Jenny Meehan:  Romantic, Expressionist, Abstract, and Lyrical Paintings

Abstract Acrylic Painting/Markmaking with Colour. Instinctive intuitive process led painting, psychotherapy and art,psychotherapy and painting, British Contemporary female artist painter Jenny Meehan

deluge painting jenny meehan copyright DACS all rights reserved

“Deluge” Painting by Jenny Meehan referencing water,flood,deluge,catastrophe,disaster,trauma,house,home,wind,air.    I don’t paint to commission at all, but I do sell my old paintings when no longer needed for exhibitions, study, contemplation, etc.  This one I am happy to say “bye bye” to.   It has certainly stood the test of time, but needs another set of eyes to appreciate it I think.   It’s been exhibited a couple of times in the UK.

 

jenny meehan well spring rethinkyourmind NHS mental health resource art book selected jenny meehan

Well Spring painting by Jenny Meehan used on the cover of The Recovery of Hope by Naomi Starkey

 

The above painting “Well Spring” by Jenny Meehan.  This painting is referencing; spring, well, water,water spring,rocks,quarry,underground streams,recovery,spiritual and emotional renewal,sunlight,rays,beams,mist,water spray,evaporation.    Very strong painting, which cannot fully be appreciated on screen as there are glass beads used on the surface which bring a lot of added dimension.  This painting was used by designer Alison Beeck very skillfully and to great effect on the book cover of “Recovery of Hope” by Naomi Starkey.  You can take a look at the book cover here:

https://www.waterstones.com/book/the-recovery-of-hope/naomi-starkey/9780857464170

Synopsis: We live in the hope of experiencing first-hand the all-sufficient grace, love and forgiveness which are God’s alone, a hope that we may know with our heads long before we feel it in our hearts. Such hope may mean encountering God as consoling presence in the darkness, as well as one who challenges us to respond to his call. That call may prove to be costly but, in responding, we are transformed by discovering and rediscovering that we are known exactly as we are, yet still loved beyond understanding, as God’s precious children. In a series of Bible reflections – and some poems – this hope is explored in different ways, from the yearning of the psalmist to walking the gentle journey of the Good Shepherd’s leading.
Publisher: BRF (The Bible Reading Fellowship)
ISBN: 9780857464170

I have read the book (of course!) and it is very good.  Like a well, it is something I keep dipping into now and again.  Just right.  So glad the painting has served so well for a book cover.  Even better that the book is about something I care about!!!

I am willing to let this painting go also, so contact me if you are interested in it.  I have space problems here, and new paintings are being painted all the time.  So while I would retain this one for personal reasons on the one hand, I don’t think it possible to hold onto for much longer.

 

Acrylic, various fillers, acrylic mediums and pigments, and glass beads , sacred art painting religious, spiritual visionary painting, christ centred poetic visual art, The Comforter/St Julian - Jenny Meehan

The Comforter/St Julian – Jenny Meehan
Acrylic, various fillers, acrylic mediums and pigments, and glass beads

Above we have a painting titled “The Comforter/St Julian”  This painting is referencing the  Holy Spirit, comforter, counsellor, human intervention, divine intervention, figures, help, psychotherapy and painting, past and present, container, emotional container, catastrophe, smoke,fire ,anger, emotional landscape, freezing, burning, meeting.  This painting marks the beginning of a more contemplative path for me in my life and also an embracing of psychotherapy as part of that process of self-development, bound intimately with spirituality, in particular Christ-centred spirituality, which is where my own heart lies most happily.

This painting is also one I am happy to let go of.  It has an interesting surface and is a good example of one of my paintings with a more subtle and restrained use of colour, yet with a strong and dynamic mark making element.

 

47 nelson square surviving houses,jenny meehan psychotherapy art post traumatic stress, painting modernist 21st century female british fine artist. house mind process led painting,guild of psychotherapists art,therapy painting,

Final version of Surviving Houses/47 Nelson Square

“Surviving Houses/47 Nelson Square” is a painting firmly rooted in my early experiences of participating in a psychoanalytic/psycho dynamic process in order to re establish my own foundations which were certainly bomb hit.

This painting is referencing 47 Nelson square, Lambeth, Southwark, London, trauma recovery,Guild of Psychotherapists, Psychotherapy,survival,house,rooms,hope,sun,windows,light sources, insight,mental and emotional ordering,fear,anxiety,safe place, security,warmth home,construction,reconstruction,mind as a building.

This painting is not available.  It’s interesting for me to compare this with recent work which also uses very bold brush work. (See below!!)

Good Read on Copyright Infringement 

 

https://www.dacs.org.uk/latest-news/copyright-uncovered-infringements?category=For%20Artists|For%20Licensing%20Customers|Latest%20News&title=N

Small quote here:

An infringement can occur when someone directly copies one of your works in its entirety or if they use substantial elements of your work without your permission.

What is determined by ‘substantial’ is not necessarily about proportion or size. A small but distinct element of your work can be copied and this could still amount to an infringement.

In previous UK court cases – for example, where an artist has been accused of infringing another artist’s work, or where a company has used parts of an artist’s work on a product they are selling – the assessment for copyright infringement has been made by looking at the similarities, rather than differences.

For copyright infringement to be determined there must be a connection between the infringing work and the original work – the infringement has to be derived from the original. There are ways of establishing the connection by looking at surrounding circumstances, such as availability. For example, the original work could be easily accessed online or in public exhibitions. Additionally, any contact with the infringing party such as discussions to use the work, or even engagement on social media, will help establish that they were aware of your work before making the infringing version.

The test for infringement is done on a case by case basis. If you claim your work has been infringed, you will have to prove this. Once it has been established, it will be for the person potentially infringing the work to prove they have a defence, for example that their work was their independent creation. Copyright infringement is known as a ‘strict liability’ offence, which means that it is irrelevant whether or not the infringer knew or wanted to infringe copyright.
– See more at: https://www.dacs.org.uk/latest-news/copyright-uncovered-infringements?category=For%20Artists|For%20Licensing%20Customers|Latest%20News&title=N#sthash.QixIArcE.dpuf

It’s a very important matter, and artists who are professional in approach should certainly ensure they understand how it works.  I am a member of DACS and find it a very helpful and important organisation.

Busy Paintings

I have been feeling that my recent very full and rather busy paintings, lovely as they are, need a little respite and so have been working the tail end of this year on some which are far less crowded and more simple.  With my usual attention to surface, and working with the pigments which I am particularly fond of, I have sought to obtain a balance between dynamic energy and restfulness.

 

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“No Fear” painting by jenny meehan abstract lyrical expressionist british paintings jenny meehan

 

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“The Realm of Between/Pushing it a bit” abstract lyrical expressionist british paintings jenny meehan

It has been interesting to experiment with the relationship between quite delicate and intricate variations in perceived and actual texture along  broad and very matt, almost sheaths, of paint, laid down on unprimed hardboard.

 

jenny meehan lyrical abstraction british 21st century emerging artist contemporary, london based female artists fine painting british women artists jenny meehan, christian art contemplative spirituality art, contemplative meditational aids for reflection through art and painting, jenny meehan jamartlondon collectable original paintings affordable,

“Crossing Over/Simple Piece” abstract lyrical expressionist british paintings jenny meehan

Some time of  “less is more” to challenge that part of me which last year was placing daub upon daub of colour.  I am not unhappy with those paintings… not at all, but need to balance out that experience of painting with something different.

Helpful quotes, and my comments,  from “The Art of Buying Art” by Alan Bamberger. The section entitled “How to Look”.
“How to Look
“Looking at art means more than giving casual glances as you pass it by. You’ve got to spend time studying individual pieces.

Indeed… There is too much casual glancing going on nowadays.  We are bombarded with some much imagery.  I also believe just focusing on one small part of an art work is beneficial.  This is partly why I plan to start another blog soon focusing on passages of my paintings.  To immerse oneself needs time.
“Stand up close and focus on small areas of the art. Stand back and look at the whole thing. Stick your nose right up to the canvas or wood or paper or bronze and study the minutest details. Back away slowly and watch how the art changes. Move so far away that the art fades into its surroundings.”

What comes to mind now is the frustration of paying to see an exhibition and then not being able to view the work properly due to too many other people, distractions and also, because one is paying for a single visit, the pressure of seeing everything in one go.  How much better it is then to see exhibitions which do not charge, for then you can go back as many times as you want!

Looking at every element and aspect of a work, and giving it time is essential.

This is helpful:

“If you happen to see something you really like, note what it is, where you saw it, how it looks, and why it attracts you – nothing more. You’ll have plenty of opportunity to return and learn more about it later. By experiencing a little bit of everything that’s out there and taking some time to study it in detail, you begin to acquire strength of conviction and begin to define what really thrills you.”

Strength of conviction is kind of related to confidence.  Confidence that your own experience matters and that that experience is the most important thing about the art work you are viewing.  I had an interesting conversation recently with someone unfamiliar with appreciating non-objective paintings.  I simply said “Don’t worry about what it is meant to be.  What it is to me is of interest, but it is not that that matters.  You have your own experience of this painting and that is what matters.  She was worried that I would be offended if my painting was not what it was for me.  I explained that if it mattered to me I would paint more representational paintings which gave the viewer more direction and prescribed more what the subject matter was.  It would then be rather offensive if they thought my, horse, for example, was actually a man.

