numbers of artists involved in art working, and the vast majority of us earn less than a few thousand pounds a year from our creative activities.  Most people don’t realise this at all.  Income for artists comes from other people, other activities and roles, and we really need the support of people investing in us and our work. I really need the support of people investing in my work…buying it, sharing it, valuing it.  It is my contribution to the world, pure and simple.  Not the only one, but the one I care about with a passion and the one I believe I am meant to be pursuing.

Which is why I do it.

Yet cultural richness… The richness of contemplative experiences, dwelling in the moment, inner examination, reflection…individual and shared.

Cultural richness… The world of the imagination, the spirit, the journey we all make through life, which can be enhanced, enlightened, and inspired by the arts of all varieties…

Cultural richness…  Of a worth which is often not appreciated as much as it might be…We take it for granted a lot of the time.

So many ways of life shared by so many people. And artistic expression of experience is fundamentally important in communication and understanding. Cultural richness is something which includes diversity in anything that has to do with how people live: music, art, recreation, religion or beliefs, languages, dress, traditions and stories.  It also encompasses things like how we organise ourselves and how we interact with the environment, and even the  attitudes we hold towards others.

So if you like my art working, and think it brings something valuable to the world in it’s relatively small way, then do consider supporting me.  You can do this buy buying my work (very pleasing, as it releases more room for more work!) licensing my art images through DACS, the Design and Artists Copyright Society, buying merchandise with my designs and art on it, which you can do through Redbubble.com (I get a small percentage of the price you pay…Every little helps.   You can follow, share and help promote as you are able, if so inclined.

Contact page on my website:  http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742

I have a lot more art work than I am able to show on the internet.  The reason being that my time for marketing and promoting, and putting things onto the internet is very restricted… I cannot keep up with my own creativity.  I keep my own archives and that is something in itself!  So if you are looking for something specific, then it’s always worth contacting me, which you can do through the contact page of my website.  I can produce artworks in a large variety of scales and formats, on different materials and through different techniques.  It’s often quite interesting for me to have a focused project to meet precise specifications.

If you just simply wish to support me financially, that’s really helpful too.  How?  Just here!

https://www.paypal.me/jennymeehan

Safe, quick and easy!

There isn’t a way of me thanking you through this method though, so if you do choose to support me through this system, please send me and email and let me know it was you, so I can express my gratitude.  I don’t like asking for financial support, but I have realised I cannot afford not to, and I don’t mind losing a little bit of pride…I have too much anyway!

A lot of people don’t realise that artists, more often than not, have to pay to show their work in exhibitions, and that putting on your own exhibitions costs a great deal of money and time.  I am frequently surprised how the general public don’t realise about artists paying to enter their work in exhibitions, in addition to paying commission.  However, I don’t think I should be surprised, because it is not something shouted about.  It’s one of those mainly hidden matters, which makes it harder for artists to share their work.  And sharing our work is something we love to do.  However, paying to share it is probably one of the biggest hindrances to a much richer artistic experience for all.

I am always totally grateful that I can even invest my time into doing what I love.  I could not do this for many years, due to social and economic reasons, but now I can, I never take it for granted.  I am fortunate to do what I love. What is my calling in life.  Amazing.  It’s less fortunate I don’t get more money for doing it, but it’s well worth the sacrifices made.  This investment of time does cost though…It costs me and those around me in many respects, for I certainly could choose to invest myself and my time into more profitable activities.  Sometimes good things come my way, and its’ a great boost.  To have some finance to enable me to continue what I do is my main objective.  Circumstances may change… It’s workable now, thankfully.  I would like to show more, do more, submit more work, and push outwards far more than I am equipped to do at the present time.

It’s HARD work, this artist matter.  I wonder why I do it from time to time, but the truth is, I cannot not be who I am, and this, it seems, along with being a mother, is my role.  I am also a qualified teacher, which is handy, especially for mentoring and art tuition, and a qualified dental nurse (earlier career!) which is also handy, because we all have teeth, and it’s useful to know a fair bit about them.  (I still find it interesting!) My interest in health, both physical and psychological, and spirituality, have proved perfect partners for my art practice which is informed by my own experiences, never ending research (I love research!) and the beauty of nature. I have to laugh sometimes: mothering and caring, the unpaid domestic work carried out, AND being an artist! It’s kind of counter-cultural, in terms of value, at the moment!

Recent Work

 

Well, in these darker Winter days, I have finally gotten around to more computer based work, and this includes posting up some of my recent paintings on my website jamartlondon.com.

This new series has quite a light, refreshing feel to it.

breath one, ©jenny meehan ©jenny meehan, abstract impressionist lyrical original fine art to buy, licensable non representational images, christian abstract expressionist artist, spirituality religion, faith, contemplation, mindfulness, icon, jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings

jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings©jenny meehan title breath one

 

©jenny meehan, abstract impressionist lyrical original fine art to buy, licensable non representational images, christian abstract expressionist artist, spirituality religion, faith, contemplation, mindfulness, contemporary abstract icons, jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings,art informel gestural, uk fine artist poet-painter

jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings title painting breath two

 

©jenny meehan, abstract impressionist lyrical original fine art to buy, licensable non representational images, christian abstract expressionist artist, spirituality religion, faith, contemplation, mindfulness, contemporary abstract icons, jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings,art informel gestural, uk fine artist poet-painter

jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings title Light Touch

 

"onwards and upwards" ©jenny meehan, abstract impressionist lyrical original fine art to buy, licensable non representational images, christian abstract expressionist artist, spirituality religion, faith, contemplation, mindfulness, contemporary abstract icons, jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings,art informel gestural, uk fine artist poet-painter

jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings

 

 

"opening the way"painting©jenny meehan, abstract impressionist lyrical original fine art to buy, licensable non representational images, christian abstract expressionist artist, spirituality religion, faith, contemplation, mindfulness, contemporary abstract icons, jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings,art informel gestural, uk fine artist poet-painter

jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings “Opening the Way”

 

"release" painting ©jenny meehan, abstract impressionist lyrical original fine art to buy, licensable non representational images, christian abstract expressionist artist, spirituality religion, faith, contemplation, mindfulness, contemporary abstract icons, jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings,art informel gestural, uk fine artist poet-painter

“Release” painting jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract paintings

 

 

 

 

Gallery Visits

This time of year… Right from October and into the New Year, is a good time to be out and about looking at Exhibitions.  I have visited several, but only highlight one here…Telfer Stokes, at the Redfern Gallery.

I really enjoyed the Telfer Stokes exhibition at the Redfern Gallery… Reminiscence: New York Paintings and Metal Objects… It ran from 21st November to 4th December. The Redfern Gallery is one of my favourite galleries to visit…They seem to show work which I find particularly interesting. I did prefer the metal objects to the paintings.

If you follow this link you get to the relevant page on The Redfern Gallery website. There is an online publication you can access there also.

My favourites: Flare, 2017,Welded steel

76 x 79 x 15 cm

https://www.redfern-gallery.com/exhibitions/43/works/image_standalone631/

Also, very keen on…

Linch Pin, 2014, Welded steel

55 x 107 x 3 cm

https://www.redfern-gallery.com/exhibitions/43/works/image_standalone634/

and last but certainly not least…

Crux, 2014, Welded steel

65 x 60 x 60 cm

https://www.redfern-gallery.com/exhibitions/43/works/image_standalone638/

 

 

A little bit of reflecting…

Seeing Matisse’s “Snail” aged 9, I said that I wanted to be an artist so “I could do that”. The desire never left, symbolised in my keeping an easel despite countless moves, which I still own now. Since 2005, when I flung myself back into the early impulse to visually create, the desire developed, and I’ve done things artistically in my current situation which weren’t possible earlier in life, due to adverse life circumstances. I love all aspects of my work, and value it deeply,  not only that of my current profession as an artist, mentor and teacher, (and mother/household manager!) but past roles as a primary school teacher, dental nurse,  and various administrative and caring roles. All these roles and experiences make me who I am, and inform the directions I put my effort into, and my interests and topics of research.

Sometimes past roles can be unexpectedly useful…I was rather amused to find my past skills as a dental nurse useful when seeking to extend my knowledge of materials and techniques by experimenting with mosaic, which is something I did recently through two excellent courses led by Vanessa Benson, both at West Dean College and the City Lit, in London.  Some little pieces of glass mosaic are amazingly like little teeth, and having a knowledge of various dental tools and equipment available is also proving useful, as I continue to tinker with the medium! (I’m using syringes a lot at the moment!!!)

My interest in materials, their composition, and uses, from a more scientific angle, was something nurtured through this past career choice, and I discovered, far more recently, how interested I am in the scientific and technical aspects of materials when I started to research the use of silicate and sol-silicate paint.  I’ve always been interested in materials to a certain degree, but when I starting using the sol-silicate paint, and experimented with various other similar more ecologically friendly paints, the interest grew.  Before I carried out the mineral paint mural at Trafalgar Junior School a few years back, I needed to do a lot of technical research which I found completely absorbing and interesting.

So it’s amazing how little bits of your past seep into the present, so unconsciously and without deliberation, very often. Knowing your materials well means you know their limitations, and you know which technical considerations are relevant to the particular purpose you employ them for.  This means that if you decide to stretch materials beyond their capacity, you can exploit what happens in an intentional and knowledgeable way.  It also means that if you have particular specifications to meet, ie, in terms of longevity, or resilience to certain factors, you can ensure your art work meets those, and be reasonably confident that they will.

How I choose and use materials in the creation of artworks has to have a solid technical understanding behind it, and I think it’s an aspect of art creation today which in some quarters doesn’t the the amount of emphasis it needs.  I spend a huge amount of time researching all aspects of the mediums I work with so that the choices I make when working with them are informed ones.  If I want something to last, then I make sure it has all the chances it can to last.  If I want something to be temporary and transient, then I can choose to ignore certain things which I know will happen over time to the work.

Indeed, is some artworks, the changes which occur over time and a fascinating dimension of the work and completely integral to its purpose.  But if what the artist intends then fails due to a technical aspect being ignored, then this is just poor workmanship.  I have seen some horrible examples of artists ideas being badly executed because of ignorance about the materials they are using, and it always makes me feel slightly embarrassed to call myself an artist when I see it happen! There are some situations when crafts-person is a far more attractive word to use!!!!

But whatever words can be used, expressive colour and mark making; the structure of composition; the illusive space possible across the face of the a substrate; these motivate me to play with visual poetry and this I believe can work on the human soul in an essential and valuable way, enriching our experience of life. It realises for me both an outer and an inner vision. This is a liberty which I don’t take for granted, and I didn’t expect to be able to work with something I love so much. I’m also aware of the restrictions I face in terms of space and money right now. However, thankfully, though I may not be able to work on the scale I would like to, I AM able to do a lot with what I have. Generally in life, though it is important to have aspirations and always look just that little bit further than where you are, this needs to be balanced with acceptance and contentment.

 

painting after constable, interpretation of Constable sketch, oil on board jenny meehan

Experimental painting carried out in 2008 by Jenny Meehan based on a sketch by Constable.

Above is a very early painting of mine, which I am very fond of.  This was one of my experiments with oil paint. It has just the feeling I like to have, gentle, breezy, light, but not wishy washy, some motion and stillness, with a light touch. This light touch, and feeling of air and space, is something I have continued to explore in completely non pictorial, fully abstracted paintings, as you can see if you visit my website jamartlondon.com and look at my paintings for 2019.  I post new work at the beginning of the year.  This is because I have had enough time over Winter reviewing progress and identifying new directions.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/paintings-2019/4594054042

 

blue boat painting by jenny meehan inspired by ivon hitchens british painter

“Blue Boat” Oil Painting by jenny meehan (after Ivon Hitchens)

“Blue Boat” is another early painting, same year I think as the one above (off the top of my head) inspired by Ivon Hitchens who is one of my most favourite artists.  Bit bolder with the colour here.  I still have this one and don’t mind letting it go.  If you want to buy it contact me via the contact form on my personal website jamartlondon.com and I will give you more details.  It was awarded “highly commended” in the Needhams Competition…quite a few years back now.  See my list of exhibitons at jamartlondon.com

 

Sharp Gallery, Brixton

I am very pleased to be part of the exhibition at the Sharp Gallery in Brixton.   The value of creativity and the arts in healthcare of all sorts is widely recognised and projects like this are worth their weight in gold.  Here’s the work I am showing, with the partner poems and other text displayed below:

 

 art and psychotherapy, art and psychoanalysis, art and subconscious, art and dreams, flower dream print by jenny meehan

flower dream print by jenny meehan

 

laid to rest print by jenny meehan jamartlondon.com, art and dream, art and subconscious, art and trauma recovery, art and psychoanalysis, art and psychotherapy, artists who use psychotherapy, art and psychological distress, art and trauma recovery

laid to rest print by jenny meehan jamartlondon.com

 

Dreams and Dreaming

Framed digital prints and their partner poems – Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

Flower Dream

Deep within the pot of me… 

Not cracked, like Mummy.

Not hung on the wall,

slipping downwards…

A glassy look

that never met my tears.

I am sad and angry…

I won’t deny it.

For too long it was inconvenient

for me to exist in reality.

As I was saying;

Deep within the pot of me

I hoped for sunlight.

I dreamt of a day

when someone mysterious

would knock at the door, and come, 

laden with flowers…

flowers upon flowers… 

Come laden with flowers,

and colours, and petals, 

and leaves, and stalks…

To give. 

To give something

to me.

Not bleeding, or painful; like daffodils when you cut them.

(My sister was horrified).

As I was saying…

I hoped for sunlight

deep within the pot

of me.

But I could not reach out for it,

though I heard it was there…

in the garden.

In the garden of flowers,

which naked, Mummy ran through,

when all was solved

and the world was

entirely

her own. 

The birds told me…

Deep in the garden…

In the shed…

I do exist.

This is why

I cry for the flowers.

They took my sister away, because she was too angry.

But keep me here, because I am no trouble.

And who needs flowers, anyway?

As long as your pot is not broken.

As I was saying…

Not cracked, like Mummy.

But empty,

non the less.

And the flowers are so beautiful; 

A beautiful dream 

for me. 

Jenny Meehan 2017

This poem accompanies the Digital C type print “Flower Dream”.

Flower Dream” is a numbered edition print (NE#1), signed by the artist-poet Jenny Meehan. It’s printed with Epson ink on 300gsm paper. Framed print: £50

See jamartlondon.com, under “Digital Imagery” for information on what a numbered edition print is.

Laid to Rest

Sleep peaceful, daughter, sleep

Dream the pathways through your mind…

leave the troubled day behind.

Sleep peaceful, daughter, sleep

Dream many dances through the sky…

Starlight night, then stepping bright;

A morning bird’s hopeful cry

To see you deeply, freely, sleepy

dropping safely, easy, warm,

into resting places

waiting

ready for the dawn.

Ready for the dawn.

Blessings; blessings; blessings 

dreamy…

Dreamy child, of mine.

Blessings; blessings; blessings

dreamy.

Dream-child

of peaceful

mind. 

Jenny Meehan 2018

This poem accompanies the Digital C type print “Laid to Rest”.

Laid to Rest” is a numbered edition print (NE#1), signed by the artist-poet Jenny Meehan. It’s printed with Canon ink on 220gsm paper. Framed print: £50

See jamartlondon.com, under “Digital Imagery” for information on what a numbered edition print is.

About Jenny Meehan

Jenny Meehan is a Kingston Upon Thames based artist working painting, poetry and digital imagery. Following her studies at Kingston University,(BA Hons Literature) a Post Graduate Certificate in Education at Roehampton University led to a career in teaching. From 2010 Jenny focused on the Visual Arts, training at both West Dean College and local adult education provision. Selected by a wide range of judges, her work has been displayed across many galleries and museums in the UK. These include the Dulwich Picture Gallery, Pallant House Gallery, and Kingston Museum.

I’m very pleased to be part of this exhibition. I have a keen interest in mental health and recovery, partly due to the traumas experienced in my formative years, and the realisation in 2010 that I couldn’t deny the reality of their effect on me any longer. My engagement in psychotherapy has a rich and interesting relationship with my creative output which I exploit with interest. 

The subject of dreams is something close to my heart. Finding dreams and allowing them to exist is probably one of many people’s greatest achievements. As is using the darker dimension of our experiences, and seeing light permeate through even the deepest fear.

I hope you enjoy the poetic space I create in presenting both word and image together.”

The exhibition at the Sharp Gallery runs from the end of January to end of March.  Please check the venue to see viewing opportunities.  Sharp Gallery, 308, Brixton Road, SW9 6AA http://sharp-gallery.webflow.io/

Alongside my mainly lyrical abstract paintings, there is another important strand in my work which includes more of a narrative.  Well, some kind of narrative. Through my writing, and my participation in ongoing psychotherapy, I draw on my subconscious.  It’s this process of self reflection, examination, and other contemplative practices which are rooted in my own faith tradition as a Christian, alongside a good dose of yoga and West African drumming, which have created an exciting way ahead for my work with visual art.  I think it’s the relationship between my writing and visual work, particularly through poetry, which helps determine the direction in my art practice.

I think it probably does this by helping me to identify how past experiences contribute to the present interests I hold.  I think developing a clear voice is very useful when you are involved in the visual arts.  There is so much wonderful art out there, but in the end, we need to find the motivation and drive within ourselves to persist with the vocation of artist.  It isn’t easy, in our current materialistic and capitalistic focused culture.  But it is worth it.

Kader Attia’s first UK Survey Exhibition

The exhibition “questions our ideas about wholeness and injury, authenticity and repair, belonging and otherness” I read, and this, along with some interesting images drew me to take a better look than a screen permits!  Very interesting to read more about his interests and focus here

I like the look of this exhibition very much.  This time of year is good for visiting exhibitions, and  while I cannot afford to visit as many as I would ideally like, because of the costs involved, to be honest, living in this part of the country, there is so much on offer to see, big and small, that I have more than my fill of gallery going!

 

Loving Research – The Philosophical, Psychological and Metaphysical Kind! Mostly…

I love researching.  It’s  something I regularly fall into, and enjoy very much.  I don’t consciously draw lines between my researching activities and my artistic production, in the way that maybe a Scientist would with their work… There’s normally no need.  But my visual art certainly has a flickering background of thought behind it, which generally only comes into focus if I need to write an artist’s statement, or similar, about a specific piece of visual art work. I prefer to let my research happen organically, tracing it’s pathways through the thoughts, physical artistic output, and my general experiences of everyday life.  I remind myself that I am not working for a gallery, and needing to put signs up against every piece of work I produce, so that it might be articulated with the language of words.  With so much emphasis on the conceptual today, it’s tempting, maybe, to feel the need to legitimise artistic practice with words, for some.  Maybe all? And sometimes.  And while bending your intellect, this way and that, is fun…(I love it)…I don’t think it can make a piece of significant art happen, however much someone might try.  Because what is significant wells up within for a person.  Maybe where the research comes into  play is that it can be helpful for an artist in developing a reflective artistic practice.  In being able to identify what one is trying to express/do/communicate and what it means to oneself personally, and also to relate it to many other thoughts, theories, approaches, and beliefs.

This may be part of why I have chosen to write this artist’s journal…At least this is a way I can track some of my preoccupations, for the problem I have with note books, of which I have many…is they dance around the house constantly, picked up, then left, lost and then found.  It seems right to let this happen.  And it’s so interesting when old ones turn up.  But with this artist’s journal…There is the constant screen in front of me, and the only thing which changes is what I am writing. I think it may be of passing interest to someone now and again, and I think about the fact it is maybe read occasionally. However, it’s not the same as writing for some other person, because while that maybe one aspect, I allow myself repetition, deviation, and other flaws in the writing, which wouldn’t be acceptable in another form to the same extent. The pleasure in writing this artist’s journal is possibly much greater than the pleasure in reading it, but never mind.  It is what it is!  It’s somewhere to attach bits of interesting things I have found, and enables me to pick them up when I need to, and rediscover them when I don’t expect to find them again, but with the significant added benefit, that when I feel like a bit of writing, I know where to go!

My reading notes;

Something I am looking at now:  John Macquarrie on Language, Being, and God
Author(s): Eugene Thomas Long
Source: The Review of Metaphysics, Vol. 30, No. 2 (Dec., 1976), pp. 255-279
Published by: Philosophy Education Society Inc.

Need to think on this for a while… Very interested in reading more John Macquarrie.

I think I am between a realist and idealist.  Objectivity and subjectivity seem to both hold equal sway in reality! I think paradox and tension between things vital and helpful in life.  I’m interested in dipping into considering different perspectives, but all my own thinking seems clearly rooted in a firm belief of an external (as well as internal) Creator God who does exist, whatever I might think.  And I am so much a lover of the material world, (nature) which I don’t see as apart from the spiritual, but also expressing the wondrous qualities of God.  What I do get from reading (admittedly in a somewhat cursory and skimming type matter) is lots of interesting relationships between elements I don’t normally bother to think about!)