But with a completely abstract painting, though I will have my own personal interpretation,  for the viewing, this does not matter to the extent that it should dictate their experience of the painting.  They may find it of interest, and they may ask me what the painting is to me.  But it is what the painting is to them which matters.  They have a huge part to play in the experience of viewing the paintings.  Once they have the assurance that there isn’t some hidden, strange, meaning or concept that they have to “get” in order to access the work, they suddenly find that the freedom to experience it in their own way is quite a liberating and enjoyable matter.  Well, some people do.  Others find they want and need to be told “What it is”.  This is fine, of course.  However, they may have to accept that it is not definable in the way that they would like it to be!!!

I have now settled on the practice of including references (as I have done in this post) for those who are interested in the relationship between my abstract paintings and their significance/meaning for me.  But I would never feel upset if someone did not see what I see.  We all have valid perceptions and what we see is influenced by ourselves, our experience, and our emotions.

Alan continues:
Out of all the millions of art pieces that have ever been and have yet to be created, you will choose to own maybe one, maybe five, maybe one hundred. And you’ll choose them because they mean something special to you and you alone. Now is the time to acquire a feel for where that special meaning lies, and to identify what qualities in art attract you the most.”

Perfectly put.   “Something special to you and you alone”.

I like this advice very much. For those wanting to get into collecting art, it is probably the most important piece of advice to heed. The book  has a lot of advice, and quite a lot of it focuses on art which no doubt considerably more expensive than my own, however, there are many key points and while not a recent book, being published in 2007, I still found it an interesting read.
I have not considered myself how much of a mine field it must be for some people who want to collect art but are not familiar with the various systems (ie galleries, dealers). I think the chapter on buying directly from the artist of most use and of relevance to my own experience. Indeed, the way people buy art has changed a lot. For the majority, I think, it is much easier, more accessible and pretty straightforward. The book includes chapters on buying directly from artists, and also buying art over the internet. I cannot be done with all the speculative buying, “art world” and dealer dealing matters personally. But there are chapters which offer very interesting insights into a realm which lies well outside my own remit. And I cannot help feeling rather thankful that my own work is not being handled by dealers!!!

The so called “Art World”

With no aspirations towards business, profit, fame or financial success, I have mercifully relieved myself of the whole so called “art world”; that world of art, which I have no desire to enter. I am not sure where the boundaries of this mysterious “art world” lie, but I suspect they lie in the imaginations of those who consider themselves part of it.  And if the determining factor of being in or out of it,  is money and status driven, and to do with who you know, then it may be best that I do consider myself an “outsider artist”…if that is what that term means.  (I am sure I have rambled on about outsider art before in this journal.) But I don’t like the whole insider/outsider definition.  We are all inhabiting the same world, in truth.  The aim for the artist could be to see ourselves as continual welcomers…with the aim of continually inviting people in to an experience of our artistic practice which aims to educate and enlighten, enrich and nourish the imagination and hearts of all. Fame and fortune will just be for the very few. And this may be good for them in many ways.  But it is not a good hope.  I focus on people, relationships, and creativity.

I have been thinking about what a “professional” artist is.  I consider myself one. As a professional artist, the idea that in order to be professional, ones activities should be financially profitable, is a huge mistake in my opinion. Professionalism is an attitude and an approach that does not need too be qualified with monetary gain. It’s more about how you go about what you do, and how you think of it.   Things such as exhibiting your work, cataloguing it, having faith in what you are doing, and having collectors and followers who engage with your work are important. Taking it seriously and investing in it in a professional manner. Engaging in training and development.  Being part of groups of artists and networking.  Looking for new projects and opportunities.  Being open minded and receptive to whatever creative currents are weaving their way about the age in which you live in.  Being professional is an attitude and approach more than anything else.  A way of thinking about what you do and understanding the value of it. An attitude of rigour to ones work.  And discipline.

The fact that some activities in life are not termed a “job”, and are rather a vocation, (and caring for others, raising children, plus many voluntary activities come under this banner) does not mean that they are either hobbies, optional for the person doing them, or of lesser importance.  A vocation may not count officially in respect of it not being counted in the “labour market”,  but this does not mean that that it is not work, and should not therefore be valued. Thankfully there are plenty of people who do recognise that vocation in life is sometimes expressed in part through paid employment, be it self-employment or as an employee, but that this is only the case for some, and there are millions of other people who fulfil their calling in life through other avenues.  Vocation can be:

1.
a particular occupation, business, or profession; calling.
2.
a strong impulse or inclination to follow a particular activity or career.
3.
a divine call to God’s service or to the Christian life.
4.
a function or station in life to which one is called by God.

Indeed, we are not singular in purpose or vocation.  We have many strands running through us.  At different times they will be developed and come into being and we will be active to a greater and lesser degree.  Sometimes circumstances help, and other times they hinder.  What I was involved in ten years ago is different to what I am involved in now.  But all the strands of my life contribute to who I am, to my art working, and to how I see what I do.

As far as I can see, the majority of artists I have come across are not financially “successful” in the sense that they do not generate an income, from the sale of their work, which is anything near capable of meeting their most basic human needs. They rely on other, often related activities, to help sustain them in life, normally in employment of some kind or being part of a partnership or community which helps them financially. This is one of the reasons I get cross about ridiculous submission fees for artists wanting to exhibit their work.  To treat artists showing their work as some kind of business venture for the artist, which therefore they should be prepared to pay for, it just not the case. (I read this recently, I cannot remember where, and was furious.) The chances of selling your work at an exhibition are pretty low.  There are thousands of wonderful artists, for which I am glad, but even the good ones don’t necessarily sell much work.  It does happen, but only occasionally, for the majority.  And it costs money to take part, even without submission fees. Time, travel, framing… all that kind of thing.  This is not a moan, by the way. That is just the way it is. If I wanted money and that was my aim, then I would do something else with my life.

I have realised that I personally am not able to mix painting with any aspirations of business or profit making.  I have thought about it in the past, but other time commitments have pretty much nipped that in the bud before the bud even appeared!  And I have questioned myself, and sifted out what I really want, from what I do.  A little bit of occasional recompense here and there is always welcome, and helps towards material costs in some small way. (It certainly is occasional! But good when it happens.)  I consider a professional approach from myself in all that I do, as essential to the value I hold in what I do, yet this is simply as far as it goes.  I think what I do is more of a creative mission.  It’s something about me simply being in the world what I feel I am meant to be.  Something which is like breathing and serves the same purpose.  Which comes out with no external aim in mind but the mere act/material of being.  I can accept that, and I like it.  I don’t need anything else to validate it.

But still, it is lovely when someone decides to collect your art.  I am delighted when the chord is struck, and I wave bye bye to one of my paintings.  So much of what artists do (fine artists, I mean) is speculative.  It is a hit and miss matter.  Once in a blue moon you sell something.   That’s always nice.  But certainly not dependable!  Artists should technically  be paid if their work is shown in an exhibition. They provide the material substance of an art exhibition.   I have little hope of this happening, as it is  not the way the system works at all, but when you provide part of the material for an exhibition, you are offering your work for a use, of sorts.  People come to see the art work.  What would the exhibition be without it?

Thankfully, we at least have some options for exhibiting art work with no submission fees, or very low ones.  Unless exhibitions are very big/renowned, charges are not made to people viewing the work, and people don’t consider paying to see an art exhibition as something that they would need to do, unless the artists were famous.  I am all for people seeing art exhibitions for free.  But not so keen on the idea of artists paying for them to do so!  Artists bear many costs when exhibiting work.  We don’t need any more costs!  Artists desire to show and share our work, which is a vital part of what we do.  It’s not about showing what we can do. (Well, I speak personally, but I am not alone in this respect) It’s about opening eyes to new possibilities.  Creative energy.  Visual education.  Opening up the mind and spirit.  Emotionally connecting.  There are some opportunities which don’t have submission fees. Always grateful for those.

Sadly, artists are sometimes used by organisations and individuals as a way of generating money. It is not surprising, and not always the case, but it is good to be aware of it.  It is something to do with some strange idea that having work in an exhibition makes an artist more successful, (in the public perception) I think. It is always nice to have your work  selected for exhibition, of course.  Yet it is simply fortunate if your work gets shown. Nice.  Pleasing.  After all, we want it to be viewed!!!!  But the cost of doing so must be counted, as all costs need to be.  Juried exhibitions generally come down to what the taste of the jury is.  And not a lot more than that, in the end.  Why would it be anything more? It may sometimes be a case of who know’s who, and existing links.  That just happens.  Some themed exhibitions can be more of a quest… and can be interesting in this respect. There is satisfaction in exploring a theme or concept and coming up with something very apt and fitting.  There is a challenge which makes selection more rewarding if your work hits the core of some issue or theme.  Exhibitions for charities are rewarding, in that it is a great way to give to charity and show work.  Artists can bear some costs, but the addition of a submission fee is quite frankly annoying.  Minimal, it must be, if it is made at all.  Certainly under a tenner!  “Admin Fee”… but no more.  And one fee, however many works.

It is a fundamental error, I think, to equate success as a fine artist, with money. With fame, or fortune.   If you are able to invest your time into art working, then you are fortunate even in that. There are many people in the world who have to spend all of their time simply fetching water.  I am highly aware of the blessings and benefits of my own situation in life. I am fortunate to be able to do what I do, and I thrive in it. I overheard an interesting conversation on the train recently.  And it was in this conversation the nail was hit on the head.  “Money is not the same as Value”.  Thank you, to the person who said that.