Some other reading:

 

https://www.thoughtco.com/working-with-worry-449711

https://www.tate.org.uk/context-comment/articles/does-beauty-still-matter-art

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/the-daily-princetonian/prosumerism_b_1463166.html

 

I’ve been thinking about other faith traditions and Christ, and how the tendency to shuffle into thinking one’s own faith tradition is better than someone else’s is so unpleasant and not Christ-like.  What we know of the life of the Lord Jesus Christ through the New Testament communicates that Jesus honoured and respected people of other faith traditions without doubt.

In his book “Discover the Power Within You” Eric Butterworth wrote:
“I have often speculated on what Jesus would have done if he had been seated around a table with a Buddhist, a Hindu, a Muslim and a Shintoist—discussing ultimate Truth. I just can’t believe that Jesus would have said, ‘You must all forsake your beliefs and come and follow me.’ I think he might have pointed out that the differences were chiefly a matter of semantics, and that there is an underlying principle similar to the Christ idea in every religion. I think he would have stressed the basic unity within the diversity of religions, pointing out that the greatest need of all persons is to find that indwelling unity with God, which is found in the principle of divine Sonship, that we call the Christ.”

Well, that’s some of my reading for the time being.

Publishing this Post NOW!

I’m going to publish this blog post early rather than late. I’ts got longer than I expected it to!

Now I’ve decided only to post once every two months, in order to reduce time spent on writing it, and hopefully enhance the focus of it, I’ll get it out there and forget any more blog writing for a nice big chunk of time!

 

 

©jenny meehan grave yard glimmers mosaic and accompanying poem jenny meehan

grave yard glimmers mosaic and accompanying poem jenny meehan ©jenny meehan

 

 

The Grave Yard Glimmers

 

Under grey ground

my shattered self, recovered

crept gentle, back to the moment

when

a younger me-child

within

Summer holiday sunshine

discovered

picking, glass, stones, off graves

was an open treasure chest.

Even while the body laid low…

sighing with relief…

anticipating release…

for each passing moment.

 

Simple time steps.

One strand of self to

reflect

back to me.

 

Porous ceramic spreads moisture

Yet only a shadow

touches

meeting edges

I am sorry that I left, and still sometimes leave

these parts of me behind.

 

Much later,  my rape was a vacation of another kind.

 

I hover, momentarily, over my body

unable to take in, even in  consciousness

the un-do- able

which was done.

 

It takes years to cry.

And bodies lie under the floor

even in houses.

 

Light still

makes glimmers

Glimmers in eyes

meeting.

Glimmers in finding

pieces

all broken

but beautiful.

 

l hold hope, for you

my friend, and myself

on dream-like, flattened

slates… to write all over

a past story, a new one…

 

We wash the silver ore, and smelt it

in the smiles of those we love.

 

Jenny Meehan

August 2018

 

 

Looking forward to working with mosaic in November, tutored by Vanessa Benson, whose inspirational course at West Dean College this year has kicked me off in this direction!

Realising my poetry and all the visual work I do are inseparable.  Well, I knew this already, but now I know it more.  Also, I will always be a materials orientated artist.  One who handles my own materials.

The most annoying saying “Everyone is an artist”.  Is everyone a plumber too?  The role of an artist has a broad skill set attached.

Everyone is innately creative, yes, but everyone is not an artist.  I hate walking past Cass Art and seeing the motto… it’s something like “Let’s fill this town with artists”.  Sounds like a nightmare to me.  Do you want a town filled with artists?   Would be quite a poor town, for a start! But it would, of course, be ideal for the local art shop!!! At least they are honest!

I was reading recently that a survey found most artists earn between £1,000 and £5,000 a year. That sounds about right.  I kind of felt relieved on reading it.  It is hard when you live in a world where finance reflects value.  I know I am doing what I should be doing in life, and feel extremely grateful, that finally, after years of waiting, I am able to work at the work which feels most natural to me.  It’s not to be taken for granted.  But it isn’t a “job” in the proper sense. And all the other work I have done in the past is very relevant, and has been valuable in many different respects.  It’s made me who I am.  I wasn’t unhappy in the work I previously did.  Just not quite so fulfilled. But there are many aspect to being fulfilled in life, and there were parts of me which probably developed, in a good way, which I might have avoided, if I was art working then.   Discipline is important. For an artist, if you have not got it, you cannot be productive, I don’t think.  Getting up each morning to do what you must, is part of every occupation, and we don’t always feel like it!

And now, I cannot rely on a “job” to define who I am.  It’s sometimes challenging.  Like being a mother, I guess.  The key thing is, I think, not to confuse status or money with value. It’s always a challenge! What I do does pay for itself.   Sometimes I feel discouraged, but it’s only passing.  Thankfully enough good things happen to keep me motivated!

 

 

Thelma Narrative Series

My Thelma sculpture project was in 2014 and it is now 2018!   In truth, the project is not finished, because I got a mould made of the essential base of Thelma and intend to make some plaster versions in order to experiment further.  Indeed, I will.  Yet for now, here are the images with text, which does seem to have a degree of being a complete work.  The actual wax sculpture is in a box in my cupboard, and now and again I pick bits off it and add bits on!  It is one figure, which I moved through a series of transformations without thinking about concepts  in a conscious way.

ONEthelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentationONEthelma psychodynamic jenny meehan

ONEthelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation THELMA ONE

 

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation THELMA TWO

 

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation THELMA THREE

 

 

 

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation THELMA FOUR

 

 

 

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation THELMA FIVE

 

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation THELMA SIX

 

This is probably my favourite in the series…It’s the one I associate with the ongoing process of participating in psychotherapy!  Hard work, at times,  yes,  but something which can be a tool in bringing freedom from the negative consequences of violence, abuse, and trauma.  This time I spend in therapy is an investment I choose because I value self reflection so much.  Participation in Psychotherapy can be viewed two ways.  One, is that of being a practice of WELLNESS…Which for me, it now is, thankfully. (Mostly)  It’s like going to the gym to keep fit.  (Mostly, not always! Sometimes it’s painful and hard! Still challenging, still uncomfortable. Always will be! )

I find it very harmonious with being an artist, and working in the way that I do with other people with mentoring/spiritual direction/teaching art.  The other way that psychotherapy can be viewed might be summed up with “Gosh, they must be very screwed up to need therapy” maybe?  It is the idea that someone would only participate in psychotherapy if they really had to, because it wasn’t possible to carry on without it.  Because why would they want to do take part in something like that otherwise?  Well, I do understand that perspective.

Personally, I did start my psychoanalytic journey in a very distressing place, and I knew it was what I needed, and things were often very alarming and extremely difficult.  So it wasn’t optional in any sense in 2011.  Yet my journey, and the experience gained from working with a very good therapist, has been so valuable and positive, it seems needless not to carry on with it, as long as it bears fruit, which it does.  I do review it from time to time, but so far, I reach the same conclusion, which is why stop for the sake of stopping?  It might be different if I was not an artist, but it’s become part of the process of my artistic creating, and it’s so useful, even for that, even apart from the other benefits.

It feels like pulling a net through my own depths, pulling it along the sea bed.  It’s an effort, but somehow drawing deep in myself in this way produces a lot of goodness.  Life is vastly improved, and I feel so much more alive than I ever used to be.  So the effort is definitely worth it for me.

Thoughts on the sculpture…

Difficulty of wading forwards… Trolling is a method of fishing….  There is a huge sense of continuity and flow, in this one, with metal outside of the figure clearly relating to the which goes through it’s core.  Through the waters of my mind, in the psychoanalytic work I am doing.  Found this, it’s helpful..

Bodies of Water and the Unconscious
Often in dreams, large bodies of water (oceans, lakes, pools) symbolize the unconscious. As with bodies of water, we often see the surface, but cannot easily see into the depths.

Also, the vastness of the ocean symbolizes the vastness of the unconscious mind. Jung observed long ago that the unconscious mind was much vaster than the conscious portion. His insight has been confirmed by fascinating developments in neuroscience, where new technologies, such as particularly sophisticated MRIs have enabled brain scientists to see that the unconscious processes in the brain dwarf the conscious mind in magnitude.

In those regions of the brain/mind lies the meaning of dreams. Jungian therapy is always aware that, for each of us, much goes on in the depths of those oceanic waters…”  quoted from https://www.briancollinson.ca/index.php/2012/11/jungian-therapy-the-meaning-of-dreams-5-water.html

 

WOW!  The unconscious mind….

Oceanic Waters!

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation THELMA SEVEN

 

Must be the faith aspect coming through in this one!

 

 

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation

thelma psychodynamic jenny meehan personal development psychotherapy and art relationship investigation psychoanalytic visual experimentation   THELMA EIGHT

No doubt some  theme of healing…  And in this one, a mould was made, and the body cast in plaster.

 

Interesting looking back at these.  Rather funny that I depicted my right thigh with what looks like a strip of metal along it.  This was before my knee replacement and before I was having problems with my walking!   Plaster for me is evocative of healing and holding, and showing this  liquid flow over the now plaster form, is something I like a lot.  The flow may be static in that the plaster is set,  but it is suggestive of flow and continuity by it’s very shape, and the meeting point between those forms of underlying form and dripped plaster brings some awareness of touch and being touched to my mind.  As the final figure is the model cast, it’s a new creation but still intimately related to the former figure in brown wax.   I will continue working with this, and post up soon.

 

So this is September…OOOps… Late again, October!

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

 

Painting “Upper Room” by Jenny Meehan 70 x 50cm   This is available, contact me if interested.  Use contact form on my personal website jamartlondon.com  http://www.jamartlondon.com/

Direct link to contact page; http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742

Bit about my painting…

About Jenny Meehan’s Paintings

My process led painting…romantic, expressionistic, abstract and lyrical, is simply the result of my own contemplative practice, which I work through in many ways. Let by instinct and intuition, inspired by my own life experiences, and several much loved artists, including Klee, Hitchens, Claude Venard, Matisse and Kandinsky, it provides the ground for the viewer’s own interpretations and responses, and will be whatever you want it to be. My own titles reflect my own interpretation/,sense of meaning, but the beauty and openness of non objective painting allows you a place in the process exclusively yours!

The image doesn’t show the extent to which texture, and various surface finishes are used in the painting, for example, I use tiny glass beads for their effects on light hitting the surface of the painting. Maybe they could be seen as a dance of light and colour? Certainly, as the light in the day changes, the appearance of the painting changes considerably, with different parts being emphasised and other parts sinking into the background. This painting is one which responds, and I hope you get pleasure from viewing it! See more at http://www.jamartlondon.com

 

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images©jenny meehan

 

Boat House, Monotype. ©jenny meehan

Sometimes the simplest of things can give pleasure.  I am looking at this one at the moment, particularly as I think about how I will approach working with mosaic in November.  I think to start with some kind  of simple forms, rectangular, square, maybe a good start.  I don’t see myself going into the pictorial.  I suspect I will need to seriously spend time considering the materials I use.  They will suggest a way forwards, I am sure.  And I want to make more effort with this linkage between my poetry and visual expression. I think that’s key for me.

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images©jenny meehan

Icy Landscape ©jenny meehan

A major theme of my work is recovery from trauma.  The subject of an internal landscape dominates my creative practice.  Tiny glass beads are used in the above painting and they catch the light, transforming the appearance of the work at different times of the day.

 

“Eternal” Painting by Jenny Meehan

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images©jenny meehan

Eternal by Jenny Meehan ©jenny meehan

This is one of my paintings which has been licensed for use as a book cover. The cover designer was Alison Beek.   I really like my paintings being used in this way, and it is a small source of income which helps sustain my artistic practice, so it’s very much valued.

https://wordery.com/quiet-spaces-prayer-journal-mrs-olivia-warburton-9780857465245?currency=GBP&gtrck=S2Z1YnlZVlZsTTV6K1BVYkdyNERsL2JwTWhWcHA3dnM5bERaeTRueE1KNndyem4vbG5ENFJSV2tycFVKK0tnUHpISjRLNFJMY2hnaWJHb2hMMGg4UlE9PQ&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIyLOtiOTn3QIVROd3Ch13IwVCEAQYAyABEgJmVPD_BwE

Finding God in all things, hearing God’s voice for ourselves and others…the Quiet Spaces Prayer Journal will help you to develop and maintain a life of creative prayer. With space to write, quotations drawn from Christian tradition and BRF’s Quiet Spaces publication to aid reflection, this is ideal to buy for yourself or as a gift for anyone wanting to deepen their prayer life. It features quotations to inspire, allowing plenty of space to write.

Quiet Spaces Prayer Journal Spiral bound edition by Mrs Olivia Warburton”

Edited by Mrs Olivia Warburton ISBN-139780857465245Format Spiral bound, Publisher BRF (The Bible Reading Fellowship) Publication date23 Sep 2016Pages192Product dimensions 150 x 210 x 14mm E Weight338g

Quiet Spaces is BRF’s prayer and spirituality journal. Published three times a year, each edition journeys through up to nine themes drawn from the Bible, spiritual writers, the natural world, the lives of Christians from across the centuries or from Christian spiritual traditions. Each theme is explored in twelve prayerful ways using creative activities, your personal faith experience, poetry, liturgy, reflection, imagining and meditation, helping you into a heart encounter with God. Ideal both for those who have discovered the benefits of reflection, meditation and contemplation and are looking for a resource to guide their periods of quiet and for people coming to reflection and meditation for the first time.”

 

I use my own copy!

 

This months post is September and October combined! It’s my aim to write a bit less on my journal each month and work more on my poetry.  As I mentioned at the beginning, a brilliant course on mosaic at West Dean college tutored by Vanessa Benson has provided some interesting routes in using mosaic, and along with my other ongoing experiments with silica sol mineral paint I want to immerse myself more in silence and music and poetry than longer blog entries.  And drumming too.  I am loving my djembe, and enjoying learning some traditional West African patterns.

I think I may have exhausted my writing capacity a little bit when writing “The Very Patient Knee Replacement Story by Jenny Meehan” last year!  By the way, the knee is working wonderfully.  It’s an “Attune” knee.  I am no longer disabled and able to live a full life. I am so grateful for the South West London Elective Orthopaedic Centre, and the NHS.  My life would be quite different without such a positive experience.

west dean college short course jenny meehan flora and foliage images© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

west dean college short course jenny meehan flora and foliage images© Jenny Meehan

 

Really enjoying these…

http://openchurch.network/chalketalk

That’s me for now!

Do take a look at my website. http://www.jamartlondon.com/

I will be updating it over December.  I have a lot more work than I can show on the internet.

 

 

 

 

small world futures chapbook sampson low publishers

small world futures chapbook

 

I enjoyed taking part in the Small World Futures project earlier on this year.

And look here….. The delightful chap book!

HUGE thanks to Collect Connect for all their hard work!

Title:  Small World Futures – A CollectConnect Production at the #unsettledgallery

It’s published by Sampson Low Ltd, 2018

http://www.sampsonlow.com/

Chapbook 24

LB088

ISBN 978-1-910578-80-3

All rights reserved.

Text quoted from the sampson low website:

“The tradition of chapbook publishing in England is a long established one and here at Sampson Low Ltd we think it’s the perfect format for our most exciting authors and artists. Although small (A6) and relatively brief (16 printed pages) our punchy publications share their ideas with you in one delicious sitting.”   and see here:

https://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/articles/chapbooks

This wonderful chapbook is the remaining evidence for the exhibition which took place in public spaces around London Bridge.

Info: Small World Futures is a collection of 38 miniature sculptures depicting what life could look like in years to come. Each of these small artworks will be placed in public spaces (#unsettledgallery) around London Bridge. A writer will also use the worlds as inspiration.
Venue
#unsettledgallery
Starts
Thursday, February 1, 2018
Ends
Wednesday, February 28, 2018
Address
London Bridge, London
Location
London
Organiser
CollectConnect” 

I love this kind of thing…  I sometimes moan a bit about not showing my work as much as I would like because of costs involved.  Something like this gets the work out there on the street.  OK, you have to be prepared to loose it.  But that’s not a bad thing now and again.  I liked very much the writing on my work…I am pretty sure I published it here on this Journal a few posts back.

How good to now have this chapbook as a record!   Do go and buy one for yourself.

https://sampsonlow.co/chapbooks/

vibe drome by jenny meehan

vibe drome by jenny meehan

 

Kingston Artists’ Open Studios (OS18)

Kingston Artists’ Open Studios (OS18) took place on 9/10th and 16/17th June 2018 from 11am to 5pm each day.

It was a really good year, and very enjoyable.

Here are some images of my paintings in situ…

kingston artists open studios jenny meehan paintings in situ

KAOS open studios jenny meehan paintings

KAOS open studios jenny meehan paintings

KAOS open studios jenny meehan paintings

KAOS open studios jenny meehan paintings

Kingston Artists’ Open Studios is a voluntary group, and we need and appreciate all the support we can get. If you think you could help us in anyway, do contact us via the link below.  Visual art is important to the health of society, bringing pleasure, connection, and space for contemplation.  The value is not easy to measure maybe, but it is always worth investment.

Hope to see you at this even next year, maybe?  !Jenny Meehan

http://www.kingstonartistsopenstudios.co.uk/

http://www.jamartlondon.com/

 

kingston artists open studios jenny meehan

kingston artists open studios jenny meehan  image from 2017

 

Image shows paintings of Jenny Meehan and ceramics by Cressida Borrett  http://www.cressidaborrett.co.uk/

Contact me via my contact page at jamartlondon if you would like more information!

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742

 

Looking backwards and moving forwards…

Or moving forwards and looking backwards?  !!!

This old post from 2012…

This painting…  I liked it, and it was exhibited at The Ark Conference Centre in Basingstoke.  Titled “Sorrow for Myself”.

sorrow for myself, abstract colour markmaking painting, human figure, depression, grief,trauma, loss,psychotherapy and art,jenny meehan fine and applied art,british contemporary abstract fine painting,subconscious subject matter,emotional release,lyrical abstraction,lyrical markmaking,instinctive intuitive process led painting,

The narrative:  The weight is heavy. The sun sets. Broken fragments are carried away. Down stream.  This is sorrow.  Sorrow for myself.  Blood is shed, but it is the blood of Christ which covers. God is compassionate.

The reference:  “Yet it was our weaknesses he carried;

it was our sorrows  that weighed him down.

And we thought his troubles were a punishment from God,

a punishment for his own sins!”

We think about being sorry for ourselves as a bad thing.  But it’s not what I meant with using the term “Sorrow for myself”.   I have allowed myself  to feel sorrow for myself, and to feel the sadness which I previously did not allow very much room for in my life.  It seems to be for me a process of allowing myself to feel compassionate towards myself.   I picked up this painting last year and decided to continue to work on it.  I have now titled it “Kaleidoscope” …

Not a great image of it…  Main archive image is still in the camera, but this will do for now.

Also I am increasingly deciding to put watermarks over my images.  It’s a boring job to contact websites and get them to remove images they have no permission and/or license to use.  Very boring.

©jenny meehan kaleidoscope painting jenny meehan process led painting abstract lyrical british colourist

kaleidoscope painting jenny meehan ©jenny meehan

 

The story behind this title is as follows;   I had a  vision while at an Ignatian Retreat Day at the Mount Street Jesuit Centre a while back where I could see I was holding a kaleidoscope in my hands and lamenting the broken pieces in it.  Then Jesus, or rather, Yeshua the Messiah… (Digression!  So many people just use the words “Jesus Christ” meaninglessly, I am seriously wondering if I might be best to use Yeshua, as it’s more in the historical context and I don’t hear people using it carelessly!) Anyway, back to the point.   He placed his hand on mine and told me to lift the kaleidoscope to my eyes and point it at him.  He guided my hand to turn it and as I did so beautiful light and patterns flowed through it, and the patterns went on forever and ever and they were always changing and all completely different.   Both looking at the brokenness, which was a sorrowful process,  and looking through the kaleidoscope, which was wonderful,  are important.   It was hard to allow Yeshua to touch my hand.  Maybe I felt like a leper, as we had been meditating on Yeshua healing the leper?  Maybe?  I wonder if the turning motion was the process of repentance?  It would seem so based on my current reflections and thoughts.  A continual process.   Allowing our Creator God to turn us around?  Writing words about it seems shoddy and clumsy.  But I continue to think about it.  And to title the painting with its continued work “Kaleidoscope” is just right.

Here it is now.  I showed it at this years Kingston Artists’ Open Studios.