I value my work.

But as is the case with homemaking, and/or domestic and caring work carried out by people (who happen to be related to those they care for), or who work in many fields voluntarily, fine artists too find themselves in the realms of those who do work, but who are not part of the labour market.  But my main point is, if you are an artist, don’t believe that your only option is to sign up for the “starving artist” or the “financially successful artist”.  The success of what you do can be judged by other criteria.  It is my opinion that success is to do with connection, growth and development.  Success for me is when a painting is done and I look at it, and see it is finished.  When I learn and progress.  When research, training, and education are part of what I do. When my work develops and resonates with a sense of integrity and truthfulness to experience and life.  When someone relates to it, uses it, connects with it, responds to it.  When it’s relevance is something felt by them.  Which brings us neatly back to the earlier quote:

“Something special to you and you alone”.

“Out of all the millions of art pieces that have ever been and have yet to be created, you will choose to own maybe one, maybe five, maybe one hundred. And you’ll choose them because they mean something special to you and you alone. Now is the time to acquire a feel for where that special meaning lies, and to identify what qualities in art attract you the most.”

And I think the artist creator themselves also needs to have this either as their sole focus,or certainly main focus, and preoccupation.  There must be nothing else in the way.  This does not make paintings done for other people any less worthy, but somewhere in the centre of the process there must be a connection which is not comprised.  It doesn’t make anything more art or less art, but, if you want to be a successful fine artist who gets a real sense of reward from what you do, then do what you do in your way, and stick to that. All the time seek to learn and develop.  If you sell and your work is useful to others that is a great bonus.  If it matters to you (and/ or you need it),  that  you have some kind of business/monetary success and you want to develop what you do in that way, then of course,  there is nothing wrong with that at all.  It is an exciting and challenging aim, and many artists want to be self employed as artists.  Often doing something for someone else’s criteria and requirements can open up new and exciting avenues.  It is one path. But just one.

Commercially viable art working is the aim of some artists, and there are plenty of online courses and programmes to follow for those who want to try it out. But being commercially viable is not the same thing as successful.

I like this:

“Society needs artists, just as it needs scientists, technicians, workers, professional people, witnesses of the faith, teacher, fathers and mothers, who ensure the growth of the person and the development of the community by means of that supreme art form which is “the art of education.” Within the vast cultural panorama of each nation, artists have their unique place… The particular vocation of individual artists decides the arena in which they serve and points to the tasks they must assume, the hard work they must endure and the responsibility they must accept… There is therefore an ethic, even a spirituality of artistic service, which contributes in its way to the life and renewal of a people.”

(From the Letter of His Holiness Pope John Paul II “To Artists.”)

“There is therefore an ethic, even a spirituality of artistic service, which contributes in its way to the life and renewal of a people.”

 

Found this, and will make it some reading:

http://theotherjournal.com/2012/01/16/are-artists-the-high-priests-of-culture-part-i/

 

Ahh, Blow!  Sandra Blow! 

I am unable to walk very far at present… and this means that I cannot pop along and see the exhibition of eleven late works of the British abstract painting Sandra Blow, which is being presented by The Fine Art Society.  I have to keep my walking to the most essential, and while I would like to see this exhibition, it would involve a lot of walking.

The British abstract painter Sandra Blow (1925-2006) was influenced by Italian post-war art and by the American Abstract Expressionists.  I was very delighted to find that the collector who purchased my “London Downpour” also had a work by Sandra Blow, and it was, I have to confess, pleasing to think my work would be hung in a collection which included a piece by Sandra Blow.  There were other names of works mentioned, but only Sandra Blow stood out for me, because I have encountered her painting “Space and Matter” at the Tate, and admired it. Sandra Blow was very occupied with the material of her paintings, and “Space and Matter” involves the use of liquid cement, chaff and charcoal.  She worked in a process led and  intuitive way which I always find interesting.   The term sometimes used is “Art Informel” which was a term coined by the French critic Michel Tapié.  Sandra Blow spent time at “Eagles Nest” which was Patrick Heron’s home and then she rented a cottage at Tregerthen.   She enjoyed the encouragement and patronage of Heron, Roger Hilton, and Peter Lanyon.   (Peter Lanyon’s paintings have had a significant influence on my own approach.)

St. Ives and the sea were great sources of inspiration to Sandra Blow in the end phase of her career.

 

Sandra Blow said “Now I have more enjoyment, and knowledge of what happens when I do what I do. The pressures have gone, the striving to find something. I do work I know is good, and I know how to do it.”

The exhibition at The Fine Art Society is at 148, New Bond Street, London, W1S 2JT.  It runs until 30th January 2017

 

http://www.sandrablow.com/page2.htm

On the Knee …

I now have a pre-op assessment appointment…  Going round the house putting up unfinished paintings everywhere so I can work on them.  “Work on them” in this case will mean looking at them.  I have a tablet and I am going to experiment with using it to help me explore options.  I normally need to stand and walk a lot, applying paint, and then taking it off.  I am hoping that by taking an image and making visual notes I might make some progress on some of the paintings which are nearly done.  However, this won’t be sufficient, as I need to see the actual pigment on the painting, the texture, the exact brush stroke.  But it may help with some decisions.  I will wait and see.

I also have a lot of books I plan to read and look at.

Seems like life will be a mixture of pain management, exercises, some resting and recovery.  Challenging.

“Angles and Edges”  Experiment below, inspired by the whole knee journey!

"Angles and Edges" Knee Replacement inspired art work image by Jenny Meehan. © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

“Angles and Edges” Knee Replacement inspired art work image by Jenny Meehan. © Jenny Meehan DACS All Rights Reserved

 

I read there are seven key cuts in a knee replacement operation:

 

Seven cuts to the perfect total knee.
Brooks P1.
Author information
Abstract
There are a total of 7 bone cuts in a typical total knee replacement (TKR): distal femur, anterior femur, posterior femur, anterior chamfer, posterior chamfer, tibia, and patella. Each of these cuts has its own special science, and each cut can affect the other cuts and potentially the outcome of the TKR. The distal femoral cut starts the overall alignment of the leg. Five degrees of valgus is cosmetically appealing, avoids excessive valgus, and prevents thighs from rubbing together. The anterior femoral cut sets femoral component rotation, which has effects on patellar tracking and gap balancing. In most knees, correct rotation is approximately 3 degrees of external rotation compared to the posterior condylar axis. An important exception is in valgus knees, where this could lead to accidental internal rotation. The posterior condyle cuts, with the tibial cut, determine the flexion gap. Injury to the medial collateral and posterior cruciate ligaments should be avoided. Anterior and posterior chamfer cuts must avoid these ligaments as well. The tibial cut is challenging. A 3 degrees posterior slope is most typical, and rotation is crucial. Internal rotation is a common error, affecting patellar tracking. Changing rotation on a sloped cut also adds varus or valgus. The patella cut should not be too deep. Component placement should tend medial and superior. If a lateral release is necessary, it should be done from inside-out, with preservation of the blood supply.

This is of interest to me, in appreciation of the art of surgery!  My image has rather random cuts pretty much everywhere; “Angles and Edges” seemed apt though, for this image.   I liked the suggestion of shine in the image.  Light bounces off objects,  and light of course is a natural preoccupation!  So it is an image which alludes to the importance of precision, mathematics and the surgeon’s skill, but rather plays around with the actual object with that joyous and wonderful “Art licenselo” or Artistic License. An image which relates to face, but denotes the distortion of fact.  My fictional image for my real situation!   However, I hope my own knee is very factual indeed!!!!!!!!

I continued to work on the image and then came up with the “Cutting Edge” design, which has a more abstract reference to the figure of a knee replacement but I think retains enough of the structure.  You can see that here;

 

http://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/works/24202274-cutting-edge-abstract-knee-replacement-design-by-jenny-meehan?asc=u&c=231599-geometric-abstract-prints

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About Jenny Meehan

I am a painter/visual artist/contemplative/poet/writer and mother, based in Surrey/South West London, UK.
Interested in spirituality (particularly Christ centred spirituality), creativity, emotional and psychological well-being.

I exhibit mainly in the UK, and am a member of Kingston Artists’ Open Studios. I have  trained  with SPIDIR as a spiritual guide/mentor. I am a qualified teacher and hold occasional small groups in developing painting and drawing skills, and general visual creative expression.

Contact me via the contact form on my website http://www.jamartlondon.com if you would like more information with respect to art tuition, and/or if you wish to receive my my bi-annual newsletter.

My artistic training has been through the Short Course programme at West Dean College, Surrey and through local adult art education classes. Professional in approach, I exhibit widely over the UK.

Please note that all images of my artwork are subject to copyright law: All rights reserved: Jenny Meehan DACS (Designer and Artist Copyright Society). In the first instance, contact me, and I will refer, as/if appropriate.
http://www.jamartlondon.com

TO FOLLOW THIS ARTIST’S BLOG SIMPLY GO TO THE RIGHT HAND COLUMN, LOCATE THE “FOLLOW” BOX AND POP IN YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS. YOU WILL THEN RECEIVE MONTHLY UPDATES.

 

imagined worlds exhibition alph the sacred river coleridge kubla khan jenny meehan

imagined worlds exhibition alph the sacred river coleridge kubla khan jenny meehan

 

As per normal, skim down, as I have written far too much for a single post, but added and added and added!!!!

Imagined Worlds Exhibition – A touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1816.

Good news.  My work has been selected for this touring exhibition “Imagined Worlds Exhibition – A touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ ”

Imagined Worlds Exhibition – A touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1816. This is a celebration by the Friends of Coleridge supported by Somerset Art Works, working in partnership with the National Trust, CICCIC Taunton, and Art at the Heart, RUH Bath.

CICCIC Memorial Hall, Paul St, Taunton TA1 3PF 7 October -12 November 2016 . Special PV 21 October 2016

Mid November – January tbc

RUH Bath Mid January – Mid April 2017

Coleridge Cottage Nether Stowey Mid April – May 2017

I am delighted about this.  Coleridge is a poet I both studied at degree level and very much enjoy.  So pleased to make my own response present in this way.  The work I submitted is here, shown above,  along with the information I prepared to accompany it.
Jenny Meehan is a well established South West London based artist whose art work evolves in a process led way, dependent on both intuition and imagination. She studied Literature at Kingston University and after working as a teacher for several years has spent the last ten years developing her creative practice, which includes painting, printmaking and poetry.
The artwork submitted responds to the water element in the poem ‘Kubla Khan’; “Alph, the sacred river” whose mysterious flow runs through its lines. Resonating with emotional highs and lows and “meandering with a mazy motion”, it carries the listener along with it.
Water is a subject matter which often preoccupies Jenny, occurring as a repeated motif in many of her paintings and prints. An interest in the subconscious and the resulting exploration of “caverns measureless to man” attracted her to this image in the poem.
Other Information
Jenny Meehan
j.meehan@tesco.net
Title of Work: “Alph, The Sacred River 1”
Image sent with email. Price: £ 200
Dimension 36 x 27cm
Medium: Ink jet Print on Cartridge Paper 1/10 Limited Edition

Over the Summer we stopped by outside Coleridge Cottage Nether Stowey.  We had got a little lost but when I saw the sign I took it as an added bonus to see the cottage, if only from the outside!

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/coleridge-cottage

It does not seem to be open every day, but a few times a week.  I am very pleased to think of my visual art residing in the same building as the poet himself.   I am very pleased with the way I framed it.. I found the frame over the Summer and instinct told me to buy it…I knew it would be useful.  It works well with the flow feeling of the print.  I am also pleased that there is an illusion of reflection happening.  The photograph here was taken without glazing, yet there is an appearance of reflection which is apt for the piece.  I have now glazed it, and it looks doubly reflective!  Suitable for a poem by Coleridge!

 

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photo black white copper work metal work copper foliage jenny meehan

jenny meehan jamartlondon photo black white

Above:  Copper Fern 1 by Jenny Meehan  (Image of “Copper Fern” by Jenny Meehan)

jenny meehan jamartlondon photo black white copper

jenny meehan jamartlondon photo black white

Above: Copper Edge (Image of “Copper Edge” by Jenny Meehan)

jenny meehan jamartlondon photo black white copper work copper jenny meehan

jenny meehan jamartlondon photo black white

Above: Copper Fern 2 by Jenny Meehan (Image of “Copper Fern” by Jenny Meehan)

 

Ah, October.  Lovely spiders, everywhere.  I walk into them.  Watch them weave. And leaves are changing. Creeping edges of colour; yellow, orange, black, red.  Damp green grass, and the birds sound louder.  I like this time of year. Even the rain.

I planned to start some printmaking, but my right knee, with it’s osteoarthritis, is making everything take longer.  And so time is short; too short to start a new project right now.  I cannot walk very quickly.  I have had a lot of pain in the last few weeks.   I am doing a lot of  exercise, and physiotherapy, and “Better Bones” classes.  But my bones are not better.  It is what is around them that needs attention. My legs are certainly stronger. And I am less heavy.  Let the weight loss continue.  But how I wish I could walk for longer than 20 minutes, without a stick, and without severe pain at the end of it. I do not like this.  It is a miserable matter.  I cry and get cross.  Cry and Cross! There may be a title for a painting there!

So, with domestic work, and various voluntary activities,  plus exercise, exercise, exercise, the time is all used up. But I have managed to make some frames for paintings carried out over the Summer.  Which I quite like doing. And need for next year.  And I have also spent some time discovering more about Bessel van der Kolk…

Bessel van der Kolk

http://www.traumacenter.org/about/about_bessel.php  Very interesting.  Just listened to a talk by Bessel van der Kolk, MD called “Trauma, Body, and the Brain: Restoring the Capacity for Synchronicity and Imagination,” an exploration of how the brain is shaped by experience and how our relationship to ourselves is the product of our synchronicity with those around us.  Wonderful talk, very interesting and inspiring!

I have also been listening to several different talks which I was able to access through an online training summit, all focused on Neuroscience, Trauma, Mindfulness, and Attachment Therapy.  I am a big fan of Margaret Wehrenberg (not personally, because I don’t know her at all!!!) but certainly of her books which I have found very helpful personally, and as she was speaking on one of the sessions, I thought I would sign up for the summit…

Little snippets/notes from listening to Margaret Wehrenberg which I found particularly interesting and helpful…

She spoke on “The Purpose of Worry and How to Manage It” .  Under this banner highlights for me personally were…

how fear and worry are different…

why do we worry? anxiety is a normal condition. it is they way we feel in response to ambiguity.  sensation of anxiety gives us some motivation to look for and identify potential problems and look for them but with a disorder we feel anxiety in the absence of any actual threat or problem…  get into “what if” thinking and worry becomes persistent, disruptive, and robs people of the joy of being alive.

fear and worry distinguished…if there is a distinct threat, basically  something which has an objective observable cause… that is fear and it prompts action, look for a way to escape from what it is that scares us, we can imagine that we would be afraid…that is not the same as worry… worry is persistent however it  never solves a problem where as fear can solve a problem

some people are wired up to be worriers more than others and have not very effective stopping mechanisms or brain shifting capacity… lots of her techniques attempt to equip the person to shift gears manually, and eventually this becomes more automatic with repetition using brain to change the brain.

stress creates conditions of anxiety as an outcome of stress…  so stress reduction is key.    ie body care sleep eat,    causes people to feel generally uneasy..  thinking what could be going wrong…

anxiety is a condition looking for content… asking all the time what could be causing me to have this kind of arousal?  seeking relief, ie with health anxiety..  internet searching!!!    scanning for health concerns.. looking up symptoms and trying to diagnose themselves, does not typically help. Calmness while searching, act of reassurance in seeking, and while online person may feel calm,  but better to respond to the feeling of a needing some reassurance through other ways not internet searching…

people believe if is it is possible to happen then it is probably going to happen….start to behave as if it is going to happen or is even happening right now. But it may only be remotely possible.  Are you worrying about something which is possible or probable? 

do you have a real problem, if so you can plan a way to solve it… so planning is a good tool a real antidote to worry

if you cannot make a plan then it is not a real problem, or at least not yet, so then worry is the problem itself.

 

Well, the above is a little taster.  Excuse the note form.  As said, I use this Journal not as a finished piece of personal narrative, but as an unfolding notebook/journal/record, for my own use as much as sharing it with any interested parties.   If you would like to find out more about Margaret’s work she has a website:  http://www.margaretwehrenberg.com/   The two books I have read by Margaret Wehrenberg are “The 10 Best-Ever Depression Management Techniques: Understanding How Your Brain Makes You Depressed & What You Can Do to Change it” and “The 10 Best-Ever Anxiety Management Techniques: Understanding How Your Brain Makes You Anxious and What You Can Do to Change it”.

I liked very much the writing style of the books as well as the content and organisation.  I read  “The 10 Best-Ever Depression Management Techniques: Understanding How Your Brain Makes You Depressed”  when I was very depressed several years ago, and found the tone very helpful, as not patronising.   I had a pre existing interest in the neuroscience, due to my brother’s head injury, and I found the matter of fact approach, with reference to how the brain works,  good for me personally.  Also, being someone possessing sound intelligence and being of a practical nature, enjoying concrete and material things, as well as theory,  I was glad to find something which suggested that I could manage what was happening to me and that I had some kind of influence over it.  This is always a big step when feeling depressed, however it is a crucial one.  There were so many small and accessible things suggested that one could do.  This was just what I needed.  I never had an expectation of quick and easy answers, and was looking around to access psychotherapy at the time, but as I was unable to access it for six months  I needed something to help me manage things in the meantime. It might not suit everyone, but was perfect for me.

There were plenty of other speakers also. I don’t have the inclination to share any more here, but one of the little bits of information I picked up from another talk was with regard to a term “Window of Tolerance”. “Window of Tolerance” is a term coined by Dr. Dan Siegel, and is now widely used in understanding normal brain/physiology reaction responses, as well in trauma-informed treatment terminology, and in all areas of mental health. Efforts are made to assist individuals to learn how to widen their personal, unique Window of Tolerance, as well as to have methods to stay in the Window of Tolerance via self-soothing and self-regulating behaviours. When an individual “jumps” out, or feels “pushed” out of their Window of Tolerance on the upper or lower sides, the prefrontal cortex is essentially going offline, with only subcortical brain regions (limbic system-emotional brain, and brain stem) staying active, removing ability to think through actions and consequences. Before any type of talking or making sense of a situation can occur, individuals need to find a way back into their Window of Tolerance, through self-soothing and self-regulating behaviours, which will allow all regions of the brain to get back online, and our processing system to function appropriately.