I sell my paintings when they have been exhibited and/or I no longer need them for study and reflection. I don’t sell more than a handful each year. It’s great when they find someone to own them.  Makes more room in my house for the new ones too!  I am increasingly not using frames as they take up a lot of room.  I am now starting to work on card and other substrates rather than stretched canvas.

 

Tiny Bones Poem by Jenny Meehan

 

Tiny Bones

I trod on fragments of bone;
Homosexual, Jew and gypsy.
Unknowingly desecrating
precious loved ones,
with my soles.

A heartless, human realisation –
I did not know, until the man told me.
When he spoke,
my world changed.
Brokenness took a new meaning.
Even the tiniest
prejudice
is a terrible thing.

I took one of the splinters –
pressed it
into my skin
and wept.

Jenny Meehan

lasting stones of memory painting by jenny meehan for holocaust memorial day kingston

lasting stones of memory painting by jenny meehan for holocaust memorial day kingston

 

 

“Surface Work”  Exhibition across Victoria Miro’s London galleries  VERY GOOD INDEED!

This was good… VERY GOOD.  When I found out about it it was straight into the diary.  Essential viewing for any female abstract artist. And other folk too, of course!  I wrote about this a little bit in my last post.  But here is more information…

Some text from the website:

“An international, cross-generational exhibition of women artists who have shaped and transformed, and continue to influence and expand, the language of abstract painting.

Information
Private View 6-8pm, Wednesday 11 April 2018

14 St George Street, London W1S 1FE
Tuesday-Saturday 10am-6pm

Taking place across Victoria Miro’s London galleries, this international, cross-generational exhibition is a celebration of women artists who have shaped and transformed, and continue to influence and expand, the language and definition of abstract painting.”

It included the following female artists:

The exhibition includes: Rita Ackermann, Etel Adnan, Gillian Ayres, Sara Barker, Lynda Benglis, Suzanne Blank Redstone,
Betty Blayton, Sandra Blow, Sarah Cain, Varda Caivano, Lygia Clark, Prunella Clough, Angela de la Cruz, Jay DeFeo,
Svenja Deininger, Lucy Dodd, Louise Fishman, Helen Frankenthaler, Mary Heilmann, Ilse D’Hollander, Loie Hollowell,
Tess Jaray, Martha Jungwirth, Bharti Kher, Lee Krasner, Yayoi Kusama, Agnes Martin, Joan Mitchell, Katy Moran, Annie
Morris, Rebecca Morris, Victoria Morton, Elizabeth Murray, Dala Nasser, Elizabeth Neel, Tomie Ohtake, Betty Parsons,
Howardena Pindell, Liubov Popova, Fiona Rae, Mary Ramsden, Dorothea Rockburne, Jackie Saccoccio, Mira Schendel,
Yuko Shiraishi, Raphaela Simon, Pat Steir, Hedda Sterne, Alma Thomas, Mildred Thompson, Adriana Varejão, Paule
Vézelay, Jessica Warboys and Mary Weatherford”

List of works:

https://www.victoria-miro.com/usr/documents/exhibitions/list_of_works_url/items/45/454bb64bd0bd410bbd30ffb8d4d2b9cb/surface-work-mayfair-walking-list-final.pdf

Quote from press release:

“Surface Work takes its title from a quote by the Abstract Expressionist painter Joan Mitchell, who said: ‘Abstract is not a style. I simply want to
make a surface work.’ The exhibition reflects the ways in which women have been at the heart of abstract art’s development over the past
century, from those who propelled the language of abstraction forward, often with little recognition, to those who have built upon the legacy of
earlier generations, using abstraction to open new paths to optical, emotional, cultural, and even political expression. Historical and
contemporary works shown in dialogue will create a series of conversations across the decades, touching on themes such as the monochrome,
process, geometric abstraction, seriality and gesture.”

News coverage example:

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2018/apr/15/surface-work-victoria-miro-review-women-abstract-painting?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Guide to the exhibition:

http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/8554a0b8#/8554a0b8/1

I posted some images last month.

 

victoria miro surface works visit 2018

victoria miro surface works visit 2018

 

The painting above, WELL…That’s paint! It’s inspiring!

Adriana Varejão
Azulejão (Moon), 2018
Oil and plaster on canvas
180 x 180 cm
70 7/8 x 70 7/8 in

 

On the way home I sat at Waterloo station and enjoyed the view!

 

 

waterloo station image jenny meehan

Romantic Abstract Expressionistic Lyrical Paintings by Jenny Meehan British female painter

When I get to archiving my current work by processing the images and information I promise I will post them up on this journal.  But this time of year is the important and vital painting season for me.  I need to paint now because I use my studio tent and it is most usable at this time of year.  Kitchen and garden are also handy, but as my paints and tools are all out, sorted and ready to roll, painting has to come first.  This is the least piecemeal part of the year… from March to September and  this is because I focus and drive ahead in all respects. Practically it works best.  Image taking, admin, and all the rest are confined to the darker weeks and days, the colder and the wetter times.  Yes, times like that still occur, this is the UK, of course, and I let the weather determine my course of action and artistic activities.  So my website remains a little need in an update, and digital tasks pile up.  Housework piles up.  All piles up, but the most necessary.  It’s actually much easier to structure things this way than try and equalise the process.  I do write this artist’s journal, but that is because I love to write!  However, this explains the lack of new images of more recent paintings.     So repetition of paintings displayed on this artist’s blog is the necessary result.  Never mind.  Cannot do everything!

catastrophe becoming painting 100days100women.wordpress.com, abstract expressionist lyrical romantic painting, jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

catastrophe becoming painting by jenny meehan submitted to 100days100women.wordpress.com british collectable abstract paintings ©jenny meehan

 

This is one of my personal favourites.  It’s got a great surface…I am pleased with what I have achieved.  This is one of my best achievements.

©jenny meehan DACS

seaside details ©jenny meehan DACS

This is a detail from “Sea Side”.  How annoying… The full painting image is on one of my hard drives and not on this newer computer.  I have extracts but no full view available right now to post.  Never mind!

 

seaside details

©jenny meehan DACS

seaside details ©jenny meehan DACS

seaside details

seaside details

seaside details

©jenny meehan DACS romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

seaside details

seaside details

seaside details

seaside details

seaside details

summer seaside details romantic expressionist lyrical abstract painting by jenny meehan jennifer meehan

summer seaside details romantic expressionist lyrical abstract painting by jenny meehan jennifer meehan

©jenny meehan DACS romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

seaside details

©jenny meehan DACS romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

seaside details

seaside details

©jenny meehan DACS romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

seaside details

©jenny meehan DACS romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

seaside details

©jenny meehan DACS romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

seaside details

©jenny meehan DACS romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

seaside details

©jenny meehan DACS romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

seaside details

©jenny meehan DACS romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

©jenny meehan DACS
romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artistseaside details

 

All this dancing and prancing around with painting… lyrical and brushmarks, experimentation and exploration.   I am pushing ahead.

 

This is another sound painting.  As it is the seaside time of year here in the UK…As much as possible,  this is a good one to show now. The side side is one of my favourite places.  Both positive memories from the past and current pleasure inform the feeling.  As my childhood was more sad than not, I hold onto the happy parts most keenly because they were gifts and I am glad I received them.

 

drop in the ocean painting jenny meehan romantic lyrical abstraction expressionist abstract fine painting drop in the ocean painting jenny meehan

british collectable abstract paintings ©jenny meehan DACS
romantic abstract lyrical painting british female contemporary artist

Ah thank goodness for that “Drop in the Ocean” painting is at least to be found in completeness!

These two go very well together. Not surprising really!   I am selling these, so contact me if interested, via my website;  jamartlondon.com

I sell my paintings when no longer needed for study and exhibition purposes.  At between £200 and £500 only, they are very good value indeed.  For a high quality original abstract painting, you may need to look quite a long way for something in this price bracket.  I sell my original paintings to enable me to continue to invest my time and effort into the painting endeavour.  Developing my work, materials, research and study all involve time and money.  It’s a matter of passion in the end.  Any support is welcome and appreciated.

It’s bye bye for now.

Cannot believe it took until the 18th of the month to get this done.

Never mind.

 

 

After having left my February post on the late side, I am getting the March post in early!  The piecemeal nature of this journal continues its meandering way, as I do mine, making my way through the vast expanse called life!

 

Desiderata written in 1927 by Max Ehrmann

Someone pointed me in the direction of this lovely piece of writing, which I share with you.

Desiderata

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence.
As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons.
Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others,
even to the dull and ignorant; they too have their story.

Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit.
If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter,
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.
Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.

Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.
Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals,
and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection. Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment it is as perennial as the grass.
Take kindly the counsel of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.

Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself.
You are a child of the universe no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be.
And whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life,
keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.

 

This has been quoted from the following website:  https://www.poemhunter.com/max-ehrmann-2/

Desiderata was written in 1927 by Max Ehrmann, a poet and lawyer from Terre Haute, Indiana. The word desiderata means “things that are desired.” Ehrmann said he wrote it for himself, “because it counsels those virtues I felt most in need of.”

There are also many audio versions of Desiderata by Max Ehrmann, for example the following:

 

 

 

This journal; this “meandering discourse”, serves to educate you on what happens alongside my painting and visual artwork. Though I don’t often make direct references to all that inspires me, confronts me, meets me, greets me and generally impacts my life, and therefore my work,  (which is just as well to be honest, because the important meaning in your relationship with my painting is based upon your own life and experience, not mine), however, my painting is one facet of the whole, not the whole, and folk often like to know about the creator behind the art.  Sharing what inspires me, may add a dimension to someones experience of my work, and this is something which can add some depth.  Many artists are also writers, and/or musicians.  It’s good to have different forms to hand.  I think writing for me has relieved me of some pressures, and given me a place to explore concepts through a medium I find best suited to it.  With painting I am relieved of any need to say or sound anything other than the materials I work with, the rhythms of painting are poetic and resonate emotionally, free of any need to be or say anything other than they are.  And that feels good and liberating to me.  So I write regularly and this is helpful.  It is a very useful tool to have, among the paintbrushes, rollers, and collection of materials.  And now I have started to learn hand drumming, which is probably the best new activity I have started for years.  This links in with my painting; the connection being rhythms and resonance, and presence and space and all those things which words don’t quite manage to express!

I learnt one of the rhythms from Sinte last night!

 Kingston Artists’ Open Studios 2018

Getting ready for this year’s Kingston, Surrey Artist’s Open Studios.

Kingston Artists’ Open Studios (OS18) will be taking place on 9/10th and 16/17th June 2018 from 11am to 5pm each day. I will be enjoying the kind hospitality of one of my KAOS artist companions just a short walk from Kingston Town centre, not far from the Kingston Gate of Richmond Park.

It would make a lovely day out to follow a few of the trails in and out of artist’s homes and studio spaces, so do come along!

For more details, please contact me via the contact page on jamartlondon.com. I will put you on my mailing list and send further information as soon as available!

Hope to see you! Jenny Meehan

 

Bits and Bobs

I post past work up from time and time.  I find it helpful to look back fairly often and ask new questions about what I was doing and why.  It also reminds me of what matters to me, and how certain strands have developed over the years.  It’s essential in order to come up with new directions, because in looking back you actually see things anew and recognise the elements of your work which you still like and which interest you.  Like old friends, who know you well, they often offer important insights!  Here is some past work:

 

“Round and Round Inside My Head” Monoprint  by Jenny Meehan

Oil based ink, graphite, and oil pastel on paper.

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

I don’t use linear elements in my work so much now, or when I do they are hidden lines formed not from direct application of a media but from edges and the meetings of other forms.  I have recently started using tearings and collage a bit more and this is bringing line into my vocabulary once more.  I have been once again inspired by Francis Davidson, whose work I saw again at the end of last year, and this exhibition was helpful to me.  I likes the strips very much and this has given me a few thoughts about future direction which are very timely.  I don’t tend to talk about my thoughts for the future in any detail as they need incubation time, and it is easy to diffuse things before they have properly had a chance to grow.

I think of Henry Moore saying ” It is a mistake for a sculptor or a painter to speak or write very often about his job. It releases tension needed for his work. (Henry Moore). I heard or read that quote years ago and it has stuck with me.  I completely “get” this.   I love writing and have decided to keep the sharing of my work to this Journal, rather than use Instagram.  I did start using Instagram, but felt this “dissolve” immediately.  As far as I understand it is thought best for artists to share their work in progress. Because this is interesting.  People are interested in  how artists make their work.  However this feels like a violation to me.  This is probably due to the way I personally work, because I work in such a piecemeal, gradual, and extended process, with work coming out and being put away, over a period of years. Privacy is part of the process.  It’s not that I don’t share work in progress at all, because I do.  But I don’t want the pressure of feeling I need to supply a stream of my work to other people before it has found itself and feels some degree of its own resolution.

If my work was different, I don’t think this would be an issue.  For example, if I was sketching and making work which went from start to finish in one fell swoop, I don’t think I would feel the same way about using Instagram.  Slightly conversely, this journal gives me a chance to share about my work but in a way which is limited, quiet, and doesn’t have the effect of diluting any of the energy.  I don’t talk about my work very much at all to other people, only quite rarely.  I find it interesting being a visual artist in this current age, where so much is public that would not have been public in years gone by.  It gives me some pleasure that my writing is here for people to read if they are interested, but I see this Journal as being as much a tool for my own development as it may be for “the public” eye.   It is the only organised writing I have, because the rest floats around all over the place, in small notebooks and pieces of paper!   The organisation of it, in the  liquid “stream of consciousness form, may be it’s prime virtue! Kind of not chaos and not order, but between the two!

Below is  “Baptism/Into the Ocean” Painting by jenny meehan

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

It looks equally good rotated to the left and displayed as portrait…  This is available for sale so contact me via my website contact page at jamartlondon.com if interested.  http://www.jamartlondon.com/

It’s got a lot of energy!

“Pillar and Moon”  below is also available.  http://www.jamartlondon.com/

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

 

This digital photographic work below evolved from a photograph taken in Oxshott Woods, one of my favourite places.  I went there each Sunday as a child and continue to make regular walks through the woods!

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

 

Henry Moore Quotes

I quoted Henry Moore earlier and found several quotes from him I would like to take note of:

The important thing is somehow to begin. (Henry Moore)

If an artist tries consciously to do something to others, it is to stretch their eyes, their thoughts, to something they would not see or feel if the artist had not done it. To do this, he has to stretch his own first. (Henry Moore)

To be an artist is to believe in life. (Henry Moore)

Art is a continuous activity with no separation between past and present. (Henry Moore)

 

Jenny Meehan on Redbubble.com

Redbubble is a great “print on demand” website and I have some of my images there.  The world is full of fabulous artists and Redbubble is a good place for buying merchandise which is original, exciting and contemporary.  The artists on Redbubble get a royalty payment from any items that you purchase there, so it is one way to support the creative community and help artists gain a little bit of income from their work.  Do take a look!

https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams?asc=u

I haven’t put much up new, but did add this a few months ago:

https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/works/29863227-dyno-blue-wall-tapestry-design-by-jenny-meehan?asc=u&ref=recent-owner

It’s called “Dyno Blue”.  Quick burst of activity on the computer, and there it is!  The wonders of technology!

dyno blue tapestry design jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

dyno blue tapestry design jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

 

Gum Arabic Preparation

I was recently looking over some experimental paintings I had made with  home made watercolour paints.  The paints still look great in their pots.  I made mine to keep in liquid form and put more clove oil in them.  They are keeping very well.  I really enjoyed making them and it much easier to be lavish and generous when using materials which are more affordable.  All the pigments used were mineral, earth, iron oxides or mixes, and and NO FILLER at all!  It is great to have better control possible through being the master or mistress of your own fillers!!!!

I didn’t use honey, (I don’t think, or I may have just put a bit in, cannot remember!!!) but as said, I wasn’t trying to make blocks, and kept it liquid!  Here is the recipe I used but I used my slow cooker.

Gum Arabic Preparation
Ingredients
• 300 grams (10.5 oz) Gum Arabic powder
• 3 drops Clove Oil (optional)
• 1 liter (2.1 pints) of boiled water
The ratio is 1 part gum to 2 parts water. Boil water and pour over the powdered gum, stirring to make sure there are no lumps. Allow the mixture to soak 24-48 hours for full absorption.
Add drops of Clove Oil to extend shelflife. Prepared Gum Arabic must be stored in the refrigerator to deter mold growth. It may be advisable to make small batches so the solution will be fresh rather than storing larger quantities for an extended period of time.
Watercolor Preperation
• Prepared Gum solution (Arabic or Tragacanth)
• Honey (Acacia is preferable) in a 10% proportion to the weight of Gum solution used
• Pigments
Mix all the ingredients and crush them on a glass plate using a spatula to obtain a paste with a thick, creamy consistency. It is recommended that you finish the mixture by crushing it with a glass muller (available at art supply stores). Transfer your paints to saucers for painting. When creating your initial gum, you may wish to addGlycerin as a plasticizer to prevent cracking and brittleness. The ratio would be 1 part Glycerin or less by volume to 5 parts of your prepared gum solution. Add the Glycerin after gum has been completely dissolved but while still warm.

I still have my gum arabic solution in the fridge, over a year later, and it still looks fine.  I use it in my hair at the moment, because I have made myself a single braid, and need to dip the end of it into the solution to make it easier to thread a bead through it!!!  I didn’t bother with grinding pigments….  I like using them a bit coarser, I prefer the way the light bounces off them.  If I was painting miniatures or tiny detailed paintings I guess I would want them finer but why use them finer unless you need to?

Studio Tent

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

The image above was taken in the Summer.  It’s still too cold in the studio tent at the moment, but I have started pottering around in there!

Below a few images of work.  These two “Yoga Inhale” and Yoga Exhale” paintings both sold.  I take lots of photographic images of my work, cropping and at different angles and orientations, as it is a helpful way of looking at what I have done.  Details also get forgotten.  Particularly if I don’t have the painting any more.  I use previous paintings for reference points all the time.

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

jenny meehan jamartlondon abstract expressionist lyrical textural colorist paintings licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon lyrical abstract expressionistic paintings in progress

New Knee Anniversary!

One year today, I had my knee replacement!  Now I have hit the one year mark I am stopping my piece of writing, which inhibits another page on this blog. https://jennymeehan.wordpress.com/the-very-patient-knee-replacement-story-by-jenny-meehan/

Not going to write much here about the knee, more than mention it.  The project is over!  My life goes on, and it’s a lot better than it was just over a year ago!

IMG_7305knee replacement in bed

Great Quote from Frank Auerbach

I enjoyed reading this interesting article:

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/may/16/frank-auerbach-when-paint-fantastic-time-lots-girls?CMP=share_btn_fb

My favourite part:

He says the obligation to take account of the art that has gone before carries two demands: “first that you attempt to do something of a comparable scale and standard, which is impossible; second that you try and do something that has never been done before, that is also impossible. So in the face of this you can either just chuck it in, or you can spend all your energy and time and hopes in trying to cope with it. You will fail. But as Beckett very kindly said for all of us, ‘try again, fail better’, and painting just took me over.”

That’s it for this month!

PS

If you would like to donate money to help support my creative practice I can accept donations quickly and easily through the Paypal.me process. Simply put the following in your browser:
paypal.me/jennymeehan and follow the prompts. Please consider supporting my work in this way if it strikes a chord with you and you are able to do so.  If you do this, there isn’t a system for me to contact you and thank you, so you will need to believe you have my heart felt thanks!

Another way you could support my participation in the visual arts could be by praying for me, if that’s part of your daily life. I also put some of my visual art work on the “print on demand” website redbubble.com. People buying merchandise with my designs on through redbubble.com results in my gaining a royalty for the use of the image concerned.

Signing up as a follower on this WordPress blog also helps, as does sharing the posts when you receive them.  Anything you can do to help me is much appreciated!  Time and money is limited for me, and it’s a challenge being a mother-artist in terms of promotion and increasing awareness of what I do.  I put my energy into producing my artwork.  For the rest, I need any help I can get!

Happy New Year!

I continue with my experiments with materials and a little bit of finishing off of paintings in progress.  I never work on one thing at a time.  I always need to have several paintings going on at once.  However, as I currently have well over 20 paintings on the go, I feel it would be a good idea to narrow down the range a little bit.

Though my plans are to paint on a bigger format, I still enjoy working on smaller pieces and I can see that continuing into the year.   I am mad to work on a bigger scale in so many respects, financial and practical.  But I cannot resist the temptation.   I feel that my painting is something that people should be able to immerse themselves in in the way that I enjoy immersing myself in it.  Making it bigger makes that easier I think.  So much is thrust at us visually.  We are completely bombarded with images from all angles.  Bigger in NOT better.  No way.  But it’s what I want.  It presents more challenges, and to be honest, I am so grateful for my mobility, that I feel if I don’t do it now, as the years go by, I cannot take for granted that I will be able to make bigger paintings later on.  Yet I must make bigger paintings which don’t take up too much room.  Because I don’t have enough room as it is!