Mmm, as you can see.  I am really into this!

quoted from:  http://www.drmariedezelic.com/window-of-tolerance–traumaanxiety-rela

I found this terribly interesting.  Not quite sure what I will do with it, if anything right at the moment, but wanting to record it here in the Journal so that I will at some point look over it again, and it won’t just disappear in the computer without memory!

This is such a psychological post in the Journal…  I am also interested in numbing!

Numbing is a biological process whereby emotions are detached from thoughts, behaviours, and memories. As I look back into the significant period of depression I experienced, which was over the period  from about 2010 to 2012,  I am aware very much that the numbing I experienced was a traumatic stress reaction, and one which hid what was going on inside emotionally.  It is this, and the feeling of separation from others, because of the emotional disconnect, which makes it all the more distressing.  The impact of trauma is felt very greatly by the person, but is not very easy for others to recognise, because the emotionless-ness hides the distress and masks the levels of stress experienced.   It is efficiently kept to oneself. But it is a sad isolation. Alcohol to self-medicate does not help either.  You cannot deny your emotions on a long term basis.

A Brief Writing on It…

The detachment

The feeling of the

need

to connect

The gap, which imperceptibly widens

The falling apart, within, without

The without-ness growing like a huge plant

Which sucks the water from the soul

This is the abyss in which I have fallen.

 

It’s a long time since I have written any poetry.  Must do some this Winter.  And must put some visual content in this post… I have been doing a lot of research recently and very little painting.  The painting below dates from between 2007 and 2012… (around 2010 I think).  Certainly carried out during those “wilderness years”.  Didn’t like it at the time, but I like it now.

sketch of chessington rear access road jenny meehan

sketch of chessington rear access road jenny meehan

 

Love working abstractly… So interesting.  But great to have something there to bounce off too!

Determined to do some painting, despite the obstacles in the way, the pain, the slowness of walking, the mounting of domestic tasks, the knowledge that as I stand to paint, the end result will be I cannot stand at all in the evening. I must instead tend to my knee with ice, massage, heat, and whatever else I fancy.   Going out to network is out of the question.  I do not anticipate pain coming to me… I am using mindfulness to good effect, however it seems doggedly faithful. And arrives an uninvited guest.  What I will achieve in the future, with this situation of disability is a matter of concern to me, even while taking one day at a time.  So I look back and enjoy what I have done.  I will do more…It just looks like it will be more difficult.  Knee replacement at some point.  Often feel unsure of how long I can keep this up.

Posting Recent List of Exhibitions..

Here is what I have done so far in the way  of exhibitions.  Just skim down quickly if they are not of interest!  Just need to remind myself of what I have done at the moment!

Exhibitions List Up to Date. To October 2016

Imagined Worlds Exhibition – A touring exhibition of artworks inspired by the poem ‘Kubla Khan’ written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1816. This is a celebration by the Friends of Coleridge supported by Somerset Art Works, working in partnership with the National Trust, CICCIC Taunton, and Art at the Heart, RUH Bath.

CICCIC Memorial Hall, Paul St, Taunton TA1 3PF 7 October -12 November 2016 . Special PV 21 October 2016

Mid November – January tbc, RUH Bath Mid January – Mid April 2017, Coleridge Cottage Nether Stowey Mid April – May 2017
“The Art of Caring” ( second exhibition curated by Peter Herbert) at The Conference Centre, St Pancras Hospital, NW1 OPE 21st July – 13th October 2016
KAOS OPEN STUDIOS 11th / 12th and 18th / 19th June 2016 (Kingston Artists’ Open Studios)70 artists taking part at venues around Kingston. Annual event.
Kingston Artists’ Open Studios Taster Exhibition at Cass Art , 103 Clarence Street, KT1 1 QY in “The Art Space” Kingston Upon Thames. 6th – 20th June 2016
“Anagrams” at Kingston Museum, Kingston Art 2016. Juried. Wheatfield Way, Kingston upon Thames, KT1 2PS. 29 April 2016 to 2 July 2016

“Building Bridges, the Female Perspective” 8th March – October 2016 organised by Southwark Arts Forum & Tower Bridge Art at the Bridge #7. Tower Bridge Victorian Engine Rooms, Tower Bridge Road London SE1 2UP.

“The Art of Caring” Exhibition curated by Alban Low at The Upper Circle Gallery, The Rose Theatre, Kingston-upon-Thames 12th to 24th May 2016.

2015

CornerHouse Charity Exhibition for “Straight Talking Charity at Cornerhouse Arts Centre, Surbiton, Surrey Nov 30th – Dec 31st

Challenging Behaviour Foundation Charity Exhibition Sun Pier House, Sun Pier, Medway Street, Chatham, Kent, ME4 4HF 3 November 2015 – 29 November 2015

Court Farm Cafe Group Exhibition, organised by Kingston Arts Cafe at Court Farm Garden Centre, Worcester Park, Surrey KT4 7QH October 2015 – January 2016

A Letter in Mind – The Art of Journey, Charity Exhibition at Gallery@oxo, South Bank, London SE1 9PH 8th October until 18th October 2015. My donated work sold for this worthy cause.

Brighton Sussex University Hospitals Trust National Transplant Week 2015 (7th-13th September) public art exhibition in Brighton UK at the Brighton Jubilee Library Jubilee St, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 1GE. Items 13 and 14 were my donations.

Jenny Meehan’s donation can be found on page 10 of the following publication:

To bid, go to the Ebay store, here’s the facebook link:

‘The Story So Far’, organised by Acton Arts Forum, at W3 Gallery, 185 Acton High Street, W3 9DJ . From 1 July to 14th July 2015.

KAOS (Kingston Artists’ Open Studios “Selfie” Exhibition in The Art Space at Cass Arts, Kingston Upon Thames. 6 – 14th June

KAOS OPEN STUDIOS June 2015 (Kingston Artists’ Open Studios) at venues around Kingston. Annual event.
“Flying Colours” Joint exhibition of prints, Leatherhead Theatre, Leatherhead (Jenny Meehan and Chris Birch) 3rd – 30th May 2015

“Day of Reflection on Spiritual Homelessness” at St Nicholas Church, Guildford GU2 4AW on 11th April 2015. Six paintings shown as part of a group exhibition.

“Tiny Bones and Lasting Stones of Memory” (poem and painting) shown as part of Holocaust Memorial Day – Keeping the Memory Alive Through Art Exhibition: Kingston University, 16th – 17th March; Kingston Museum, 26 March – 23 April 2015, Kingston College, 24th – 28th April 2015 and at the Council Chambers, Kingston Upon Thames 1st February (Third prize in adult category)

2014 Exhibitions

Holocaust Memorial Day – Keeping the Memory Alive Through Art Exhibition at the Council Chambers, Kingston Upon Thames, Sunday 1st February (Third prize in adult category)

KAOS Exhibition at All Saints Church, Kingston upon Thames
KT1 1JP 11th Nov – 25th Nov. Kingston Artist’s Open Studios Group Exhibition

“Breaking the Chains” (Anti human trafficking) Exhibition at Tower Gallery, Memorial Community Church, 395 Barking Road, London E13 8AL. 16th October – 6th November. Selected

“A Letter in Mind”…The National Brain Appeal’s Exhibition Charity Exhibition) at gallery@oxo, Oxo Tower Wharf, Bargehouse Street, South Bank, London, SE1 9PH. 2nd October – 5th October. Selected and donated work sold.

Dulwich Picture Gallery Open Exhibition, Gallery Road, London SE21 7AD 30th Sept – 12th Oct 2015. Juried, (Selection panel headed by Ian Dejardin, and including Rebecca Fortnum, Clive Head, Nicky Hirst and Elo Schuneman).

NewArt@Baker Tilly, Baker Tilly, 3rd Floor, One London Square, Cross Lanes Guildford GU1 1UN 7th June -20th September. Selected

Court Farm KAOS (Kingston Artists’ Open Studios) Cafe at Court Farm Garden Centre, Worcester Park, Surrey. 3rd May – 27th July

Multiple Sclerosis Trust “The Secret Art Show” (Charity Exhibition) Spirella Building, Bridge Road, Letchwoth Garden City, Hertfordshire SG6 4ET. 30th April – 7th May

Artistsmeet Open Exhibition, Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire WD3 1EH. 3rd March – 6th May 2014 Selected.

“Drawn Together” Riverside Gallery, Old Town Hall, Richmond Upon Thames TW9 1TP. 1st March – 25th May 2014 Juried.

“Sacred Spaces” KAOS Exhibition curated by Jenny Meehan, Leatherhead Theatre, Leatherhead. May 3 – 31st 2014. Seven members of Kingston Artists’ Open Studios.

“Speaking Out – Women Recovering from the Trauma of Violence” Embrace Arts at the RA Centre, Leciester University, Leciester. 13 January – 28th March 2014. Juried.

“Drawing Inspiration” Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, A-Side B-Side Gallery, Hackney Downs Studios, E8 2BT. 23rd Jan – 3rd Feb 2014 Highly Commended awarded. Juried.

“Recovery” Exhibition – Institute Of Mental Health/City Arts at Nottingham University NG7 2TU Nov 6th – May 2014

2013 Exhibitions

“Recovery” Exhibition – Institute Of Mental Health/City Arts at Nottingham University NG7 2TU Nov 6th – May 2014

Brixton Drawing Project Exhibition. Brixton East, Brixton, SW9 Sunday 6th October.