I am also thinking about my oil paint.  I have a lot of it but am not using it in the way that I used to.  I am going to try and make some oil sticks with it, to use with my acrylic paintings.   I like making paints and enjoyed making my own watercolour paints a couple of years ago.  Making oil sticks will be fun too.

Here are some past oil paintings:

Oil Paintings “Poetic Landscape/When Trust Breaks” and “Alabaster Loving”

These two oil paintings are linked intimately with two of my poems, and I have enjoyed reviewing both the paintings and the poetry which accompanies them.

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved Oil painting based on one of the poems by Jenny Meehan

Part of coursework on a short course at West Dean College 2010© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

 

OOOps!   Due to moving things around on various hard drives I cannot locate the poem for the above painting right now!  Another time!

“Alabaster Loving”  is slightly later, finally resolved in the following poem:

Alabaster loving

I have hardened my heart.
Made a cave
within which I can hide away my flesh, bruised and dark.
Sobs in silence, surrounded
still
alone.

You came later, bearing gifts from afar…
Some nativity story you said, in recognition of me being the chosen one. Redeemer, and Saviour of your soul.

My love, holding the hope you hungered for…
But I could not carry it.
Each little spark of faith, placed religiously in rapid motion,
layer upon layer, tear upon tear, and sorrow upon sorrow.

You looked to me, and believed your self would define your better being
in a little child…
But I could not carry it.
“I wish you were like other mummys.” I say.
And you are sadder still.

I see them, with their children laughing.
I wish for my own fairy godmother,
able to transform rags.
Cinderella’s dress is blue with a bright bodice
Joy is not squeezed out of her, she lives.
Reality on the cover of a single book.

I am sorry for my hard heart. I know now
it must have hurt you, the reality.
I pulled myself together in such a tight knot
in order to preserve my life.
I did not mean to make a stone of it.

I remember wanting you on the coach back from Bexhill.
Lumps in my throat…(I had mumps),
but also bumps of sadness.
Looking out of the window, and seeing you in the distance
though you were not really there, as we had not got back yet.
I wanted to buy you some flowers, they were “Gypsophila”
(Commonly known as “Baby’s Breath”)
Small, white, and dry,
but pretty.

Then you were there,
I was glad to see you. You felt like my Mummy, and you looked after me.
But it didn’t seem to last very long.
The flowers, quite possibly,
may have outlived you.

I must be forgetting so many good times,
I am sorry for that. I know they are there.
But I cannot help wrapping the gifts in the paper you gave me.
It was not soft pink tissue, but earth brown, and protective.
I wish it were different.
Maybe it’s just too hard to think of the colours,
for they may only make the darkness darker?

“Commonly known as Baby’s Breath”

In tight knots of white
fight, outward
Tight
Clutch your bunch, in little hands
Finger strands reach
as thin fine stalks
balancing flowers
in air.

Know ” Gypsophila ” means gypsum- loving
Gypsum white
hard.
I’m making my dry flowers soggy
But my flesh is warm.

I think you are in heaven now,
It being a safe place, I know you are fine.
I know your maker knows you
and holds your story within his own flesh,
bound in holy suffering,
complete,
divine.

I know he knows my story, too…
Incomplete, but unravelling.

Unravelling as self-seeded flowers
Small and unpretending,
moisture loving, in the childhood garden.
Ever living little eyes, meeting mine.
No need of nurture, and
only spread by finding crevice or gap
in which to place and plant their fragile root.
Forget – Me -Nots
Lay their cloud-like carpet over the earth
winking dots of timid,
almost blue.

“The Creator thought he had finished giving the flowers their colours
he heard one whisper “Forget me not!”
There was nothing left but a very small amount of blue
but the forget-me-not was delighted to wear such a light blue shade.”

I can hold my stone, I need not throw it…
… hold it,
…bury it.
Not re-membered, exactly,
but neither
forgotten.

 

 

 

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved painting the poetic, art poetry, expressionist, lyrical abstraction, romantic, Alabaster Loving - Abstract Painting by Jenny Meehan

Alabaster Loving – Abstract Painting by Jenny Meehan. Relates to the Poem “Alabaster Loving”.
Painting the Poetic is probably the whole point of things for me! © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

 

 

Pat Steir Painting Video

While overcoming my jealousy with respect to the size of her studio, I loved watching this video.  I use some dripping paint in many of my paintings and love what it can bring to a painting,  and so I found seeing what Pat Steir does on a large scale working just with dripping fluid paint very interesting.

http://painters-table.com/blog/pat-steir-painting-vermont?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Painters+Table+-+Weekly+Update+-+October+10+2015&utm_content=Painters+Table+-+Weekly+Update+-+October+10+2015+CID_98eca7c15fb24f505654ebd1fb7159ac&utm_source=PT%20Email&utm_term=View%20the%20full%20post%20at%20Painters%20Table#.VhoewvlViko

St Paul’s Church of England, Hook, Surrey in the snow with blossom.

I cannot remember when I took this, but I love the combination of blossom and snow!  I think it must have been one Spring a couple of years ago.  This is my local church and we have been going there for  years now!  How time flies!

st pauls church of england church hook in snow

st pauls church of england church hook in snow

 

The Other Side of Chaos by Margaret Silf

Great quote:

“When we are in transition, depending on how serious the breakdown is, we may feel as though almost every aspect of life has been disrupted. The old certainties, the old habits and comfort zones, have been dive-bombed. The old home, the old job, the old “me,” may be almost gone. It may be the time to ask, “What is that essential core of who I am that remains through all this upheaval?” This is an important question, because it is this remnant that will be the starter for the new stage of our growth.
The thing about this remnant, this core of being, is that we often don’t discover it until the force of change has stripped away the outer layers of past certainties and securities. Just as the seeds of the eucalyptus trees in Australia can’t germinate until they are exposed to the intense heat of a forest fire, so, too, there may be deep parts of ourselves that are activated only when the shallower layers are stripped away.
And it isn’t just about survival; it is about growth and transformation. The new you that comes through the blast of change will not be just a shadow of your former self, but truly a new you, with deeper layers of your personal potential exposed and invited to grow and flourish. For example, through apparent disaster you may discover skills you never knew you had. You may discover qualities that had never previously been called upon, such as resilience, patience, ingenuity, empathy with others going through similar upheavals, and even a sense of humor to laugh through the tears and glimpse the rainbow through the rain.
—Excerpted from The Other Side of Chaos by Margaret Silf
– See more at: http://www.ignatianspirituality.com/19469/the-challenges-of-life?utm_source=emagislist&utm_medium=email&utm_content=201509&utm_campaign=emagis#sthash.2sf1vNEK.dpuf

Singing in the rain

It is rather wet, dark and very January!   This thought brings me to a fairly recently completed painting “Singing in the Rain”.  The joyous dance of colour along with the running paint marks makes a nice combination here.   I also often do a fair bit of walking backwards and forwards if I am at a turning point when painting, and I need to think about moving a painting forwards in a more definitive way, but am not sure which way to go.  A bit of dancing breaks up any dead ends too! Now I can do this pain free there is every reason to be singing in the rain, even when indoors!

Singing in the Rain abstract expressionist colourist lyrical painting by jenny meehan jamartlondon

Singing in the Rain abstract expressionist colourist lyrical painting by jenny meehan jamartlondon

This makes me think of the past painting “London Downpour” which is now in the hands of a collector:

London Downpour- Jenny Meehan painting abstraction at The Strand Gallery London as part of "Lines" visual art exhibition, jenny meehan jamartlondon london downpour process led painting british contemporary female abstract expressionistic painting, claude venard style work of london southbank tate modern river thames,contemporary emerging artist exhibition london.

London Downpour- Jenny Meehan painting abstraction at The Strand Gallery London as part of “Lines” visual art exhibition. Lyrical and geometric abstraction painting southbank london from the imagination! painted in a process-led, intuitive guided fashion, external impressions from regular trips to London appear to have seeped into my subconscious!

 

London Down Pour process led painting contemporary female painter Jenny Meehan southwark southbank memory based abstraction lyrical solid liquid dialectic,contemporary london south west based visual artist woman painter

 

I like looking back on different strands in my painting.  It seems to evolve in a cyclical way, with different strands being repeated on quite a regular basis.  This is why it is important to let your painting develop naturally and not artificially confine it, but spend time reflecting on what you have done in the past, while being willing to try completely new directions as well.

I think I posted this one before, but no harm in posting again.  It’s acrylic on canvas, mounted on board and framed under glass.

 

clog dance, sacred dance, dance inspired painting,clog dancing, jenny meehan, jamartlondon, licensable painting, painting for sale, contemporary british abstract painting, lyrical abstraction,colourist expressionist abstract, modernist romantic, 21st century painters,

clog dance/sacred dance abstract paintings colour

This Clog Dance/Sacred Dance is oil on stretched canvas.

It’s more structured and painted in oils which has changed my relationship with it a lot.  It was done while dancing in my clogs.  I like to dance when I paint, it helps a lot.  This one is still available.  If you are interested please contact me through my website jamartlondon.com.  There is a contact form there.

I have started posting some recent paintings on my website.  As I complete paintings this year I will post more up.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/

I need to think about what I will show at this year’s Kingston – upon – Thames,  Surrey based “Kingston Artists’ Open Studios”

It’s a nice event to take part in and if you would like to visit me and see some of my work, along with lots of other wonderful artists, then do pencil it in your diaries!  Time whizzes by!  This years Kingston Artists’ Open Studios  will be taking place on 9/10th and 16/17th June 2018 from 11am to 5pm each day.  It is open to all artists and makers living or working in the Kingston area.  Registration is happening right now!

A bit more about Surrey’s wonderful opportunity to meet artists and makers, from our website:

Kingston Artists Open Studios is a group of artists and makers based in and around Kingston. Our main annual event is our open studios when we open our studios to the public for two weekends in the summer. But our members are active throughout the year, taking part in exhibitions and events both nationally and internationally. See the events page for more details. For more information about our members please visit our artists pages.”

http://www.kingstonartistsopenstudios.co.uk/

 

Photography Examples – Jenny Meehan

I use photography as a type of creative meditation, and through the act of composing an image, the finely tuned observations I make inform and educate me with respect to the natural world.  Indeed, these representations serve as reminders to me and speak the abstract language of art just in their very being, enabling me to get to the root of natures meanings (in a mysterious, and felt sense). I then  hopefully retain some given aesthetic sensibility, which I can then use in my  paintings.   The beauty of natural forms is inspiring and I find it helpful to have images to hand of things I have seen from times I remember.  Even though I don’t translate the images directly into my paintings, it is the looking, seeing, noticing, and taking in of nature, and the creative inspiration behind all creation, which inspires my paintings and fuels the desire to carry on painting.  I have a lot of photography in my archives, and haven’t done very much with it, so I will share a little bit here with you!

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

 

These lovely day lilies were seen at West Dean Gardens, when I was on a course at West Dean College a few years back.

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

 

Suburban Meditations/Painter’s Development

I’ve been reviewing fondly many images I took in what I will call my wilderness years… The years when increasingly the sense of life disintegrated  and while life carried on externally pretty much as normal, internally I became increasingly aware  of that gaping void, the one we avoid…The depth of the personality which we sometimes fear investigating, because it is harder to face our innermost being than it is to focus on the frontage!   It seems wrong maybe to use the term “wilderness”  because I think that by wandering in the dry and difficult places of life, we often find that the source of life, the spring, the waters which take us into new places, come unexpectedly up from the hard ground.  Though I haven’t sorted through these images yet, and I will probably think further and arrange them with others into several collections,  I enjoyed reviewing them recently in the light of my present preoccupations with painting…I can see how that seed began to grow.  As I look at the images, and the instinct which led me to dwell so deeply on the fences, pavements, walls, and all the other places I walked through,  I can see myself gathering the matter which enchants me now as I experiment with painting in the way that I do.  My intense  desire to paint in the way that I do is surely founded on those walks and the way that I let myself become so absorbed with the surfaces which met me and which I took note of  by means of a camera shot.  The images vary in quality, and should be seen more as a personal record than anything else.  They are meditation, and meditation carried out at a time of searching and of internal turmoil.  I think I found some reassurance in the way that beauty could be discovered in the most unlikely places.  A sense of order, through experiments with composition. Beauty even in erosion, wearing down, and breakage.

The following images were taken as I walked around my local suburban area, often through rear access roads and alleys which offered alternative routes, and were less on the beaten path (or pavement to be more accurate!)  These are a few examples.  Many were taken as I took the children to and from school, aided by the slowness of toddler-walking and pushchair pushing, which is very helpful in encouraging observation!

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan jamartlondon.com

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

Looking intently at all those surfaces is something which certainly has influenced my approach to painting.  I think texture is very important in painting, and even more so at this current time, when we are so accustomed to smooth device screens, which we view so many images on.   Light, colour and image viewed on a screen is a completely different experience to having light bounce off textured surfaces.  I know that goes without saying, and I still find the smooth surface of a printed digital image pleasing, but I do think it is sad sometimes that our eyes are drawn to a screen more than they are to the effects of light bouncing around all over the place!

 

Frost From the Heavens

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

Needless to say, you cannot see this painting at all well on the screen…It has tiny glass beads which reflect light very decisively!

 

Virgin Birth?  Or Not Virgin Birth? And Does it Matter Anyway?

Some theological wanderings!

Read this with interest:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/dec/24/story-virgin-birth-christianity-mary-sex-femininity

Christmas is finished with for another year…Decorations put away, lots of rubbish thrown out, and more things to fill the space, which in our house, isn’t much space at all!  As I was ill with some kind of flu bug in the run up to Christmas, I had plenty of time lying in bed unable to do much, and resorted to some theological wanderings, which I do enjoy. On the topic of the virgin birth.  It bugged me last year… this matter of the virgin birth….  A question popped into my mind regarding did it matter?  I thought about it a year ago and left it, but during the run up to this most recent Christmas it popped into my mind again, so I gave it some attention.

Now, firstly, I have been a Christian since the age of 18…That’s a long time.  And in time, a lot of things change. For example,  I was brought up, in my early Christian walk, with the penal substitution theory of atonement.  Urgh?  Here’s a short quote from Wiki:

Penal substitution (sometimes, esp. in older writings, called forensic theory)[1][2] is a theory of the atonement within Christian theology, developed with the Reformed tradition.[1][2][3][4][5] It argues that Christ, by his own sacrificial choice, was punished (penalised) in the place of sinners (substitution), thus satisfying the demands of justice so God can justly forgive the sins. It is thus a specific understanding of substitutionary atonement, where the substitutionary nature of Jesus‘ death is understood in the sense of a substitutionary punishment.

Yes,  and then, many years later, when I thought more deeply about it, and got to know the character of our marvellous Creator God a little bit better, (as much as I was able, in my limited capacity!) and got to sort out a little bit more of my own internal mess, I realised that there were problems for me with this stance, and the biggest problem being that this theory didn’t fit in with my understanding of God as being a God of love, mercy, justice and compassion.  So quite a few of my ideas changed, as did my approach to the Old Testament books of the Bible, with the character of God they tended to create in the imagination.  I changed my approach and started to see that the image of God shown there was indeed the image of God perceived by the people at that time…BEFORE CHRIST.  Christ being the full revelation of the character of God puts a whole different light on things.  What a relief, because the image of God I was getting from the old Testament, even with dollops of mercy and patience and even a bit of femininity thrown in here and there,  was violent, schizophrenic, and predominantly masculine.

I am not quite sure what relationship this has to my rethinking on the virgin birth,  but I guess it served as an invitation to be willing to think over once again certain aspects of faith and belief which I had taken for granted, on face value, in the past, without allowing myself to think them through again. Lots of researching, while very ill in bed with flu before Christmas, led me to the point where I have no issues with believing that the Lord Jesus Christ was conceived naturally in the usual way, and also, conceived of the Holy Spirit.  One need not be exclusive of the other, and natural ways don’t suddenly erase the holiness in life in my opinion.  It doesn’t make Jesus Christ less a member of the Trinity.

I am a firm believer in the truth of God as three in One, Father (also “Mother” is helpful for many, for the term “Father” is used as a matter of following Christ’s terminology, which was what he himself was brought up with), Holy Spirit, and Son.   It doesn’t make the significance of Jesus any less, or make God less God, or anything like that at all.  Surprisingly, I have found in my own experience, the alteration in my belief has made Christ even more significant to me. I have been blessed by this change of understanding.  My relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ has altered in a very good way. God did not abhor the flesh in any sense in the incarnation. The womb of my life is thoroughly human, but still Christ resides in it. I am not unclean to my Creator, his Holy Spirit resides in me.  (Lot’s of work to do there, but still, God is faithful!)

I think that previously I had kind of placed Christ in a  superior position to me with respect to his humanity.   I guess it may have sprung from the idea that he wasn’t quite human in the way that I am.  What with being God.  (It is hard to comprehend, well, impossible, that Christ could be fully God and fully human.  It is, as many things, a matter of faith and choice.)  However, believing that the Lord Jesus Christ is, and was, fully human and fully man, hasn’t changed for me. Even with a change of mind about the virgin birth.  His position in the Trinity hasn’t changed.  When asked by Christ “Who do you say I am?”  My answer will always be “You are the Son of God”.  Christ is part of God’s wonderful plan to BE IN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP WITH US.  But something has changed for me.

I don’t believe that the Lord Jesus Christ was just a prophet, a teacher, or someone particularly gifted and enlightened.  I do believe that he is exactly who he said he is.  But his humanity has changed for me.  Well, this started a way back for me, a few years ago,  when I understood that he understood both doubt and fear. Fully.   That God, my Creator understood MY doubt and fear. Even at the point of it being completely overwhelming. Completely. That it wasn’t a sin to feel they way I did.  Just part of being human. But still something which God understood. Really understood.  But still, even in and through his complete humanity, Christ chose to believe God.  He did not curse God. He held onto the love of God, though all suffering.  In and through it. Yet he knew the experience of FEELING forsaken. Though he was not forsaken, he wasn’t somehow immune to the full human experience of life and death.     That was a liberating realisation!  I think I used to think it was easier for him because he wasn’t quite the same as me in his humanity.

Side line: Maybe the link between the “penal substitution” idea and the “virgin birth” idea, and the idea of Christ being “sinless” (in the sense this is taken at face value by many folk) is the basic concept that Jesus Christ had to be a “perfect” sacrifice, to take the perceived punishment for us?  Yes, there are references in Hebrews for this, but this was a very specific context.  (By the way, to those not into this theological wandering, this may seem a waste of time, but I am re-thinking over layers of assumptions, many of which have been presented to me in the past as being the truth, with no further thinking or questioning to be encouraged!)

But to now… As I slide down the slippery slope, maybe?

Reading the article on the birth of Christ got me thinking about what isn’t recorded in the New Testament.  (PS  I don’t personally believe the collection of books we call the Bible is inerrant…that doesn’t mean I don’t believe it’s not a crucial part of a Christian’s life, or that it isn’t inspired by the Holy Spirit!)  The different gospel writers had their own angles and own approach, and brought a different flavour and emphasis to their narratives,  which all provide a vital perspective and record of the life of Christ.  But while there is a lot that they do write about, there is a lot which is not included as well. Not everything could be written down!  It could not be a perfect account (if perfect means  complete), because it has limitations, as every written record has.  (And the limitations of such as I, in reading it!).  So I got thinking about the parts of Jesus Christ’s life which we don’t know anything about, because the New Testament doesn’t say much about them.  I began to wonder if Jesus was normal?  Was he a normal boy? A normal teenager? What was he like? It seemed silly I had never thought about this before.  To start to think about the Son of God needing to grow, develop, evolve, into the person that he was.  To start to imagine that he would be subject to all the usual psychological and emotional, as well as physical developmental stages.  I had never done this before. Don’t know why!

I had put him in a separate category to myself.  Human but not really human. And his holiness, and fully righteous, mature and Godly character, which is communicated so well and so beautifully expressed within his humanity through the images we get from reading the accounts of him in the New Testament… Was this how he ALWAYS was, right from the point of birth?  Years back, if someone had asked if Jesus Christ was “sinless” for the entirety of his life I would have said “Yes”.  Not sure why.  Must have just picked it up from the Christian cultures I inhibited!  I wouldn’t have even thought about it.  Indeed, many people feel the question a foolish and pointless one.  Maybe even irrelevant.  But nowadays, not thinking about it isn’t an option for me.  Thinking about things in a questioning and analytical way isn’t opposite to faith.  It can open doors into a great depth, and things can be thought about  with always an openness for change, held along with the thinking and the believing!  Plus, when you have flu and all you can do  is look on your tablet, it gives you something to put your mind to!

So I have a slightly different understanding of the Lord Jesus Christ during his time on earth now.  I am not going to go into all the reading, thoughts and theories I read.  It’s enough to say, I did some research, and found a way through it suitable for myself.   There is room for him to experience sinfulness for some of his life.  Why not?  Would this make him somehow less who he said he was?  That he needed to grow and evolve in obedience and perfect submission to God?  That he was not fully enlightened, perfect in holiness, for the entirety of his life, but just a portion of it?  Does being perfect ( whole, complete,  fully obedient, attuned, enlightened, submitted to God, letting God define your very being) for a few years of a human life make it any less amazing, divine, significant, or noteworthy?  Does it make the achievement of Christ’s way, the path he honed out, the extent of how God was revealed in him, and the work of the cross and the resurrection, any less?  Some would hold the opinion that it does diminish Christ to perceive things in the way I do now, I imagine.

But for me it doesn’t. It makes Christ’s achievement all the more inspiring to me, and gives me strength.   I don’t see a conflict in the idea of evolution, and the way that  things are evolving and developing  and the will and purposes of a Creator God. Or of divine things happening through natural human means.  Or of God’s ways revealed in natural and supernatural events.  Sometimes happening at the same time.  Sometimes overlapping.  Meeting.  God in all things, and the eyes to see and heart to believe, is an important principle for me in the way I live my life.  So not embracing the idea of the virgin birth isn’t a case of me not believing it would be possible. Oh no, I don’t have any issues with the fact that our Creator can do what he-she wants.  My understanding is that Christ put his deity aside, and was fully mortal. That all that is hard for me about life was also  hard for him.  For me, the idea of him being conceived naturally (as well as divinely) makes more sense and actually feels more profound and amazing.  No natural process shunned, but integrated divinely.

This is the difference for me in my present understanding and approach.  Christ was fully human. And also (at a point in his life) fully God.  That full measure of the Holy Spirit at his baptism, marked the beginning of his work and his full identity.  It is amazing that God himself understands humanity in a way that would otherwise not be possible without Christ. From a place of complete powerlessness and vulnerability, weakness and fragility.   God is WITH us, in and through Christ, in a way which can be experienced  in a wonderfully liberating and powerful way.   In placing our faith in Christ, as who he is, as the full revelation of God, placed both in history and time and beyond it, it is the case that a whole new way of relating to our Creator opens up.  This kind of makes arguments about a virgin birth, or not, feel a bit trivial I guess.  But I am not here to argue theology, just to share my current perspective.

What matters is who God is.  The Trinity is always going to be well beyond any human comprehension.  So that’s the biggest step of faith I guess.  In the end, we are left with Christ’s question “Who do you say I am?”.  The question and the answer are going to resonate  slightly differently for every person, because we are all unique and God knows each of us entirely.   Some will say Jesus Christ is God, others won’t.  What Christ means for different people is variable, because what the character of God is understood to be, will vary from person to person.  What Christ said about himself will be taken in many different ways.  For myself, as a Christian (a follower of Christ) I find in Christ a way which opens up the love of God to me in a life changing way.  The way we perceive God’s character (if we have a belief in God)  is vastly affected by our own developmental experiences.  Part of my journey so far has been casting off a very negative view of God, and letting the love and consolation of God flow into those places which previously only held desolation. Christ offers me a route into experiencing and relating to God in a way which has proven itself to me, through experience, to be life giving, life enhancing, liberating and revolutionary in many respects.

To entertain this newer idea of the Lord Jesus Christ has been helpful to me. To think that Christ could experience sin is a good thing, because he knows the feelings of guilt and shame which are part of being a human too. I see no need to assume that Jesus Christ was a really disobedient child, wildly rebellious, and rather immoral before he took on his mission.  It would make a good film drama, but not a lot of sense.   It sounds from what is in the New Testament that he was gifted and intelligent, and I do think there would be a serious inclination towards the ways of God from a young age, which would make him a pretty “good” boy, I should think in terms of morality and social behaviours and actions.  I think he needed to apply himself very diligently to learning and growing in the ways of God.  I find it very conceivable that from his baptism onward, in the later stages of his mature life and the time of his ministry, he could later be accurately described later by New Testament writers as being “sinless” and “perfect”.  What these words actually mean in the context they are used in probably quite interesting, and  Jewish and Greek scholars would have a much better grasp of things than I can have.  If “sinless” means “spot on”, and right on the mark, then I am very content to settle for that. A man of total and complete integrity, as I believe Christ was/is, is someone to be believed.

I think the character of Christ would speak, and still does speak, for itself.  My personal issues with Christ being thought of as completely sinless, I think,  is that the idea, in my thinking, seems to have come from an underlying belief that Christ had to be sinless, because if he was sinful AT ALL he couldn’t do the work he needed to do, in redemption. But now I tend to feel this is not the case. A man fully with God, immersed in the Holy Spirit,  is capable of perfect listening and perfect obedience, to the way that his Creator directs him.  A true servant.  Able to fulfil the word of God completely.

I also think, as I did before all this re thinking,  that  “sin” cannot be thought of as simply what goes on on the outside of our lives.  God knows the heart, and a lot happens inside of ourselves totally unseen by others.  The most morally upright and law abiding person, apparently perfect on the exterior, may have a lot of hardness inside.    It is hardness of heart which turns us away from God. And God is Love.  Choices, sometimes unconscious ones,  become part of our personalities and  sometimes have the potential to close us down to God working in our lives.  For most of the time we are pretty clueless as to what is going on in there!  I think of Jesus Christ as having a person hood which, in full maturity, continually said “Yes” to God.  A man with a truly repentant heart, constantly turning, constantly choosing, even though extremely hard…to the point of death on a cross.   I am certainly thinking that, rather then focusing on whether Christ ever sinned or not,  it may be wiser for me to ask what the heart of Christ was like, and take that as the point for focus.  And simply ask Christ to teach me the way he walked.

The heart of Christ. It must have been a thoroughly repentant heart, in the greatest and truest sense of the word. Constantly turning, softening, changing, learning.  Always opening up to God the Father. To change this beautifully repentant heart simply into a mind that never entertained an wrong thought for a second doesn’t seem necessary.  And I have to ask myself, “How can a person be fully human, without  a sinful nature, even if “wrong” (ie faulty) thoughts are never translated into action?”  This idea doesn’t mean that it wasn’t possible that Christ WAS completely sinless by the way,  if by sinless we mean in terms of actions, for a significant portion of his life.  Righteous is not the same as sinless, but one who acts correctly in all respects.  But surely the ability to bear the tension we all feel between what is good and evil and what is right and wrong in life, is the very place where we would both want, and need to meet our Creator? Where we would need to find him there, with us, and to experience the work of Christ, in that place in our lives?

I think I have had some old misconceptions nagging at the back of my mind, which I am chewing over, underneath this all.   I have confused “sinless” with blameless, for a start.  And for some of my Christian walk, in the early years,  I did think that God was expecting me to be sinless.  (Well, easy not to  manage that one!!! Lol).  Must have been that part of me that really didn’t believe I was acceptable to God, unless I was absolutely perfect, and caused no trouble at all!  That’s a cruel load to carry.   Ideally we should not sin, (I mean in actions) of course, but I don’t think avoiding sin should be the focus of the Christian walk.  We are called to be blameless – living above reproach and not creating stumbling blocks that turn others away from Christ.  Holiness is not merely the absence of sin, but having the nature of God and living according to that.  It’s a subtle difference in perspective, but an important one.

Christ summed up  what mattered:

(Gospel of Luke)
“And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou? And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself. And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.”

— Luke 10:25-28

I am certain that Christ loved completely,  in a way which blew people away when they encountered him, and to an extent to which his set apart-ness, his holiness, was clear to all he encountered.  That cannot of made life easy for him.  And I don’t quite know why I have never thought about the assumption of complete sinless-ness for Christ before. Or even if it matters or not.  I feel a bit of a twit really, for imagining a non-developmental pattern for the life of Christ.  Whatever place he inhibited throughout his ministry, I never cast my mind to the time before that. Oh well, questions asked now! Things do change as time moves on.

Was Jesus Christ always successful, did he never fail, never make a mistake? How did he learn, or did he not need to learn? In his entire life, from toddler-dom  onwards?  H’mm.  Really? We all have to start somewhere surely?  Is a plant less a plant because it starts as a seed? Does the unfolding nature of God within Christ, evolving and developing within the boundaries of time, make it any less holy?  Any less sacred?  Is there room for normal human development in the person of Christ?  Common sense would say “of course”! And Christ grew, to full stature!  That is amazing!  Fully who he was!  And what is more, he took on a task ordained for him, and one far more difficult than any  other living being could imagine.   What was hard for us, would be even harder for him I think.  Because the forces of darkness and evil would fight all the harder against the divine revelation of the Love of God. God incarnate.  How aggravating Jesus Christ would have been to many people.  How wonderful at the same time for others, if they received him with open hearts when he was walking the earth.   The “virgin” or “not virgin birth” will divide opinions for certain, but fades into insignificance in the light of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ to my thinking. The more central point for a Christian to believe is the resurrection and the reality of Christ’s life, death and resurrection, and to believe, and continue to believe, what the Holy Spirit testifies about Christ.

Well, all this theological thinking is part of the background to the poem I wrote before Christmas, which I hope you enjoy. As for differences of opinion, they are part of the wonder of being on this earth, and I certainly don’t intend any offence to anyone.  I just share my own thoughts and ideas.  Just that.

Just before Christmas I wrote the poem below.  Bit clumsy and not my best, but it was challenging at least!

………………………..

I’ve written a Christmas poem…it’s pretty much all I can do, but it was fun!

Would Jesus take my toys? Mummy?

A mother and her child talk, while tidying the child’s room.

Would Jesus take my toys? Mummy?
If he came to play?
Because frankincense and myrrh
Are not much good for you
when you are six!

Would he want, what I have got?
And would he want to play?
Or would he simply look to God
Hold his hands in prayer, to pray?

I think you know the answer, sweet,
You know what I will say!
Jesus isn’t perfect, so
He might take them,
and play!

But when he sees your sorrow, sweet,
Or sadness he has brought,
Well, he’ll quicker, faster, sooner,
than other friends
Open up his truer heart.

You’re very good friends…you’ll work it out!
I can help you, if need be.
Don’t worry about Jesus coming to play
There’s room enough
for BOTH of you!
(And hopefully, IF we do this task…
Maybe even me!)

As she picks up the toys…

Your little play friend isn’t perfect
(Which is just as well for you!)
You kind of jumble on together
In this messy life, don’t you?

BOTH of you are perfect, well…
So, a mother’s heart would say
But as for him, he has a task
Beyond ALL comprehension.
(I dare not even ask his mother!)

She puts a toy in her child’s hand.

We don’t know what his life will be
Anymore than we know yours…
He still needs to learn the ways of God
While doing household chores.
He needs to trip and stumble
And maybe even hit his head?
He’s just a little boy, you know,
Whatever people said.

She pauses for a moment.

But there is something…
A depth of beautiful insight…
It’s like the brightest star…

The child throws the toy into a box.

Oh mummy! Do you love Jesus more?
And wish that I was just like him?
Because he is so very good
And hardly ever sins?
If you could have a child like him
Why would you want to keep one like me?
I groan when doing household chores
And I’m often quite naughty!

But mummy looked,
And mummy smiled,
And mummy took
The little child
Then in, when in her arms, she said,

THE KINGDOM OF GOD BELONGS TO YOU!

Your friend and you, are one of a kind,
Just hold his hand,
You’ll understand,
And when his work is done, there will be no
Comparison
IN YOUR HEART
He’s only just begun!

His humility will touch you,
His obedience, show the way,
His acceptance, open up your heart,
To the fullest light of day.

And now, my little sweet heart,
Let’s just PUT THOSE TOYS AWAY!

They laugh.

 

I’m glad I invested the time into that. Yet I need to focus on the following:

Gospel of Matthew:

“Then one of them, which was a lawyer, asked him a question, tempting him, and saying, Master, which is the great commandment in the law? Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.”

— Matthew 22:35-40

and:
Gospel of Mark

“And one of the scribes came, and having heard them reasoning together, and perceiving that he had answered them well, asked him, Which is the first commandment of all? And Jesus answered him, The first of all the commandments is, Hear, O Israel; The Lord our God is one Lord: And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment. And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these.”

— Mark 12:28-31

Gospel of Luke

“And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? He said unto him, What is written in the law? how readest thou? And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself. And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: this do, and thou shalt live.”

— Luke 10:25-28

 

I feel all the better for addressing my questions, and not just ignoring them.  Minds are handy, hearts are vital!  The bottom line is, that unless I was there, and asked the Lord Jesus Christ personally if felt himself he was completely sinless, and if so, what exactly that meant,  (or if he even wanted to be perceived that way!) I cannot speak with any authority. It is amazing how certain many people are about this idea though,  and it matters a great deal to them.   I fall on the “Of course he wasn’t and he never claimed he was” side of the matter.  Some people say Jesus Christ never sinned, and others say that he did.

I guess all this thinking has at least settled in my own perspective where I stand. It’s taken some chewing over though! I tend to feel the Lord Jesus Christ was clearly aware of his own humanity and his own human nature, and was someone who was very aware of how we deceive ourselves by judging things externally, while not fully acknowledging the mind and the subconscious.   “Sin” as in action,  is clearly a different realm to an understanding of the errant quality of human nature, and the distortions and perceptions of our minds.  I am ignorant of  the Jewish context, understanding and traditions, which inform the text, and of the culture at that time.  I only offer up my own musings as part of my own faith journey.  I can embrace the idea of Christ doing no wrong and “committing no sin” for the period of his active ministry.  I cannot stretch that to a  totally sinless life from A to B with a strange, detached humanity, which wasn’t rooted deep within his very being in the way that mine is.  To be fully human and fully God, I see a Saviour who possesses all of that which marks my own human existence.  Including personal growth and development. And yet, manages to be fully obedient in all respects when anointed in his mission.  This may not be simply equated with being “sinless”.  It is possibly (?) easier to pass over a sinless Christ, in terms of actually applying his work, and way, to our own lives?

For me personally, it’s been fruitful to throw off the idea of perfect Jesus, in the way I had previously understood perfection. For someone else, this might be an unhelpful and disturbing way of approaching Christ.   So apologies to you if this does offend. It’s not meant to.  I don’t share it by way of feeling I want to convince anyone either way, but just because this is where I am right now.  I won’t be entering into any debate or argument about it, because I have not interest in putting my energy that way. As I get older I tend to take the approach that “I cannot know anything for sure” but can only know what feels true, and can only choose to believe what feels right.  It’s wandering in the dark for me, and yet, my personal experience of Christ in my life has brought me where I am, and of that, I need not doubt, because this is the life I have lived and still live.  My story unfolds on the very foundations of my faith, which is rooted in Christ, my God, and all I can do is pray that I listen to the Spirit, and be as open as I can, to any way I might grow in Christ, who is Love, and God incarnate.

Sometimes this may mean chewing over things I have thought before in a new way, and sometimes I will change my mind.  It is the fully human aspect of Christ which I find so inspiring right now.  What he did with his humanity, and his human nature, which is something we share and relate to.   For the character of Christ is something I know just a little of, and that itself surpasses all other.  I just need to immerse myself more in that!

For those of you who read this Journal more for the visual art content, my writing has always been part of my creative output, and while not seeming relevant to what I do visually, it’s another dimension of my work which grabs me from time to time.  It’s so dark and cold in the studio tent right now, that January has mostly been spent with writing, domestic tasks, and admin!  Come to think of it,  I should possibly christen  the Winter as  as my writing season, because it’s not the first time I have turned to words rather than images at this time of year!

And for those of you who are more proficient in theological wandering than I am, be merciful!  And for those of you who find what I write offends your faith in some way, then even be perfect as your Father in heaven is perfect, and know that God loves both the “right” and the “wrong”!   There was a time, a long time back, when I would have thought that if I didn’t believe Christ was sinless, and I didn’t believe in the virgin birth,  I couldn’t possibly call myself a Christian.  Obviously I don’t hold that view now, but I fully appreciate that some will, and mutual respect is due, whatever stance one holds.

 

Jennifer Meehan/Jenny Meehan No Problem/Moving On abstract art print by Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com bright bold motivational art for physiotherapy experience personal mobility challenges, jenny meehan,now at SWLEOC south west london elective orthopaedic centre

No Problem/Moving On sign of the times series jenny meehan (jennifer meehan) now at SWLEOC

 

No Problem/Moving On – Geometric Colour Abstract Print by Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

One of the “Signs of the Times Series” by Jenny Meehan

This artwork design conveys a positive attitude, and is the fruit of my interest in positive psychology and personal mobility challenges. A “can do” attitude in the face of resistance and difficulties is the only way to move forward. The design has something of my own experience of exercising in a gym with motion suggested through various formal elements, of varying speeds and a sense of progression.

Do you like this print?  You can buy it easily and safely through Redbubble.com, just follow the link:

https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/works/20507601-no-problem-moving-on-geometric-colour-abstract-print-by-jenny-meehan-jamartlondon-com?asc=u

Briefly…On the knee

Well, I will save the big post for the one year mark and put that on “The very patient knee replacement story by Jenny Meehan” but things are great!  I love being mobile and I don’t miss my sticks!

Tidying up old research, I found this reading:

https://healthskills.wordpress.com/2011/03/23/its-there-and-im-stuck-with-it-chronic-knee-pain-after-knee-joint-replacement/

It’s an excellent read about pain after TKR.   I am very happy with my results, at 11 months now.  Yes, you do get a bit of an ache sometimes, but it is NOTHING compared to the experience of frequent constant pain before TKR.  And when you are able to live your life, pain in itself is no bother at all. Before my knee replacement I wasn’t able to live my life as I needed to.

It’s a good article, well worth reading.  I think anxiety is a major issue after a TKR for a lot of people.  There is such a vast variety of types of pain you get after the surgery as the soft tissues and bones are healing!  It’s very easy to focus on each one and worry.  I found it best to take a “I will wait a couple of days and see what it is like then” approach.  By the time a couple of days had past, there had been some change, and even if that change was a different pain,  the point was the initial worry had past!  I think it helped me that I did not have an expectation that I would be pain free necessarily, but that I would be mobile and have less pain.  Actually, my post surgery experience has exceeded my expectations, and I feel normal again in a way I did not expect.   I do worry a bit that I may wear it out, because I am whizzing around, but the reality is, even if this only lasted five years, I would consider it worth it.  Having said that, I do expect longer!!!   Keeping the weight off, and respecting the knee is the way forward I think.  I won’t be running or jumping up and down, unless I am in water!

Interesting Read

I found this blog interesting, as I was just sorting out some old emails and found I had been approached by the “It’s Liquid” venture.  I just chuck that kind of thing in the virtual bin, but it is often tempting to consider such invitations.

http://badartbad.blogspot.co.uk/2007/12/luca-curci-and-artexpo-scam.html

I don’t have very much disposable income to throw away, so it makes this kind of decision easy for me.

It’s best for artists to create their own exhibition opportunities if possible IMO.

 

About Jenny Meehan’s Paintings

This process led painting…romantic, expressionistic, abstract and lyrical, is simply the result of my own contemplative practice, which I work through in many ways. Let by instinct and intuition, inspired by my own life experiences, and several much loved artists, including Klee, Hitchens, Claude Venard, Matisse and Kandinsky, it provides the ground for the viewer’s own interpretations and responses, and will be whatever you want it to be. My own titles reflect my own interpretation/,sense of meaning, but the beauty and openness of non objective painting allows you a place in the process exclusively yours!

The image doesn’t show the extent to which texture, and various surface finishes are used in the painting, for example, I use tiny glass beads for their effects on light hitting the surface of the painting. Maybe they could be seen as a dance of light and colour? Certainly, as the light in the day changes, the appearance of the painting changes considerably, with different parts being emphasised and other parts sinking into the background. This painting is one which responds, and I hope you get pleasure from viewing it! See more at http://www.jamartlondon.com

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION

Copyright in all images by Jenny Meehan is held by the artist.
Permission must be sought in advance if you wish to use images by Jenny Meehan. In the first instance, please contact Jenny Meehan. Copyright for all works of art by Jenny Meehan is managed by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) in the UK.

Francis Davison at The Redfern Gallery

What a great show this was!

I took many visual meanderings across the surfaces of the many collages on show.