Orange Tree Theatre KAOS Group Exhibition. Orange Tree Theatre, Richmond upon Thames, Surrey 23rd Oct – 30th Nov.

PARTIA “Collective Nostalgia” at Aintree University Hospital, Liverpool. 1st Oct-1st Nov 2013. Selected.

Court Farm KAOS (Kingston Artist’s Open Studios) Group Exhibition. Cafe at Court Farm Garden Centre, Worcester Park, Surrey. Sept 3rd – November 2013

“Not The Royal Academy” exhibition at Llewellyn Alexander Fine Paintings. London SE1 June – August

“Allotted” Curated Exhibition at The Beetroot Tree Gallery, Draycott, Derbyshire 15th June – 27th July 2013 Selected.

“Lines” Curated Exhibition at The Strand Gallery, London. Selected. June 2013

Cornerhouse Arts Centre, Surbiton, Surrey. Jenny Meehan Recent Work, Solo Exhibition. June 2013

Group Exhibition “Order and KAOS” (Four Painters from Kingston Artists Open Studios). Leatherhead Theatre (curated by Jenny Meehan) 4th-31st May.

Dugout Women’s Inclusive Festival – The Hoxton Arches, Cremer Street, E2 8HD (2nd March 2013). Juried.

Open Exhibition at The Classroom Gallery, Nottingham. Selected. March 23 – April 5th.

National Open Exhibition 2013 at Electric Picture House Congleton, Cheshire. March 9th -30th. Selected.

2012
September – December Alliance Healthcare Exhibition, Alliance Healthcare, Chessington Surrey (SOLO)

The Bog Standard Gallery, Artistsmeet, Watersmeet, Rickmansworth Hertfordshire. WD3 1EH December 2012

The Ark Centre Autumn Exhibition, Basingstoke, Hampshire RG24 9NN. October/November 2012

Artistsmeet Open Exhibition, Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire WD3 1EH. September/October 2012

Cranleigh Arts Centre Open Exhibition, Cranleigh, Surrey GU6 8AS June 2012

“Some Kind Of Narrative” Joint Exhibition at Leatherhead Theatre, Leatherhead, Surrey KT22 8DN Stephanie Greenslade – Jenny Meehan. 29th April – 25th May 2012. ”

Hidden Artists” Exhibition at Denbies Picture Gallery 2012, Denbies Wine Estate, Charity fundraising event for NSPCC.

2011
Jigsaw4Uinternational.org project “Strong Voices” Event 2011 at The Rose Theatre, Kingston Upon Thames in October. (sculpture and photographs). Charity event.

Cranleigh Arts Centre Open Exhibition 2011 at Cranleigh Arts Centre, Cranleigh, Surrey GU6 8AS June 2011 Juried Exhibition

“Hidden Artists” Exhibition at Denbies Picture Gallery 2011, Denbies Wine Estate, Dorking, Surrey. Fundraising exhibition for NSPCC.

2010
“John Lewis Prize” Exhibition (of shortlisted work) at “The Place To Eat”, John Lewis, Kingston Upon Thames. 8th September – 10th December 2010 Juried Exhibition

Pallant House Gallery/St Wilfrid’s Hospice Open Art Exhibition at Pallant House Gallery, Chichester, West Sussex. 3rd June – 2nd July 2010. Juried Exhibition.

Surrey Artists Network Ist Anniversary Exhibition at Otters Pool Studio, Guildford, Surrey GU1 4QG Ist May – 22nd May 2010. Juried Exhibition.

Denbies Open Exhibition 2010 Denbies Vineyard, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6AA January 7th-17th, 2010.

2009
“Doorway” Visual Meditation 2009 (Jenny Meehan and Mary Reid) at St Paul’s C of E Church, Hook, Surrey. February 22nd.

2008 – 2006

Kingston Contemporary Open 2007 (Stanley Picker Gallery, Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey, UK). Juried.

Kingston Contemporary Open 2006 (Stanley Picker Galllery, Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey, UK). Juried.

SOLO EXHIBITIONS (Self Organised in Community Spaces)

” Jenny Meehan -Recent Paintings and Prints” Cornerhouse Arts Centre, Surbiton Surrey June 2013

“Paintings – Jenny Meehan ” Alliance Healthcare, Chessington, Surrey Sept-Dec 2012

“Inking Outside The Block” (CornerHOUSE Arts Centre, Surbiton) December 5th to December 31st 2011.
PRIZES/AWARDS

Painting and Poetry – Third Prize in “Keeping the Memory Alive through Art”, Kingston Inter Faith Forum, Kingston University, Kingston Upon Thames February 2015

Painting – Highly Commended – Needhams Open Art Competition 2009, Cambridgeshire, UK. Juried Exhibition.

Poetry – Finalist (second place) in “Literary Mary” poetry competition March 2009

Painting – Highly Commended – “Drawing Inspiration” Competition Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, January 2014

QUALIFICATIONS

BA Hons English Literature (Kingston University, Kingston Upon Thames)

PGCE Primary Education (Roehampton Institute, Roehampton)

COLLECTIONS

Kingston Museum

John Lewis Partnership

Bog Standard Gallery

Private collections in the United Kingdom

 

This is getting to be a rather long post… As often happens…

Walter Darby Bannard, 1934-2016

A lovely write here:

http://www.artblog.net/post/2016/10/walter-darby-bannard/

Notes from the Life of an Artist by Franklin Einspruch, an artist and writer based in Boston.

Sometimes I am caught by what I read, and this part caught me:

I’ll let you in on a secret: the scorn never mattered. Darby lived well. His was a life full of brilliant friends, talented colleagues, and passionate relationships. Throughout it all and up to the end, he painted. When he was painting, canvases tacked to the floor, surrounded by jars of acrylics, and an arsenal of squeegees, brooms, and brushes at the ready, his enjoyment was unassailable. Art rides in on pleasure, he says in the Aphorisms.

The pleasure carries something with it, something very precious to us that is inseparable from the pleasure itself.

I live with that something every day, but I can’t say what it is. No one can. If you have an eye, you comprehend it in an instant; you feel it and you know it. That’s that.

And now that really is that.”

The above quoted from:  http://www.artblog.net/post/2016/10/walter-darby-bannard/   Do take a look and read the whole post.

There is such a lot of distraction.  But I will certainly be taking a look at http://wdbannard.org/ and reading some more!

Researching Family History

I have dug around a bit. Stumbled on this:

Some of my family history

While not possible to trace much of my mother’s side due to lack of information,  I was grateful to find this recently:

Born in Boscombe, Hampshire in 1882, Albert was the son of blacksmith, Colin Gray and his wife Selina. He had an older brother, Colin Bertie and a younger sister, Laura. In 1891 the family were living in Victoria Road, Pokesdown, where they also took in a lodger. They later moved to Hannington Road, Bournemouth. By 1901 Albert’s brother was working as a decorator, whilst his sister was employed as a laundress and later as a dye cleaner in the textile industry.

Albert seems to have followed a similar career path to his sister. By the age of 29 he was a wash house foreman, in a local laundry. This is probably where he met his future bride, Gertrude Harradine. The daughter of a railwayman, she was originally from 104 Palmerston Road, Wimbledon but was boarding in Bournemouth, having found work as a laundress. The couple married at Holy Trinity Church, Wimbledon on 3 August, 1912.

During the war, Albert joined the Royal Field Artillery. He served with the 189th Brigade, part of the 41st Division. This was formed in Aldershot in 1915 from units raised in southern England. Comprising 3 – 4 gun batteries, the brigade was sent to France in May 1916 and was initially based in the area between Hazebrouck and Bailleul. As field artillery for the 1st Army, Albert and his comrades would have fought in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. During this week-long offensive in September 1916, artillery and infantry tried, but failed to break the German line and leave an opening for cavalry attacks. In November the 189th brigade was also involved in the Battle of the Transloy Ridge, part of the third and final offensive of the Somme campaign. Fighting was made all the more harrowing by terrible weather conditions and a battlefield devastated by months of artillery fire.

Promoted to the rank of sergeant, Albert must have shown bravery and determination during his military service, as he was mentioned in dispatches. He survived the war, albeit briefly and died of influenza on 25 November 1918, just two weeks after peace was declared. He was buried at Gap Road Cemetery and is commemorated at Wimbledon Parish Church. His widow continued to live at 28a Wycliffe Road, Wimbledon, after his death.

That widow was my father, Gordon William Gray’s mother. I never met her, as they were estranged.  I don’t know why as it was not talked about.  My maiden name of Gray, yet another interesting journey of discovery!

I had gleaned some of the information myself, but this extract above, which I quote from http://cis.photoarchive.merton.gov.uk/entity/186931-serjeant-albert-william-gray..   contains much more detail than I had been able to obtain on my own.

That’s it, for now!!!!

 

TO FOLLOW THIS ARTIST’S BLOG SIMPLY GO TO THE RIGHT HAND COLUMN, LOCATE THE  “FOLLOW” BOX AND POP IN YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS.  YOU WILL THEN RECEIVE MONTHLY UPDATES.

 

Jenny Meehan is a painter, poet, and Christian contemplative  based in East Surrey/South West London.   Her interest in Christ-centred spirituality and creativity are the main focus of this artist’s journal, which rambles and meanders on, maybe acting as a personal (yet open to view)  note book as much as anything else.  If you read and enjoy it, this would be an added bonus! 

Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also occasionally offers art tuition for individuals or in shared sessions.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details as availability depends on other commitments.    

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings and other artwork forms  and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.  

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom.   To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s  bi-annual  mailing list please contact Jenny via her website contact page:  www.jamartlondon.com

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

 

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

A selection of non objective paintings can be viewed on pinterest:   https://uk.pinterest.com/Jamartlondon/

My prints and some merchandise which uses my artwork can also be purchased safely and easily through Redbubble.com

http://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams?ref=artist_title_name

 

 

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION

All content on this blog,  unless specified otherwise,  is © Jenny Meehan.  Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts of writing and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jenny Meehan with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  Images may not be used without permission under any circumstances. 

Copyright and Licensing Digital Images Information – Jenny Meehan

www.jamartlondon.com

Copyright in all images by Jenny Meehan is held by the artist.
Permission must be sought in advance for the reproduction, copying or any other use of any images by Jenny Meehan. Individuals or businesses seeking licenses or permission to use, copy or reproduce any image by Jenny Meehan should, in the first instance, contact Jenny Meehan.

Copyright for all visual art by Jenny Meehan is managed by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) in the UK. If you wish to licence a work of art by Jenny Meehan, please contact Jenny Meehan in the first instance to clarify your requirements. There is a contact form on my website www.jamartlondon.com

Licensing an image is quick and easy for both parties and is organised through the Design and Artist Copyright Society. (Note, my images are not shown on the “Art image” selection on the Design and Artist Copyright “Art Image” page. This does NOT mean you cannot apply for a license to use an image of my work from DACS… They simply have a very limited sample selection of work in their “Artimage” page!)

 

 

I cannot believe we are into November…!

Enjoying the frost on the cobwebs, and the colours of the leaves which have fallen.

The studio tent is a bit too cold to use very much, though I am popping in and out of it to work on paintings already started.  I need to spend some time sorting out frames for the paintings carried out earlier in the year.

I can walk without a stick now for longer periods of time, though rather sad that my walking is not as it was.  I am exercising more and feeling healthier.  Loving Yoga and swimming more.  Turmeric tea each day.  Much improved from last month, and only very occasional pain from the osteoarthritis in my knee.

 

Artwork Sold for Charity! A Letter in Mind – The Art of Journey, Gallery@oxo  

I am very pleased that when I visited the Gallery the day after the private view (which I couldn’t make) my artwork contribution was sold!  I am very pleased as this has raised some money for a worthy cause!

 

The Challenging Behaviour Foundation Art Auction

I have some artwork on display at Sun Pier House, Chatham, Kent from 3rd November until 29th November as part of a fund raising art exhibition for The Challenging Behaviour Foundation. The Challenging Behaviour Foundation is a Medway based charity supporting families caring for a loved one with a severe learning disability whose behaviour challenges.

http://www.challengingbehaviour.org.uk/

Artists were invited to submit work for this fundraising exhibition at Sun Pier House, Chatham, Kent, a few months back.

Unfortunately I cannot get to the Private View due to financial restrictions.  Travelling money for such things all adds up and I find I can only attend local or London based events. Here’s more information though:

“You are cordially invited to the Private View of the Challenging Behaviour Foundation’s fundraising art exhibition on Friday 6 November, 6pm-9pm.

We have received an overwhelming response to our ‘call for submissions’ and are happy to confirm, Contemporary Artist and recent Saatchi exhibitor, Darrell Hawkins, will also be submitting work for this exhibition.

There will be a programme of events running throughout the month-long exhibition, including:

Friday 6 November, 6pm-9pm
Private View

Tuesday 10 November, 6.30pm
Film screening of a ‘Mission to Lars’ with pre-show karaoke, courtesy of the Rochester Film Society

Friday 20 November, 7.30pm
Quiz Night – *tables available

Sunday 29 November, 2pm
Auction of artwork

We are incredibly grateful to every individual who has taken part in this show and would like to thank the following local businesses for their support of this event:

· Sun Pier House Gallery
· The Rochester Film Society
· Spicer and Moore Productions
· The Rochester Flea
· WoW Magazine
· Look Kloser Creative and Performing Arts
· University of Kent
· University for the Creative Arts
· Medway Messenger

Please feel free to share the news of these events with your friends, family and colleagues and please do email me for further information on any of the listed events.

With best wishes and thank you for your support,

Laura

Laura Brown
Fundraising Officer
The Challenging Behaviour Foundation
http://www.challengingbehaviour.org.uk”

I entered this piece which I hope will raise some money for this worthwhile cause:

 

“My Patch”

my patch canvas print jenny meehan websize

my patch canvas print jenny meehan websize

it is a 39 by 51 cm canvas print, varnished.

Here’s the text for it:

“My Patch/Face On” expresses that focused determination that people need when they confront difficult situations and face challenges in their lives. I very much enjoy experimenting with black and white graphic imagery, and in this piece the boundaries between the black and white areas suggested the ways in which conflict is sometimes a territorial matter, springing from our felt need to defend ourselves. There are aspects of us all, it seems, which are not so different from cats!

Jenny Meehan Biography
Human experience, emotion, and my own personal life journey form the centre of my work. The brokenness of human experience fascinates me, as well as the potential for growth and renewal. After a BA Honours (Literature) in 1994 and a PGCE in 1995 I taught in Primary Education. I’m now based in Chessington, Surrey and love my role in society as an artist, mother, and occasional art teacher. I would describe myself as a vocational artist, interested in psychology, spirituality, and emotional literacy.
I’ve had several solo exhibitions in community spaces, and exhibit widely across the UK. Painting, digital Imagery, writing and poetry make up the majority of my artistic practice, and you can see more of my work on my website: http://www.jamartlondon.com .

 

 

Thoughts on  Transformation

Transformation. Yes, the forming. The making of. I think of it in a positive way, as being a change from worse off to better, but I suppose it could equally be the other way around. My own understanding and way of approaching the word is centered around my own experience of the way faith can work in peoples lives, I think this is because my own personal faith/belief has been a source of great energy and power to me, however, I wouldn’t narrow this down to my own particular religious affiliation/understanding. I see transformation as related to potential, and to potency. Like the uncurled fern frond, or the bud about to open, it is a kind of positive expectancy of new life in my thinking. It is something I perceive as essential to creativity, maybe the essence of it? It is what we do when we take one thing, and see something else, something beyond that. So that is where the faith and vision come into play. Quite literally. Transformation has a sense of control, but also a sense of the unexpected. There is a natural process which happens, which guides and takes through, but the final form is completely different maybe to what we thought it would be. My life is a transformation, I cannot really narrow this down.

 

Oxshott Woods

One of my favourite places to walk is Oxshott Woods.   We used to go there every Sunday when I was a child, and its lovely to walk in the same places I did then, all these years later.  Here is a photo of my husband walking in the slightly snowy woods.

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

 

And one of the children, when they were younger:

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

 

A little bit more snow here; This snowy view of Chessington shows the Holmwood Road bus stop, and was taken when the White Hart pub still existed!

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

 

Interesting Reading:  

Another Benedictine, John Chapman, who was abbot of Downside in the Thirties, says: “The simplest way of making an act of attention to God, though without thinking of God, is by an act of inattention to everything else.” It is that letting go of our attachment to our thoughts and feelings, everything else, that is the essence of contemplative prayer. This is what it means to lose your life in order to find it, as Jesus says we should do: it is to let go of the controlling ego that likes to be at the centre in order to know our true centre, the Spirit of God within. And then nothing else is needed. At least for the time of prayer we hand everything over to God.

quote from Fr Robin Burgess is a member of parish team of Ealing Abbey, west London from article Leave behind words and enter God’s stillness
Keywords: Christian Prayer, Spiritual Practice,Meditation, Christian Mysticism, Spirituality, Christian Meditation, Catholic Spirituality, Prayer, Contemplative Prayer, State, Mysticism, Mental Prayer, Religion / Belief
in the catholic herald 23RD OCTOBER 2009

We all begin by thinking of prayer as words, or maybe thoughts, that we address to God. It is my prayer – my words, my desires, my needs that I lay before God and ask him to meet for me. Much of our worship and the prayers we say continue to be like that, but if prayer stays at that level it remains selfcentred (not necessarily in a bad way). It may never become what all the great teachers say prayer is – not what we do, but the Spirit of God, of Christ, praying within us. It is the Spirit of God poured into our hearts, as St Paul says, that prays when we do not know how to pray with sighs too deep for words. This Spirit cries out, as Jesus does, abba (Father), and so enables us to know ourselves to be in the same relationship of loving intimacy with God as Jesus is.
To be a Christian is not so much a matter of believing certain things or behaving in certain ways. It includes those, but it is more basically a matter of being – of being in Christ who is our Way to the Father. So Christian prayer will be not our prayer, but our sharing in the prayer of Christ who knows himself to be in God and God in him. It is this prayer of presence to God present to us that is called contemplation, or pure prayer (or prayer of the heart).

 

More Photos…

I am sorting through past images, as I hope to use some to create a book with some of my poetry and photographic imagery in…This will come together in the future, but the groundwork involves sorting through several years of clicking away with my camera!