As I plan to bring my own work onto a larger format, I found the size of the work on show very pleasing…Large enough to be easy to enter into, but not so large as to be impractical.  Though wall space nowadays is a problem for many people…Unless you have plenty of walls, what do you do with this superb, intimate yet impressive work?  Both bold and delicate, strong and fragile.  I like this.   But I lack the wall and floor I need to work at this scale at the present time.

Just one wall.  Just one floor.  And I will be happy.

I did resort to painting on the side of our house a few years back…

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reservedjenny meehan spontaneous side of the house painting

jenny meehan spontaneous side of the house painting © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

You cannot see this anymore because I have erected my studio tent in front of it.  It was painted with rollers and I called it “Spontaneous Side of the House Painting”.  It was indeed completely spontaneous, with no planning, just a sudden urge with a roller in hand and some left over silicate mineral paint!

But to today!

I am currently  experimenting with different materials to use in my own paintings.  I had started to introduce collaged elements a while ago, so it seems a natural progression to maybe use the process of sticking things on…

Indeed, with the need to work a bit larger, to have areas I can just stick on will be useful…

Especially as I plan to experiment with both planned and unplanned paintings.  It will be useful to be able to move large areas around if I need to.

And I like sticky things… Mmmm.

Brought rather a lot of tape recently.

Maybe something to do with wrapping up presents?  But not sure I need hazard tape to do that…?? Or non slip gripper tape, or double sided tape or…  Off on another meander…!

I would combine collage with paint I should think.  However, before that, loads of experimentation with surfaces needs to happen.

And what a pleasure that is!

Back to Francis Davison…

Looking around The Redfern Gallery at Francis Davison’s collages at the Private View was not enough for me, and besides, people, lovely as they are, get in the way!  So I re visited and took in a little bit more deeply what was happening there for me.  Seeing the work generated all kinds of new ideas in my mind, really, so many I needed to take notes.  The art now for me will be restraint…To hold back yet give all, at the very same time.

https://www.redfern-gallery.com/artists/47-francis-davison/

I also enjoyed the Jasper Johns exhibition at the Royal Academy.

Here is a quote from the Royal Academy website:

“One hopes for something resembling truth, some sense of life, even of grace, to flicker, at least, in the work.” Jasper Johns, 2006.

Widely known for his iconic images of flags, targets, numbers, maps and light bulbs, Jasper Johns has occupied a central position in American art since his first solo exhibition in New York in 1958. His treatment of iconography and appropriation of objects, symbols and words makes the familiar unfamiliar, achieving this through the distinctive, complex textures of his works. Through his ground-breaking paintings and sculptures, Johns established a decisive new direction in an art world that had previously been dominated by Abstract Expressionism.

Jasper Johns: ‘Something Resembling Truth’ is the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s work to be held in the UK in 40 years. Comprising over 150 paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints, it reveals the continuities and changes that have occurred over the past six decades and the curiosity and experimentation that Johns continues to apply to his current practice. During the 1960s Johns added an array of household and studio objects and imprints and casts of the human figure. The works of the 1970s are dominated by an abstract pattern, referred to as “crosshatchings”. During the 1980s and 1990s Johns introduced a variety of images that engaged with the ambiguities of perception and ongoing themes involving memory, sexuality, and the contemplation of mortality. From this time, Johns increasingly incorporated tracings and details of works by artists including Matthias Grünewald, Pablo Picasso and Edvard Munch. By the early 2000s Johns had embarked on the pared-down and more conceptual Catenary series which, along with other recent works such as 5 Postcards, 2013 and Regrets, 2013, shows the rich productivity and vitality of this late phase of his career.

The exhibition brings together artworks that rarely travel from international private and public collections and new works by the artist. It follows in the Royal Academy’s tradition of celebrating its Royal Academicians, continuing the strand of programming that has showcased some of the most significant living artists including Anish Kapoor, David Hockney, Anselm Kiefer and Ai Weiwei.

Working in close collaboration with the artist, the exhibition is co-curated by Dr Roberta Bernstein and Edith Devaney.

There were a few pieces which I liked, but lots I didn’t feel drawn to.  Not the same kind of experience as the Francis Davison exhibition for me, however I am still very glad I went.  I have a kind  friend who is a friend of the Royal Academy, and so I went with her and could get in free of charge.  Target, 1960 and Jasper Johns’ 1962 painting known as Fool’s House stood out for me, and I liked much of the monochrome paintings and prints.  I think I may experiment more with black and white myself, as it will enable me to focus on the mark making without the need to perform the balancing act of colour!

Here is a short video on Jasper Johns:

https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/article/jasper-johns-video-60-seconds

Christmas is coming!

If you want a religious, traditonal Advent Calendar, watch out, as they seem to be very expensive!

It seems you pay more for wanting the Nativity story depicted on your little cardboard feast of doors to open.  If you choose an advent calendar with nothing to do with Christ, it will be much cheaper!  This is sad.

I’m not keen on the run up to Christmas…It’s so dark, I don’t like all the emphasis on material goods, and I always feel I should be in hibernation.   I like Christmas Day itself, quite like Christmas Eve, love Boxing Day and I feel increasingly Christmassy AFTER Christmas!   As a committed Christian I do celebrate the coming of Christ into the world, and I do enjoy that part of things, naturally.  But the rest is burdensome.    Some glimmers of pleasure here and there, but not much!   However, I will wish all who read this a Happy Christmas, with all my heart, because I am not totally Humbug!   I hope you have got some pleasure from dipping into my ramblings and seeing some of my art working, which I am grateful to be able to share with you.

So “Happy Christmas!”

jenny meehan, jennifer meehan,all saints church angels project design angel abstraction holy holy holy image jenny meehan

all saints church angels project design angel abstraction holy holy holy image jenny meehan

And “Holy, Holy, Holy” is the most Christmassy piece of work I have done, so here it is as my Christmas Greeting to you!

 

Edward Muybridge

Kingston Museum are planning an exhibition of work via an open submission process.  It is sometime next year. As usual I have enjoyed taking many photographs of the work I am working on! That itself becomes a process of experimenting with composition.

 

 

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

 

minds eye edward muybridge kingston musuem exhibition jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

 

I make a habit of examining my work in detail with the aid of a camera.  Something about a viewfinder helps me to look carefully!

I did a lot of reading around,  and in the end, couldn’t get away from the fact that the man was a murderer and if he wasn’t a man, he probably wouldn’t have got away with it!  I ended up feeling more a sense of tragedy for his wife and child.  There were all kinds of routes I could have gone down, including the interesting way in which it was fine for men to look at the female body for the purpose of art, (and supposedly science) but it was not OK for women to draw from life until years later. But in the end, it was the idea of playing around with what might be triggered in Edward Muybridge’s mind as he went about his work which I found fascinated me, hence “The Mind’s Eye”.

With this collaged painting comes the poem I wrote which is part of it:

The Mind’s Eye

What thoughts and memories
unsettled
might dwell in the unconscious mind of the artist
as he works?
Projected onto models…
Figures of his own past
laughing
moving
strangers
touching new pain in the mind’s eye?
Shot images…
they infiltrate the heart
yet, even the most animated
leave it
still
so solitary.

Jenny Meehan 2017

 

This work has been submitted but I don’t yet know if it will be accepted or not.  But whatever happens, I am sure the exhibition will be very good and I look forward to seeing it.  I don’t think I have dates for the exhibition, just that submissions need to be in by sometime in February next year!  But will keep you posted!

Positive Psychology

Back again to my interest in positive psychology.  Bit about it here, quoted from Wikipedia:

Seligman and Csikszentmihalyi define positive psychology as “the scientific study of positive human functioning and flourishing on multiple levels that include the biological, personal, relational, institutional, cultural, and global dimensions of life.”[8] L.M. Keyes and Shane Lopez illustrate the four typologies of mental health functioning: flourishing, struggling, floundering and languishing. However, complete mental health is a combination of high emotional well-being, high psychological well-being, and high social well-being, along with low mental illness.[9]

Very small snippet, but referencing for further reading.

I added this work to my Redbubble.com facility a while back.  It is another of the  “Signs of the Times” series.  I have revisited the work in the light of recent experiences of restricted mobility due to osteoarthritis/knee replacement surgery, the experience of physiotherapy, and working my way forward into increased mobility.  This theme of motion and mobility, and freedom of movement,  has been a theme for a while.  I sense some future work, both in the graphic/geometric and expressionistic/lyrical painting realms, may be ripening itself for release over the next year or so.  I have become quite passionate, as a result of my experience of pain and disability, to express the liberation I feel now I have freedom of movement.  I would like to use physical actions and movements in my painting more, and paint on a larger scale.

 

"Slow Motion We Get On" Digital Print by Jenny Meehan for sale to buy at Chessington Court Cafe and Garden Centre This ink-jet print is laminated and mounted on Foamex. It can be purchased with or without a frame. Bold, bright, geometric composition from British female fine and applied artist Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

“Slow Motion/We Get On” Digital Print by Jenny Meehan This ink-jet print is laminated and mounted on Foamex. It can be purchased with or without a frame. Bold, bright, geometric composition from British female fine and applied artist Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

 

Artist’s Description

Slow Motion/We Get On – Abstract Print Design by Jenny Meehan

Progress is sometimes slow in life, however, a positive attitude can take us a long way forwards. This contemporary abstract design is from the “Signs of the Times” series of art work. Inspired partly by my interest in Positive Psychology and also personal mobility challenges, this design is gently dynamic, with a sense of light inter-playing with darkness. Often we don’t see the “light at the end of the tunnel” but may be aware of nuances of light and dark through each day as it comes.

Jenny Meehan
jamartlondon.com

And the other one, which you saw above I donated to SWLEOC…. Here it is:

 

No Problem/Moving On abstract art print by Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com bright bold motivational art for physiotherapy experience personal mobility challenges, jenny meehan,

No Problem/Moving On sign of the times series jenny meehan

Artist’s Description

No Problem/Moving On – Geometric Colour Abstract Print by Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

One of the “Signs of the Times Series” by Jenny Meehan

This artwork design conveys a positive attitude, and is the fruit of my interest in positive psychology and personal mobility challenges. A “can do” attitude in the face of resistance and difficulties is the only way to move forward. The design has something of my own experience of exercising in a gym with motion suggested through various formal elements, of varying speeds and a sense of progression.

www.jamartlondon.com

 

Osteoarthritis –  The way it comes and runs off with your life

Well,  yes, it is all very positive, the psychology and the art.  But make no mistake, the time before my TKR (total knee replacement) was a very difficult time for me.  There was no doubt at all that the quality of my life diminished!    The worst thing for me was not being able to walk freely and the way it was affecting my painting and artistic practice. It was always  a challenge to balance different aspects of life, but it got even harder. Pain is very wearing.

I have very little pain now, and if I do (If I have really done a HUGE amount) it is very minor and no trouble at all.   In 2016 I found this, which I wrote before writing “The Very Patient Knee Replacement Story by Jenny Meehan”:

“Thoughts for potential artworks are jotted down with a Physiotherapy theme. “Being stretched to the Limit” is an attractive title.  Rather amazingly, the long awaited appointment with a surgeon is at eleven o’ clock in the morning.  Bearing in mind the phrase “the eleventh hour” this holds some  resonance.  For “the latest possible moment” is how it feels to me, even though the appointment has come quite quickly since I have been referred.  The last 16 months have been so restricting, frustrating, and basically disabling.  It’s been a long journey…not over yet. I will probably need to write about it here in the future, particularly in relation to my thoughts about age and access to knee replacement.”

How funny, and little did I know I would get so carried away with writing!

I think I need to write a booklet or some other kind of more concise text about knee replacement next!

Life is just great now though!  Movement and rhythm seem to be two of my most favourite things!  I had a fantastic time at “Drum Dance” which was organised by Kingston Arts in November.  I have even brought myself a little Bongo drum.  Small and cheap but OK for me.  I had such a brilliant time, dancing around for hours on my new knee, I couldn’t quite believe it.  And drumming away!  The best time I have had in ages.  And the next day, no soreness, pain, or any problems with my knee.

I am seriously thinking about incorporating movement into these bigger paintings I plan to do next year.  I need more room!  I need more space!

Dadirri

I found this interesting.  Always very into water.  Just excerpts of it:

Dadirri – A Reflection By Miriam – Rose Ungunmerr- Baumann
NGANGIKURUNGKURR means ‘Deep Water Sounds’. Ngangikurungkurr is the name of
my tribe. The word can be broken up into three parts: Ngangi means word or sound, Kuri
means water, and kurr means deep. So the name of my people means ‘the Deep Water
Sounds’ or ‘Sounds of the Deep’. This talk is about tapping into that deep spring that is
within us.”

“…this quality is called dadirri. It is inner, deep listening and quiet, still awareness.
Dadirri recognises the deep spring that is inside us. We call on it and it calls to us. This
is the gift that Australia is thirsting for. It is something like what you call “contemplation”.
When I experience dadirri, I am made whole again. I can sit on the riverbank or walk
through the trees; even if someone close to me has passed away, I can find my peace in
this silent awareness. There is no need of words. A big part of dadirri is listening.”

There is no need to reflect too much and to do a lot of thinking. It is just being aware.
My people are not threatened by silence. They are completely at home in it. They have
lived for thousands of years with Nature’s quietness. My people today, recognise and
experience in this quietness, the great Life-Giving Spirit, the Father of us all. It is easy for
me to experience God’s presence. When I am out hunting, when I am in the bush,
among the trees, on a hill or by a billabong; these are the times when I can simply be in
God’s presence. My people have been so aware of Nature. It is natural that we will feel
close to the Creator.”

She talks also about waiting and how the Aboriginal culture has “taught us to be still and wait”.

We don’t like to hurry. There is nothing more important than what we are attending to.
There is nothing more urgent that we must hurry away for.
We wait on God, too. His time is the right time. We wait for him to make his Word clear
to us. We don’t worry. We know that in time and in the spirit of dadirri (that deep listening
and quiet stillness) his way will be clear.
We are River people. We cannot hurry the river. We have to move with its current and
understand its ways.”

 

Yes, we cannot hurry the river!

Imagined Worlds Exhibition Images

This was an exhibition I took part in towards the end of 2016 and beginning of this year. It was a super project, brilliantly organised and I was very pleased to be part of it!

Here are some images from the “Imagined Worlds” Exhibition curated by Jon England in collaboration with Somerset Art Works.  All Photos: Jon England.

Imagined Worlds – A touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1816. This is a celebration by the Friends of Coleridge supported by Somerset Art Works, working in partnership with the National Trust, CICCIC Taunton, and Art at the Heart, RUH Bath.

My work shown in the third image… Close up reminder:  Title:  Alph, the Sacred River 1

imagined worlds coleridge kubla khan inspired art exhibition somerset imagined worlds exhibition alph the sacred river coleridge kubla khan jenny meehan

imagined worlds exhibition alph the sacred river coleridge kubla khan jenny meehan

And we must have the poem, of course….

Kubla Khan
BY SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE
Or, a vision in a dream. A Fragment.
In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree:
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea.
So twice five miles of fertile ground
With walls and towers were girdled round;
And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.

But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted
Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover!
A savage place! as holy and enchanted
As e’er beneath a waning moon was haunted
By woman wailing for her demon-lover!
And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething,
As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing,
A mighty fountain momently was forced:
Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst
Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail,
Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher’s flail:
And mid these dancing rocks at once and ever
It flung up momently the sacred river.
Five miles meandering with a mazy motion
Through wood and dale the sacred river ran,
Then reached the caverns measureless to man,
And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean;
And ’mid this tumult Kubla heard from far
Ancestral voices prophesying war!
The shadow of the dome of pleasure
Floated midway on the waves;
Where was heard the mingled measure
From the fountain and the caves.
It was a miracle of rare device,
A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice!

A damsel with a dulcimer
In a vision once I saw:
It was an Abyssinian maid
And on her dulcimer she played,
Singing of Mount Abora.
Could I revive within me
Her symphony and song,
To such a deep delight ’twould win me,
That with music loud and long,
I would build that dome in air,
That sunny dome! those caves of ice!
And all who heard should see them there,
And all should cry, Beware! Beware!
His flashing eyes, his floating hair!
Weave a circle round him thrice,
And close your eyes with holy dread
For he on honey-dew hath fed,
And drunk the milk of Paradise.

 

 

Interesting Book: Art and Psychoanalysis by Maria Walsh

Often derided as unscientific and self-indulgent, psychoanalysis has been an invaluable resource for artists, art critics and historians throughout the twentieth century. Art and Psychoanalysis investigates these encounters. The shared relationship to the unconscious, severed from Romantic inspiration by Freud, is traced from the Surrealist engagement with psychoanalytic imagery to the contemporary critic’s use of psychoanalytic concepts as tools to understand how meaning operates. Following the theme of the ‘object’ with its varying materiality, Walsh develops her argument that psychoanalysis, like art, is a cultural discourse about the mind in which the authority of discourse itself can be undermined, provoking ambiguity and uncertainty and destabilising identity. The dynamics of the dream-work, Freud’s ‘familiar unfamiliar’, fetishism, visual mastery, abjection, repetition, and the death drive are explored through detailed analysis of artists ranging from Max Ernst to Louise Bourgeois, including 1980s postmodernists such as Cindy Sherman, the performance art of Marina Abramovic’ and post-minimalist sculpture.

Innovative and disturbing, Art and Psychoanalysis investigates key psychoanalytic concepts to reveal a dynamic relationship between art and psychoanalysis which goes far beyond interpretation. There is no cure for the artist – but art can reconcile us to the traumatic nature of human experience, converting the sadistic impulses of the ego towards domination and war into a masochistic ethics of responsibility and desire.”

I will need to put this on my reading list..  Maybe on my Christmas list!

“understand how meaning operates” 

” psychoanalysis, like art, is a cultural discourse about the mind in which the authority of discourse itself can be undermined, provoking ambiguity and uncertainty and destabilising identity.”… interesting…

There is no cure for the artist – but art can reconcile us to the traumatic nature of human experience, converting the sadistic impulses of the ego towards domination and war into a masochistic ethics of responsibility and desire.”

Mmm, interesting with respect to the sadistic impulses of the ego…  Not so sure on the ethics of responsibility and desire, as don’t quite get why linked with masochistic….   But then, have not read the book yet.  

Introduction
Chapter 1 | Distortion and Disguise: The Dream-Work
Chapter 2 | Uncanny Eruptions
Chapter 3 | Refashioning Fetishism and Masquerade
Chapter 4 | Female Fetishism in the Expanded Field of Narcissism
Chapter 5 | Eye and Gaze: Restoring Body to Vision
Chapter 6 | The Evolution of Abjection
Chapter 7 | Black Narcissus
Chapter 8 | Repetition and the Death Drive
Chapter 9 | Returning to Melanie Klein
Chapter 10 | ‘Real-Making’: A Transitional Phenomenon
Chapter 11 | New Skins for Old
Select Bibliography
Index

Text above is quoted from: http://www.ibtauris.com/Books/The%20arts/The%20arts%20general%20issues/Theory%20of%20art/Art%20and%20Psychoanalysis.aspx?menuitem=%7BE0961D02-3441-46BB-AC01-8728897BEF72%7D

Maria Walsh is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art, Theory at University of the Arts, London.

As well as all this brain stretching stuff… I am very much interested in interpretation…Someone’s personal interpretation matters just as much as any academic theory or analysis.  But it is good to keep my mind working!

 

Mindful Eating

I lost a lot of weight in the last couple of years.  Still working on it though!  I found mindful eating helpful.

Information quoted below is from this website:  https://zenhabits.net/what-is-mindful-eating/

Simply put, my approach to mindful eating is learning to pay attention. Instead of eating mindlessly, putting food into your mouth almost unconsciously, not really tasting the food you’re eating … you notice your thoughts, feelings, and sensations.

You learn to pay attention to:

Why you feel like eating, and what emotions or needs might be triggering the eating.
What you’re eating, and whether it is healthy or not.
The look, smell, taste, feel of the food you’re eating.
How it makes you feel as you taste it, as you digest it, and throughout the day.
How full (or sated) you are before, during and after eating.
Your emotions during and after eating.
Where the food came from, who might have grown it, how much it might have suffered before it was killed, whether it was grown organically, how much it was processed, how much it was fried or overcooked, etc.

This is a skill, a form of meditation really, that you don’t just acquire overnight. It takes practice, and there will be times when you forget to eat mindfully, and there will be starts and stops. But with practice and attention, you can become very good at this.” 

 

“The Benefits of Mindful Eating
The benefits of eating mindfully are amazing, and it’s important to know these benefits as you consider the practice.

I’m going to go over just a handful of the most important benefits, though as you learn the practice I’m sure you’ll find many more. Many of these are from personal experience, but many of them are supported by research (I’ve linked to some of the research when I had the link handy).

My favorite benefits:

You learn to eat when you’re hungry, and stop when you’re sated.
You learn to really taste food, and to enjoy the taste of healthy food.
You slowly start to realize that unhealthy food isn’t as tasty as you thought, nor does it make you feel very good.
As a result of the above three points, you will often lose weight if you’re overweight.
You begin to sort through the emotional issues you have around food and eating. This takes a bit longer, but it’s important.
Social overeating can become less of a problem — you can eat mindfully while socializing, with practice, and not overeat.
You begin to enjoy the eating experience more, and as a result enjoy life more, when you’re more present.
It can become a mindfulness ritual you look forward to.
You learn how food affects your mood and energy throughout the day.
You learn what food best fuels your exercise and work and play.
Again, there are other benefits, but these are some of the most important, in my experience. “

I am rather rushing around at the moment, as I can now do so.  It seems I have a burst of energy I haven’t had for years and I think that now I am mobile and pain free, I am intent on making the most of what I have while I have it.  I don’t think I will ever take walking for granted again!

This looks interesting, on another tangent:

http://www.everypainterpaintshimself.com/about

Contact Jenny Meehan through the contact form on her website:

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742

About Jenny Meehan (Jennifer Meehan) 

Jenny Meehan is an established artist who has been exhibiting for over ten years, mostly in the UK. Notable exhibitions include, most recently being selected for the Imagined Worlds touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ and inclusion in “Building Bridges, the Female Perspective” at Tower Bridge Victorian Engine Rooms in 2016. Jenny has been a keen supporter of various charity art exhibitions over the years including the National Brain Appeals ” A Letter in Mind” at Gallery@oxo, South Bank, London and the “Anatomy for Life” Exhibition for Brighton Sussex University Hospitals Trust in 2015

Selected by a wide range of judges in open submission exhibitions, her work appeals to the aesthetic and emotional discernment of many, and has been displayed in many prestigious galleries. These include the Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, in 2015, as part of their Open Exhibition, and the Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, West Sussex, as part of the Pallant House Gallery/St Wilfrid’s Hospice Open Art Exhibition in 2010.

Jenny Meehan’s work has been included in several academic projects and and publications including “Speaking Out – Women Recovering from the Trauma of Violence” by Nicole Fayard in 2014 and the ongoing “Recovery” Exhibition project – Institute Of Mental Health/City Arts, Nottingham University, also in 2014. While her romantic, lyrical, expressionistic, abstract paintings offer a contemplative space free from cares and concerns, other strands of her practice engage with subjects ranging from violence, trauma recovery, psychoanalysis, and mental health.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

Interesting Television Programme

I have watched the “Basquiat – Rags to Riches” programme recently. Several times.

Here is the text about the programme:

The recent Sotheby’s auction of a Jean-Michel Basquiat Skull painting for over a hundred million dollars has catapulted this Brooklyn-born artist into the top tier of the international art market, joining the ranks of Picasso, de Kooning and Francis Bacon. This film tells Jean-Michel’s story through exclusive interviews with his two sisters Lisane and Jeanine, who have never before agreed to be interviewed for a TV documentary. With striking candour, Basquiat’s art dealers – including Larry Gagosian, Mary Boone and Bruno Bischofberger – as well as his most intimate friends, lovers and fellow artists, expose the cash, the drugs and the pernicious racism which Basquiat confronted on a daily basis. As historical tableaux, visual diaries of defiance or surfaces covered with hidden meanings, Basquiat’s art remains the beating heart of this story” 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b098pd3q

What an interesting programme and it’s opened my eyes up.  Not sure quite what the results will be, but feeling very inspired.  

The exhibition looks good too, must get to see it!  I have booked to see it in November.  This is very exciting!

Here is some information on the exhibition:

The first large-scale exhibition in the UK of the work of American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (1960—1988).

Discover the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat, the pioneering prodigy of the 1980s downtown New York art scene. This unprecedented exhibition brings together an outstanding selection of more than 100 works from international museums and private collections. Engage in the explosive creativity of Basquiat who worked with Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Blondie, among others. Featuring rare film, photography and archive material, the show captures the spirit of this self-taught artist, poet, DJ and musician whose influence, since his death at 27 in 1988, has been enormous.”

https://www.barbican.org.uk/whats-on/2017/event/basquiat-boom-for-real

Chester Open Art Exhibition 2017

One of my prints is still on display and has just been sold!  It was made available for sale as part of the Chester Open Art Exhibition 2017.  I have suddenly realised I don’t think I posted this up as a news item on this blog!  Better late than never!

How the months fly by!

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved leap of faith (jennifer meehan) jenny meehan geometrical abstrace design artwork fine art print to buy

leap of faith jenny meehan (jennifer meehan) geometrical abstract design artwork fine art print to buy © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

https://chesterartcentre.co.uk/chester-art-centre-open-exhibition-2017/

Information about the venue…

Joseph Benjamin is a Chester restaurant owned and run by brothers Ben and Joe Wright. The idea behind the restaurant is simple – top quality food and drink in a comfortable and relaxed environment, prepared with honesty and integrity and served with care and attention.

Joseph Benjamin opens at 9am for coffee and breakfast. Lunch is served from noon till 3pm and then, on a Thursday, Friday and Saturday, dinner is served from 6pm.

David Gill, Jenny Meehan, James March, Michele Landel, Susan Welsby, Liz Fitzgerald-Taylor, Ian Hill Smith are the artists with work on display.

The work looks very nice indeed!  I did have a nice image of it in situ but cannot locate it right now, however will post when I have found it!

Becoming – Painting and Poem by Jenny Meehan

“Becoming
light and colour.
The poetic space
coming together.
In one, long, moment
I will take you there,
and you will see
beauty in brokenness. ”

Jenny Meehan

© Jenny Meehan  All Rights Reserved

 

catastrophe becoming painting 100days100women.wordpress.com, abstract expressionist lyrical romantic painting, jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

catastrophe becoming painting by jenny meehan submitted to 100days100women.wordpress.com british collectable abstract paintings

 

I have submitted the above work for an excellent project by author Henry Martin.  Who knows if anything will come of it or not, but I actually feel so glad that such a project is being done that I am delighted to submit whatever the outcome may be.  And thankfully no charge involved to submit.   That’s always a blessing.  Here is some of the call out text:

To celebrate the launch of the biography Agnes Martin: Pioneer, Painter, Icon (published March 2018) author Henry Martin will promote 100 women artists on the blog 100days100women.wordpress.com from November 2017–March 2018.

Painters, sculptors, textile artists, illustrators, graphic designers, ceramicists; artists of all practices are invited to send their work for consideration. Selected artists will be featured alongside invited artists including:

Ying Ang, Elinor Carucci, Eleanor Crow, Suzanne Dean, Milena Dragicevic, Joy Gerrard, Jenny Grigg, Anne Jordan, Polly Morgan, Adrian Piper, Aidan Salakhova, Karen Schiff, Heidi Specker, Clare Twomey, Jo Walker, and Bettina von Zwehl.

Henry Martin says, “100Days100Women is a corrective measure I can take as a biographer and art writer, to not only educate myself on contemporary art practice by women artists known and unknown to me, but also to fight against historical precedent in the disappearance of art by women in art history books, the marketplace, and human consciousness.”

The feminist writer Jill Johnston once said of Agnes Martin: ‘During every terrible decade it’s a pleasure finding a great woman.’ I believe that we live in such a terrible decade, but we are lucky that there are many great women still to find and champion.

Submissions can be made on 100Days100Women.wordpress.com, and followed on Facebook at @100Days100Women. “

 

I look forward to seeing the project unfolding.

 

Before Knee Replacement…

Do you know, I STILL look back sometimes to what life was like before my knee replacement.  With a sigh of relief it is over.  Now over seven months post op I can now RUSH around.  That’s new.  Good exercise, walking fast.  Fantastic to be able to make plans to see exhibitions in London with no doubts that I will be able to get where I need to go!  While the weeks and months after TKR are a huge challenge, I still hold to the precept that the time period of a year (at least) before was far worse. Because of going nowhere, and not even going nowhere fast.  Going nowhere SLOW.  And sometimes going nowhere at all!  The lack of mobility was killing me.

Had a bit of a dark phase before my TKR..Paintings at the end of 2016 went very dark…

Dark Night Painting by Jenny Meehan

This painting which I did put up on jamartlondon.com is still standing its ground.

dark night of the soul painting, abstract expressionist painting by jenny meehan, british 21st century female woman painter artist, lyrical abstraction,woman artists contemporary collectable, black white painting,jenny meehan jamartlondon,

dark night of the soul abstract painting jenny meehan jamartlondon

Dark Night Painting by Jenny Meehan. Available for sale, Please contact Jenny Meehan via the contact form on my website if interested in adding this work to your art collection!  http://www.jamartlondon.com

http://www.jamartlondon.com

I am standing around a lot too…  Kind of useful for painting!  Climbing up ladders and all sorts!  Back in action!

Female Abstract Expressionists

Terminology is crude, but I guess I would fit into that bracket.  I like to call my work “Romantic, Expressionistic, Abstract, Lyrical” painting.  But too many words for everyday use!

On the abstract expressionist theme, I have now taken some time to look into some female artists whose style can be defined as being in the abstract expressionist camp.  Abstract expressionism can reek of male dominance in my imagination… and there is possible a reason for this, as many female abstract expressionists seem to have dissolved more into the wings of the art theatre…

But women all over the world are completely immersed in the wonders of expression through non-objective painting…  And always have done…and always will!

Perle Fine is one painter I have looked at recently…

http://www.perlefine.com/collections.html

Quote Marika Herskovic:

“Perle Fine belonged to the early generation of New York School Abstract Expressionist Artists whose artistic innovation by the 1950s had been recognized across the Atlantic including Paris. New York School Abstract Expressionism represented by Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline and others.”

Few nice quotes by Perle Fine:

 

“Feeling is what we are involved with” and

“I don’t paint to sell and I don’t paint not to sell”

I will keep that in mind!

https://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/interviews/oral-history-interview-perle-fine-12709

From the transcript, quote I find most interesting right now:

“PERLE FINE: Yes. Well, after leaving the Hofmann School—well, of course this was happening all the time I was at the Hofmann School—I realized that there was no such thing as semi-abstract painting; that one couldn’t be semi-abstract any more than you could—well, it’s like saying I feel a little bit strongly about something, you see. Because for a thing to be abstract meant to me that you had to feel strongly enough about it to turn your back on realism and do everything necessary in an abstract way to put across a feeling which meant being totally abstract or non-objective.”

And very interesting reading on her process.

 

Perle Fine was married to the photographer and art director Maurice Berezov.  Despite her innovative exploration of Abstract Expressionism, which she fused with an interest in the pure forms of Neo-Plasticism, Fine was not included in the Whitney’s 1978 show “Abstract Expressionism: The Formative Years,” which she contested in two letters to the museum.  She later became a renowned professor at Hofstra University.

A quote from Perle Fine I find inspiring:   “I never thought of myself as a student or teacher, but as a painter. When I paint something I am very much aware of the future. If I feel something will not stand up 40 years from now, I am not interested.”

 

The “Very Patient Knee Replacement Story” goes on, and on, and on and on…!

Well back in September now I wrote my latest update. Waiting for the eight month mark for the next update, but cannot resist a little narrative here!

In September I focused a lot on post operative depression and also on how I found yoga very helpful in my rehabilitation.

I am most grateful that I discovered the practice of yoga through the Our Parks scheme, because it has made a huge difference to my health and happiness. When I started doing it a couple of years back it made me aware of how limited my mobility was, helped my limbs to keep moving and to be as flexible as was possible, and helped all my soft tissues both pre and post op. It generally re-introduced me to the joy and importance of movement, something I had lost somewhat over the years. I realised how integral movement is to my sense of self. It brought an appreciation of how an embodied contemplative practice is so very beneficial and facilitated my general orientation towards the contemplative way of life, including the practice of mindfulness, which was something I had already started to embrace.  So three hundred cheers for Our Parks!

https://ourparks.org.uk/

On the subject of yoga,  a collector recently brought the two “Yoga Inhale” and “Yoga Exhale” paintings.  I am pleased they are still together.  They look great in her home.

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reservedchakra colours painting, chakra colours art, chakra movement opening, yoga inhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reservedyoga inhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

 

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved yoga chakra colours opening painting art, chakra art, chakra dance, yoga exhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reservedyoga exhale yoga breathing inspired abstract painting by jenny meehan

I love it when my paintings find owners!

I have very real space issues here.  Living in a two up two down (well, three down!) house and being an artist presents some problems.  I am currently in the process of trying to organise all my work, equipment, materials and resources a little better.  Unfortunately this means that for a couple of weeks I have not done any painting at all.  I am getting irritable and cross.  However I will reap the rewards of being able to find things easier when it is done.  I now have quite a good system for locating particular paintings which is good because when art collectors are interested in buying one of my paintings, it helps a great deal if I can find it quickly!!!

 

Crossing Over, Letting Go and Entering the World of the Other

abstract lyrical expressionist british paintings jenny meehan

abstract lyrical expressionist british paintings jenny meehan

 

Crossing Over, Letting Go and Entering the World of the Other Painting by Jenny Meehan, available for sale please contact if interested. 

Available for sale, Please contact Jenny Meehan via the contact form on my website if interested in adding this work to your art collection!  http://www.jamartlondon.com

http://www.jamartlondon.com

The direction in my thinking on this painting above:

Deep Dialogue
Professor Leonard Swidler, in collaboration with Professor Ashok Gangadean, helped delineate the ‘Seven Stages of Deep Dialogue’ to describe the potential for dialogue leading to transformation. This narrative was intended as a meditation. This painting also: “Crossing Over, Letting Go and Entering the World of the Other”.

54x44cm external frame. Acrylic on Hardboard. Sealed with a protective layer of acrylic varnish. Light natural wood frame.

See more of this group of paintings on my website, jamartlondon.com.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/paintings-2017/4592780606 

Above is link direct to page.

 

In a bit of a fix…

A lot of my photographic art work involves images of fixings and fastenings of different kinds.  Images taken of buildings, mainly small out buildings like garages or beach huts, or garden gates or the backs of buildings seen from alleyways and rear access roads.  Most of these photographs were taken between  2007 and 2012, a period of five years which were for myself a period of certainly feeling I was falling apart, so maybe not surprisingly the orientation towards fixings was meaningful to me.   The need to hold myself together, though falling apart, is necessary for a mother who has care of others but needs to carry on functioning in life!  So the felt need was great!  In a big way, having responsibility for others can be helpful, even if tough times, as long as the strain is not too great.  Because you have to keep going.  But one needs to get help when falling apart from the inside.

It also occurs to me that the interest in fixings, which has translated itself into many of my paintings… mainly those with a structural, building type feel, like for example the “Nelson Square” painting, and it’s more recent “Nelson Square Two ” (which I am still working on, still in progress); this interest also says something maybe about my experience of having a bit of a “Fixer” relationship pattern.  I can see it more now, and am more aware of it, and it’s pitfalls.  Of which there are many!  But it is interesting as a creative… that love of putting things together, drawing together, uniting, balancing, melding things which are apart.  Articulating.  Joining. Building structure, and formation generally!  So positive and wonderful.  I spend myself and give myself through the process.  And this is rewarding.  I love it and find it fulfilling.  But to try and do this with other people is not good at all.  To try to do for others what is their own responsibility is very negative indeed.  As with many of our drives and urges, there is a positive and negative aspect.  It’s helpful to recognise both!  And so…

What is the  Fixer Relationship Type?

Note: Firstly, when categorising, it is important to realise that we are all rather piecemeal…The category is clumsy and only gives an approach to a personality…It is not there to confine or restrict but just to serve as an aid in thinking, and that alone.  The reality of each one of us is that we are far too complex to fall into any one category!!!

It sounds good, being a “fixer” but most people who tend this way learn their fixing behaviours in childhood, maybe by being burdened with inappropriate amounts of responsibility, in various ways, for example caring for siblings or even parents,  in “role reversal” where the child switches places with the adult.  It’s not good, but happens.  It’s hard to get out of the habit and so one tends to take it on into situations beyond childhood,  even seeking others to administer to!!!

This has an effect on the fixer’s adult relationships, as because one is looking for someone to fix, one tends to be drawn to those who maybe are not so able to participate in an equal relationship…The fixer may end up propping up the relationship more than is healthy and may get none or few of their own needs met.   This can also be limiting for the fixer, who may tend to believe that they will only be loved for what they do and not for the person they are.  Those who, in childhood, should have loved and taken care for them unconditionally, were not able to do that, and so the child was overburdened and understood that only if they do what their parents need them to do, may they have their own needs met.

So now, if you are a Fixer type, when you’d like to have a give and take relationship with another adult who is your equal, it is hard often to know how to let that happen. It can be scary to risk letting another person learn to love you for you, without you doing anything to bind that person to you for the care taking or other things you can do for them. Instead of rescuing someone or protecting them from themselves, you let them grow into their own personal sense of responsibility and you do the same for yourself in a way which has clear boundaries and which respects both yourself and the other person. The dynamic of you trying to fix things all the time can then stop, and if they are in discomfort or upset, you can feel their suffering, empathise, be compassionate,  but you don’t take responsibility for it.   Healthy boundaries are really worth developing!  You may choose to help in some way, but it won’t be because you are trying to earn their love.  And it is much easier to say “No” when you need to.

So from “fixing” to “mending”… A related activity, for sure… Beautiful mending, in the drawing together of different elements on a piece of board, using paint and card.  This is a healthy form of fixing activity!

“Mending” Painting by Jenny Meehan.  Available for sale.  Please contact if interested! 

lyrical abstraction contemporary artist british, female artist jenny meehan london based, lyrical abstraction process led painting,collectable abstract paintings for collectors, jenny meehan jamartlondon uk, art historical relevant significant art british,exploratory innovative paintings, british women artists current today,affordable original paintings to buy uk, collectable paintings original british contemporary a

abstract lyrical expressionist british paintings jenny meehan

This original painting is available for sale, Please contact Jenny Meehan via the contact form on my website if interested in adding this work to your art collection!  http://www.jamartlondon.com

http://www.jamartlondon.com

I think I may have only posted this painting up recently, but never mind.  It’s good to look at it again, while mulling over the interest in fixings!!!

 

Poem to accompany “Mending” Painting – Jenny Meehan 2016

 

I scream out to be fixed

because I have fallen apart

And everywhere I see fixings fixed on

panels and walls and buildings

And I, flat faced and dropping into my feet

Cannot stand the sight which draws me forwards

Because it testifies to the problem I face

Surrounding me, encapsulating me

with  horror struck security

But there is no comfort

Because nobody knows anything deeper than

my own panels

paint stained panels

painted

by rain

inside

and out.

 

© Jenny Meehan

Best FIXING experience of 2017 – Total Knee Replacement!

Well, my best fixing experience recently has been my TKR (Total Knee Replacement) surgery of March 2017.  It may have been painful but definitely worth it.  I need to be on my feet a lot.  Now I can be.  Surgery is a wonderful thing.  Mind you, I have been splitting my sides watching the BBC series “Quacks” of late.  It has me falling over with laughter. (The only falling over I am now doing!)  I don’t think I would want a surgeon let loose on my knee in Victorian times.  Thankfully, wonderful developments in modern medicine, healthcare, surgery and hospitals make something like knee replacement possible.

It is odd how my interest in trauma and recovery, which started orientated around the psychological and emotional type of trauma, took a leap into the physical realm with the TKR.  Surgery is traumatic for the body, and the body is connected to the mind and emotions.  I always dislike people referring to knee replacement surgery as “brutal” because while it is major, I don’t associate it with brutality.  (Maybe in Victorian times this would be apt!)  There is nothing cruel about surgery…it’s not violence.  Having experienced physical violence as a child and teenager, it becomes very important to recognise the difference. If one gets the two mixed up in the brain, it does not help healing or recovery one little bit. I was quite surprised in the bulk of my TKR recovery (ie first four months) how positive (mostly) I felt.  Yes, the body is traumatised and the surgery invasive.  But it is completely different when you willingly place yourself in a situation which is designed and intended to to heal and help someone.  It still isn’t easy.  But it is no way brutal.  I was so much wanting and needing the surgery, that I guess I was “up for it” in terms of my mindset.  Dealing with it is hard. Yet for me personally, the experience was much better than the longer term disintegration of my life which was falling apart due to the effect of long term pain and increasing physical disability.

It’s not gentle though!  Rather like being a bit of woodwork with all those saws and drills!

So worth it now though.  So worth it.

 

Yoga and Christianity Thoughts

Shared by Christians Practicing Yoga on Facebook.

Here’s a good summary of some important scholarly work on the history of modern postural yoga. It serves as a corrective to the idealized and frankly ahistorical versions taught in many yoga classes and teacher trainings.

http://www.popmatters.com/column/on-evil-yogis-and-the-icy-silence-of-yogas-post-disintegration/

 

I found the above an interesting read.   My own perspective of healing in relation to my own experience of practising yoga is that through my own practice I open myself up to the Holy Spirit and experience the benefits of Mindfulness with attention to my body which I find extremely helpful.  I am being kind and attentive to my body, valuing it, as a temple of the Holy Spirit.   Being introduced to Yoga a couple of years back  has been something I am very grateful for, and something which I have received a lot of blessing through.   Through the frustrations of my experience with osteoarthritis, I have found that what I CAN do, through the practice of Yoga has been a huge encouragement and helped me to continue to direct compassion and faith towards my humble frame.  The release of stress, the practice of being kind and attentive to myself, the continued choice, in the end, to love my body and work with it, accepting it and being grateful for it (even with the painful and often not working very well knee!) has brought a real sense of faith embodied which has been inspiring me to continue and to embrace the blessing of doing it.    It has been and is something completely incorporated into my devotional and prayer life…  It has helped me attend to myself and to my maker in a disciplined and very liberating way.

I have never felt any sense to conform to any beliefs that I do not hold or do not feel comfortable with.   Where I felt disagreement, maybe in some verbalised meditation,  I simple change direction and articulation of my thought, for example, rather than saying  “I am not my body”   I say (internally!) “I am not just my body”  because I personally don’t aim for separation of my parts, however, I do recognise the value in a consciousness that can view things from another perspective. (Apologies,  I am not in the know about the meaning of that phrase… It may be just poetic anyway and probably has many different interpretations/philosophies in hand…For others it may be essential to their experience of Yoga practice, but it is not for mine).

But I wander off.. I found the article a good read, and it gave me a little bit of an overview which I am sure is helpful to be aware of.  Particularly with respect to some of the scare mongering narratives which seem to circulate around discussions about Yoga in relation to Christianity.    I found this part of particular relevance to my own experience:

“…part of White’s research is to restore the understanding of historic yoga as a counterbalance to the modern New Age spirituality and self-help commercialism that now dominates the practice.
For example, in his 2014 book on the Yoga Sūtras, part of the Princeton University Press Lives of Great Religious Books series, he explicates Patanjali’s four-word definition of yoga (lacking any verbs, mind you) that has become the foundation of modern meditational practice: yoga-citta-vritti-nirodha.

While “citta” has a wide range of meanings in early Sanskrit, the most adequate nontechnical translation of the term is “thought”. As for “vritti,” it means “turning,” and is related to the –vert in the English words introvert (“turned inward”) and extrovert (“turned outward”) as well as invert, subvert, pervert, revert, and so forth. Nirodha is a term meaning “stoppage” or “restraint” in Sanskrit. A simple translation of yoga-citta-vritti-nirodha should then read something like “Yoga is the stoppage of the turnings of thought.”

White offers 22 different translations of this phrase from sources ranging from handbooks on modern yoga to the work of other scholars. Here are five:

Yoga is to still the patternings of consciousness.

Yoga is the ability to direct the mind exclusively toward an object and sustain that direction without any distractions.

Yoga happens when there is stilling (in the sense of continual and vigilant watchfulness) of the movement of thought—without expression or suppression—in the indivisible intelligence in which there is no movement.

Yoga is the control of thought-waves in the mind.

Yoga is the icy silence of post-disintegration.

That’s a whole lot of interpretation of four nouns lacking a verb.”

The above is quoted from the article on  popmatters.com and was written by William Gibson

On Evil Yogis and the Icy Silence of Yoga’s Post-Disintegration”  published 12th October 2015.  You can read the whole thing here:

http://www.popmatters.com/column/on-evil-yogis-and-the-icy-silence-of-yogas-post-disintegration/

 

In relation to my lack of mobility (now thankfully past!) I credit the practice of yoga as playing a key part in my journey to movement!  It was fantastic both before and after my knee replacement surgery, and obviously gentle and adapted, sensitive yoga, which focuses on body awareness and mindful appreciation of the body and movement, is a very helpful thing to do.  Relaxation is very important for a good recovery, and so some odd reason, quite difficult after knee replacement surgery.  So with the full lung breathing and directing breath towards areas of tension in the body…Well, it all helps!

A Few Photographs…

A few photographs… To fill the time which does not need to be filled!

Some of the things which strike me I capture in a photograph…It serves as a reminder for the times when I stopped to look a little longer.  Taking photographs can be a nice form of meditation…You cut out all the other things which call to be seen and focus in on the one which appeals to you the most.  Then, isolated, compose it carefully as you dwell on it even longer.  The best part of taking a photograph is the moment something strikes… It’s worth staying a while after taking the image to look at what you have seen a bit longer.  Drawing demands more of your time, and for that reason, photography comes in handy if you cannot stop for long…

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

This was taken in the New Forest on one family holiday.   I do love the weather beaten look!  The New Forest is somewhere I have visited many times.  It was particularly good this year as I could walk freely around in it!

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

A quiet moment spent in West Dean Gardens…It’s fun to get right down to ground level as this often makes for a more interesting composition.  Though my painting is abstract, it is observation of the beauty in nature which I would credit with informing it most.  You don’t need to recognise objects in an art work to appreciate the colour, form, movement, light and space.  I spend a lot of time looking at natural forms.

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

Here is the same place photographed from a greater distance with a less dynamic composition!  The tree in the middle makes the whole image very still, and it’s rather boring.  Getting up closer is something which often brings improvement, and trying out unusual angles and composition often yields better results.  However, there is also a rather nice restful feeling. Almost a reflection suggested and the horizontal line and equilibrium has its own appeal.

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny dohan jamartlondon photography

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

Just a few more.  We live in a world so saturated with images that the appeal of printing and presenting my photography has kind of got lost for me.  I sometimes produce work using my photography or photographic elements/collage.  It is useful at times.  I am not taking anywhere as many photographs as I used to.  Apart from the occasional spate of picture taking or working with past images. And of course the recording and archiving of my current paintings.  Images of paintings in progress can also be useful.

 

 

 

“Tree by Water”  Monoprint

tree by water monoprint 2017

© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved tree by water monoprint 2017

I entered this into “One-Off” – The Masters Monoprint Exhibition at The Bankside Gallery

(Thames Riverside
48 Hopton Street
London SE1 9JH

Tel. 020 7928 7521
info@banksidegallery.com)

Details here:

ONE-OFF | THE MASTERS | MONOPRINT

8 – 19 NOVEMBER

‘The Masters’ is a series of annual exhibitions established by the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers focusing on a particular branch of printmaking each year. This year’s exhibition will be curated by Morgan Doyle RE and will showcase works using monoprint in a variety of forms.”

But sadly it was not accepted.  Ah well, not room for everything!

I will  pop along to take a look though, I am sure it will be brilliant!

Painting – Being a Mother-Artist, Yet necessity is the mother of invention!  Plato in book 2 of The Republic wrote “Then, I said, let us begin and create in idea a State; and yet the true creator is necessity, who is the mother of our invention.”

Necessity is the mother of invention is my favourite phrase at the moment!

This time of year is mostly a time for reviewing and reflecting over past work.  This is partly because my studio tent is a complete mess, it is colder, the garden is wetter,(so not so good for painting in!) and I have had to bring my plants into the studio tent, so it is now functioning more as a green house!

This is so important.  It’s not about production.  Rotting leaves bring richness to the soil.  Sometimes you just leave things.  There is always plenty to do.  Looking backwards is part of moving forwards. It’s preparing the ground.

Looking at these two paintings below, reminds me of my recent movement from actual texture to perceived texture in my paintings.  And with the Matisse exhibition at the Royal Academy I visited recently having reminded me of pattern, I wonder if I may bring that in more?  The idea has been lurking around for a while but it hasn’t happened yet.  As I work on so many things in such a piecemeal fashion,  I find it a great asset that there are so many periods of time elapsing as part of the process of painting each painting.  So much opportunity to float ideas around, and yet not have them land all at once in the work which is happening.

It’s funny that what used to frustrate me, ie the necessary responsibilities of being a mother and homemaker, has turned out unexpectedly to help me in my work.  Now the children are a bit older, it is much easier to get my painting done.  Sometimes it is still annoying that I cannot spend more time painting.  But all the other stuff doesn’t seem to stop me.  I have learnt to prioritise things better.  It is a restriction.. because being an artist is not just about producing the work… there are so many other aspects.  So I am restricted by being a Mother-Artist, in some ways.   But I guess even if I was not, there would be other restrictions.  So it is best not to dwell on them.  In the end, being able to paint is a most fantastic freedom.   I will always be glad of it.  I am always exceptionally grateful for being able to do it. This is the main thing.

 

unerring want of running water painting jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

unerring want of running water  ONE painting jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

 

unerring want of running water painting jenny meehan© Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

unerring want of running water TWO painting jenny meehan

These two above, past paintings, 2016. Both were sold to the same art collector who wanted them both.  I am always pleased when my paintings find their new home.  Unerring Want (of) Running Water 2  was exhibited as part of the exhibition at Kingston Museum in 2016.  Details:

“Kingston Art 2016: Anagrams Opens Friday 29 April at Kingston Museum
29th April to 2nd July 2016
Opening on Friday 29 April at Kingston Museum, Anagrams is an exhibition which showcases the winning entries to a competition where artists from Kingston upon Thames’ local artists’ groups, ASC Kingston (Artists Studio Company Kingston), Hawks Road, Fusion Art and KAOS (Kingston Artists Open Studios), have entered new work under the theme Anagrams.

This is an exhibition of transformational art, where the art work and the artist’s explanations of how they have approached the theme give the viewer a fascinating insight into each artist’s way of seeing and working. Many different techniques are showcased from painting, drawing and photography to mosaic, installation and much more.”

 

me in front of anagrams kingston museum banner surrey art event

me in front of anagrams kingston museum banner

Nice to have my painting blown up!

I have always liked my work to be useful in many ways, so a section of the painting being used for the poster was a bonus!  I have lost weight since then, so I am shrunk down!

At present, on the practical front, I am painting edges,  and very small parts of very many paintings, making frames, looking, thinking, writing, tidying up mess and enjoying the bit of teaching I do very much indeed.  (Information on this below).

 Drop in Drawing and Painting Workshop

Here is the information I send out to interested people:

“As a trained teacher and experienced artist I am in a good position to mentor people and  can assist you in developing your own creative direction. Individual attention not possible in larger teaching situations make this a golden opportunity for personal creative development. It is friendly and supportive group, and offers you sensitive feedback, engaging activity, elements of challenge, and most importantly the emphasis is on you developing your own personal direction with your art working.

The Drop in Drawing and Painting sessions are organised so you are able to come along on a “one-off” basis. Please let me know at least a couple of weeks before, so I know about numbers, if possible.  There are a maximum of 3 places available.  There is a choice of both Wednesday or Friday across the course of the terms, which I have weighted in favour of people on the mailing lists stated availability. Please contact me via the contact form on my website jamartlondon.com if you wish to find out more.

http://www.jamartlondon.com/contact/4569980742

You do need to bring your own materials and equipment. If you need some advice about what to bring, just email me and I can give you some guidance. I normally have a few additional resources available, if need be, ie, pencils and paper, chalk pastels and poster paint. Sometimes it’s not always possible to know what direction you might take and I am happy to supply the unexpected material needs if they occur!

The forthcoming Drop-In Drawing and Painting sessions are as follows:

For 2017:
Wednesday 20th September 1 – 3pm
Friday 20th October 1 – 3pm
Wednesday 15th November 1 – 3pm
For 2018:
Wednesday 17th January 1 – 3pm
Friday 23rd February 1 – 3pm
Wednesday 25th April 1 – 3pm

After that I will be busy preparing for the Kingston Artists’ Open Studios 2018 and working more intensively on my own paintings!

If these dates are not convenient, it may sometimes be possible to arrange individual tuition at a cost of £20 per hour. Please contact me if you are interested and I can send you more information. My availability varies, but is restricted to week days (excluding Tuesdays) and during the hours of 9 – 3 during term times at present.

The idea of holding the Drop in sessions is that I am available to help you to develop your own projects and ideas. I will be there to add my technical and practical input, and help you by discussing your direction and the difficulties which may be encountered along the way, if you so require. As to what you actually do, this could be from drawing from the imagination, copying something from life, designing something abstract, or making a collage of text and images. Or simply experimenting and exploring what it is like to use a particular material or method of drawing.

People who come along range from absolute beginners to experienced artists, and have a range of different objectives.  Teaching input is organised around the individual, rather than delivered in a structured way, so it’s more akin to individual tuition/mentoring rather than class focused on a particular topic or course of study.  So these workshop style sessions will give you plenty of individual input and opportunities for feedback, discussion, and analysis, as you consider ways of developing your own direction.   It is informal and friendly, and provides a level of input not possible in a larger group.”

NHS Financial Pressures

I have an interest in healthcare, and as a very grateful recipient of a new knee, my appreciation of the value of the NHS has increased a lot!  I often read what the Kings Fund send out via their mailing list to me.  This was an interesting read:

https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/sites/default/files/field/field_publication_file/Understanding%20NHS%20financial%20pressures%20-%20full%20report.pdf

My own expression, of the visual type, is here:

NHS financial crisis, elective surgery joint replacement rationing, TKR graphic art, graphic image knee joint,abstract knee replacement design,abstract artwork knee joint, © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

NHS financial pressures knee replacement jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

This is currently being exhibited as part of the Art of Caring exhibition which runs until the 19th October at CONFERENCE CENTRE GALLERY, ST PANCRAS HOSPITAL, 4 ST PANCRAS WAY
LONDON, NW1 OPE.  Will be taken down soon!  Free to visit.  Lots of great work on show.   I need to go and pick it up next week.  They are having a closing event too:

THE ART OF CARING is an exhibition we are very proud of in our sometimes troubled and troubling times, looked closely, the sensitivity and joy to be found in the small detail of our artists work is deeply moving. The exhibition closes on THURS 19/10/17.  We are hosting a small closing event from 5.30pm to 7.30pm along with the premiere of Anna Bowman’s short film ARTS OF CARING at 6pm in which the filmmaker explores the exhibition and what it means for a number of the contributing artists who are filmed creating works at home and in studios. Do visit if you can…it’s a fresh looking exhibition still after 2 months display so far…Opens Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm.

Well, must go now.

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TO FOLLOW THIS ARTIST’S BLOG SIMPLY GO TO THE RIGHT HAND COLUMN, LOCATE THE  “FOLLOW” BOX AND POP IN YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS.  YOU WILL THEN RECEIVE MONTHLY UPDATES. 

 

Jenny Meehan (Jennifer Meehan) is a painter-poet, artist-author  and Christian contemplative  based in East Surrey/South West London.   Her interest in Christ-centred spirituality and creativity are the main focus of this artist’s journal, which rambles and meanders on, maybe acting as a personal (yet open to view)  note book as much as anything else.  

Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Contact Jenny via her website: 

http://www.jamartlondon.com/#/contact/4569980742

Jenny Meehan (Jennifer Meehan) BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE  offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details.  Availability depends on other commitments.    

 Jenny  works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces some representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings, other artwork forms,  and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.

This artist’s blog is of interest to artists, art collectors, art lovers and anyone interested in fine art.  Those interested in British 21st century female contemporary artists, women and art, religious art, spirituality and art, and psychoanalysis and art, will probably enjoy dipping into this Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.

Art collectors are often interested in the processes, techniques, interests and influences of the artists whose work they collect, and sharing my thoughts and perspectives through a blog is an important dimension of my creative practice.

My main focus is directed towards process led abstract painting, and you can view some examples of this on my website jamartlondon.com.  I encapsulate my painting as being romantic,expressionistic, abstract and lyrical.  Art collectors interested in lyrical abstraction, abstract expressionist, and essentially romantic art, are likely to find my paintings an interesting and exciting addition to their art collection. Art collectors can view a list of exhibitions I have taken part in on my websites exhibitions page; http://www.jamartlondon.com/#/exhibitions/4570944550

Art collectors can see selected examples of my original paintings  organised by year on jamartlondon which gives you a brief overview of the development of my painting over the years:

http://www.jamartlondon.com/#/paintings/4570156802

I am a self-representing artist, whose aim is to ensure  I continue to develop my painting practice in an innovative and pioneering way, rather than attempt some kind of commercial success, and whose aim is also that my work is historically relevant, rather then celebrated in that so called and illusive “art world”.  I hope to add to the number of people who value, collect, and develop an interest in my paintings and to thereby sustain and develop my practice over many years. 

I am also keen that my  art work is appreciated and accessible to as many people as possible, and am aware that not all art lovers and art collectors can afford to buy original paintings or limited edition prints.  For that reason I grant licenses for the use of my imagery. (See Redbubble.com and DACS information below). 

To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s  bi-annual  mailing list please contact Jenny via her website contact page:  www.jamartlondon.com

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

TO FOLLOW THIS ARTIST’S BLOG SIMPLY LOCATE THE  “FOLLOW” BOX AND POP IN YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS.  YOU WILL THEN RECEIVE MONTHLY UPDATES. 

 

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

A selection of non objective paintings can be viewed on pinterest:   https://uk.pinterest.com/Jamartlondon/

 

Help me continue my practice/art working:

 Jenny Meehan art images on Redbubble and Image Licensing through the Designer and Artists Copyright Society

If you would like a way of helping me in some small way, while benefiting from my art working yourself, then scoot along to redbubble.com where you can buy various products with my imagery on them.  It is a good company and they produce and sell their products with my images on.  I get a small royalty payment when something is sold.  It all helps a little. Here is the link to the pages on Redbubble.com which show prints with my imagery on them:

https://www.redbubble.com/shop/jenny+meehan+prints?cat_context=u-prints&page=1&accordion=department

My prints and some merchandise which uses my artwork can also be purchased safely and easily through Redbubble.com

Here is the link to the main Jenny Meehan portfolio page on Redbubble.com:

http://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams?ref=artist_title_name

 

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION

All content on this blog,  unless specified otherwise,  is © Jenny Meehan.  Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts of writing and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jenny Meehan with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  Images may not be used without permission under any circumstances. 

Copyright and Licensing Digital Images Information – Jenny Meehan

www.jamartlondon.com

Copyright in all images by Jenny Meehan is held by the artist.
Permission must be sought in advance for the reproduction, copying or any other use of any images by Jenny Meehan.

Copyright for all visual art by Jenny Meehan is managed by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) in the UK. If you wish to licence a work of art by Jenny Meehan,  you could contact Jenny Meehan in the first instance to clarify your requirements. There is a contact form on my website www.jamartlondon.com.  Alternatively you can contact the DACS directly;  https://www.dacs.org.uk/licensing-works

Licensing an image is quick and easy for both parties and is organised through the Design and Artist Copyright Society. (Note, my images are not shown on the “Art image” selection on the Design and Artist Copyright “Art Image” page. This does NOT mean you cannot apply for a license to use an image of my work from DACS… They simply have a very limited sample selection of work in their “Artimage” page!)

I have extensive archives of digital imagery, and keep records of all my art work, so  if you require an image similar to something of mine you have seen on the internet, it’s worth contacting me to see if I have something suitable for licensing if need be.  Use the contact form on my website jamartlondon.com to enquire:  http://www.jamartlondon.com/#/contact/4569980742

About Jenny Meehan (Jennifer Meehan) 

Jenny Meehan is an established artist who has been exhibiting for over ten years, mostly in the UK. Notable exhibitions include, most recently being selected for the Imagined Worlds touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ and inclusion in “Building Bridges, the Female Perspective” at Tower Bridge Victorian Engine Rooms in 2016. Jenny has been a keen supporter of various charity art exhibitions over the years including the National Brain Appeals ” A Letter in Mind” at Gallery@oxo, South Bank, London and the “Anatomy for Life” Exhibition for Brighton Sussex University Hospitals Trust in 2015

Selected by a wide range of judges in open submission exhibitions, her work appeals to the aesthetic and emotional discernment of many, and has been displayed in many prestigious galleries. These include the Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, in 2015, as part of their Open Exhibition, and the Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, West Sussex, as part of the Pallant House Gallery/St Wilfrid’s Hospice Open Art Exhibition in 2010.

Jenny Meehan’s work has been included in several academic projects and and publications including “Speaking Out – Women Recovering from the Trauma of Violence” by Nicole Fayard in 2014 and the ongoing “Recovery” Exhibition project – Institute Of Mental Health/City Arts, Nottingham University, also in 2014. While her romantic, lyrical, expressionistic, abstract paintings offer a contemplative space free from cares and concerns, other strands of her practice engage with subjects ranging from violence, trauma recovery, psychoanalysis, and mental health.

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