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

 

The image above was taken in West Dean College/House gardens.  The river is the River Lavant.  I love to see a thoughtfully composed garden, it is such a pleasure to see the living and vibrant natural forms working together.  I take great pleasure in my own garden also, though I have neglected it rather in the last couple of years.  However, even though slightly neglected, the structure is in place in such a way that it still falls together rather nicely!

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

jenny meehan jamartlondon photography monochrome

Another restful image taken in West Dean Gardens, Sussex.  The River Lavant again, with an inviting bench to sit on!

 

Paintings

A few from the past, with some information/text.

All of the paintings here are the result of my own constant efforts to push forward creatively into the unknown. They are part of a contemplative practice which involves listening with the heart, and opening myself up to the Holy Spirit. Though I use years of experience gleaned in my practice as a painter (in terms of integrating formal aesthetic considerations and use of materials) each painting is always a step into the unknown.
Each painting is created in a piecemeal fashion, with sometimes several weeks and months between painting sessions, and sometimes even a day or two between each brush mark. During the time I am not applying the paint, I look to the painting and ask “What next?” Without any predetermined plan or concept, and with only my response to the mark which has gone before it, the painting becomes whatever it becomes. This process involves risk taking, and paintings change significantly as they progress, sometimes descending into a slough of despond, and sometimes bringing a completely unexpected direction into play and opening up in surprising ways. Towards the end of the painting process I find possible ideas present themselves, as I attempt to interpret what the painting means to myself, which is partially reflected in the title. You title will be your own.
For you, the viewer, a lot is required in encountering paintings which don’t clearly dictate how you should approach them. Without pictorial content to place you in the familiar material world and without a narrative, some might find themselves struggling to engage with such abstraction. Yet, it is enough just to look, and to look at what is before you, without needing to understand anything at all. The light changes these paintings as the day progresses. The light bounces off the variations in surface and texture, and the types of finishes and varnishes. The paintings are different in the morning, and different at the end of the day. They will be different to each person. Allow yourself the time to simply gaze.

Surrey/South West London based artist Jenny Meehan painter-poet
http://www.jamartlondon.com

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images, pillar and moon transcript paul nash

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

Above “Pillar and Moon”….  This is based on a memory of Paul Nash’s painting “Pillar and Moon”  which made a deep impression on me.  I like many paintings by Paul Nash, but that particular one seems to haunt me.

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

Rocks by the Seaside, with some looking out to the sea…maybe those three finger prints like people, this is what emerged through this painting process.  I think some very happy memories from childhood come to bless me again… The happy ones did come from times by the coast, both at Bexhill and Combe Martin.  This painting I therefore titled “Cove”.

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

“Time Passes” This painting seems to have both present and past echoing through it…My walks through the rear access roads of Chessington and the playing in the alleys which ran along the backs of the houses where I lived in Teddington… Both are here in this painting, and past and present exist together.

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

“Baptism”

 

If you would like to see these paintings and are interested in buying one, do contact me through the contact form on my website.

 

That’s it for now…!

……………………………………………………………………………………….

TO FOLLOW THIS ARTIST’S BLOG SIMPLY GO TO THE RIGHT HAND COLUMN, LOCATE THE  “FOLLOW” BOX AND POP IN YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS.  YOU WILL THEN RECEIVE MONTHLY UPDATES. 

Jenny Meehan is a painter, poet, and Christian contemplative  based in East Surrey/South West London.   Her interest in Christ-centred spirituality and creativity are the main focus of this artist’s journal, which rambles and meanders on, maybe acting as a personal (yet open to view)  note book as much as anything else.  If you read and enjoy it, this would be an added bonus! 

Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also occasionally offers art tuition for individuals or in shared sessions.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details as availability depends on other commitments.    

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings and other artwork forms  and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.  

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom.   To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s  bi-annual  mailing list please contact Jenny via her website contact page:  www.jamartlondon.com

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

TO FOLLOW THIS ARTIST’S BLOG SIMPLY GO TO THE RIGHT HAND COLUMN, LOCATE THE  “FOLLOW” BOX AND POP IN YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS.  YOU WILL THEN RECEIVE MONTHLY UPDATES. 

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting

by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION

Copyright in all images by Jenny Meehan is held by the artist.
Permission must be sought in advance if you wish to use images by Jenny Meehan. In the first instance, please contact Jenny Meehan. Copyright for all works of art by Jenny Meehan is managed by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) in the UK.

If you wish to licence a work of art by Jenny Meehan, please contact DACS as indicated below:
Design and Artist Copyright Society
33 Old Bethnal Green Road

London E2 6A3A
Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7336 8811

Fax: +44 (0) 20 7336 8822
email: info@dacs.org.uk
website: http://www.dacs.org.uk
Offices are open 0930 – 1700 Monday through Friday.

 

 

Ben  Nicholson – Winifred Nicholson – Christopher Wood – Alfred Wallis – William Staite Murray – “Art and Life 1920 – 1931 – 4th June – 21st September

As I have recently joined as a friend of Dulwich Picture Gallery I duly received my invitation to the Private View of “Art and Life 1920 – 1931” and made my  first trip to Dulwich Picture Gallery on the 9th June.  It was a very nice visit, but as I don’t drink alcohol, I was disappointed with the soft drinks option being water, and that was that.  Need to email them and request Teetotallers are better catered for I think.  It was a day of sun, and green.

You were not allowed to take photographs of the paintings.  Oh, so sad.  No sense.  It would have been handy for reference.  But I will remember the colour, and the poetry, particularly of Winifred Nicholson’s paintings, which I liked the most.

I have long admired the paintings of both Ben and Winifred Nicholson, but also very much loved the paintings of William Nicholson… but his were not to be seen… I am certain they must have had an effect on Winifred, in particular.   I spent some time when at West Dean a few years ago enjoying “The Art of William Nicholson: British Painter and Printmaker – by Colin Campbell, Merlin James” which was published in 2004 by the Royal Academy of Arts.  I would buy this book but unfortunately it is rather costly at £85!

Info on William Nicholson below, taken from the above website. He was born 1872 and died 1949.    Text credit included below.

  • British painter, printmaker, and designer. He briefly attended Herkomer’s school in Bushey, then studied at the Académie Julian, Paris. Early in his career he worked mainly as a printmaker and designer, notably on some brilliant poster designs in the 1890s, done in collaboration with his brother-in-law James Pryde under the name ‘J. & W. Beggarstaff’.

Text Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists (Oxford University Press)

“Nicholson, Sir William” The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists. Ed Ian Chilvers. Oxford University Press 2009 Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press.

I’ve just been looking at an image of this painting, and it has left me quite speechless… It is the emotional dimension and poetry of the painting which I love…each mark is tender and full of freshness and life.  There is no need for moving images with paintings like this to see.  The movement happens internally, and the spirit stirs at the sight, not of the illusion, for the picture is simply a vehicle, but because of the expression, which not only depicts an external scene, but traces the heart movements of the painter at the same time.

 

paintings influencing jenny meehan, A Glade Near Midhurst by William Nicholson(c) Elizabeth Banks; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

A Glade Near Midhurst by William Nicholson(c) Elizabeth Banks; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

I include this image with credit to The Public Catalogue Foundation.  A Glade Near Midhurst by William Nicholson is copyright Elizabeth Banks.

See my text on my usage of this image*

I just love it.  It makes me want to paint immediately!   I feel a bit lost right now with respect to my painting, but mostly because all the domestic things which need doing are running off with my time in their hands.  Once I am doing it, all will be well.  Painting doesn’t seem like a problem when I am doing it, only when I am not!  Maybe the best problem to have then, better than the other way around.

In the Dulwich Picture Gallery it was Winifred Nicholson’s paintings which caught my interest and provided the most enjoyment.

Winifred Nicholson, Summer1928. copyright The Trustees of Winifred Nicholson

Winifred Nicholson, Summer1928.
copyright The Trustees of Winifred Nicholson

Winifred Nicholson, Summer1928.
copyright The Trustees of Winifred Nicholson. See my copyright note*(tried to email, no success)

Winifred Nicholson  “Summer1928”  was just one of many examples with the surface of the canvas utilised in that wonderful way which brings a softness to the brightest colours.   It is the feeling, so direct, so personal, that comes across.  This is not painting for anyone else but herself.  This is the best way.

“Nicholson particularly enjoyed painting flowers and said: ‘I have tried to paint many things in many different ways, but my paintbrush always gives a tremor of pleasure when I let it paint a flower’.

However, Nicholson was not concerned with botanical accuracy, but rather wanted the plants and flowers to signify the time and place in which they were painted. This painting with its gestural and loose brush strokes illustrates her ability to communicate mood and atmosphere using few brush marks.

Nicholson believed that colour was the most important element of painting and in 1944 published the article, The Liberation of Colour, under the name Winifred Dacre.”

Text taken from http://www.gac.culture.gov.uk/nicholson.html

 

Gary Wragg Interview on Abstract Critical

Smashing Interview at Abstract Critical on Gary Wragg:

Gary Wragg talks to Matthew Collings… Very worth while combination!

http://abstractcritical.com/note/matthew-collings-talks-to-gary-wragg/#comment-499265

Abstract Critical has some very interesting articles in it.  I shimmy along for a read from time to time.  Keeps the brain matter challenged.  I am not an academic by nature, but I have always enjoyed critical analysis.   Come to think of it, it was one of my strong subjects when studying Literature at Kingston University.

 

Poetry and Painting Relationship

http://poetrychina.net/wp/calligraphy-painting/poetry_painting/2

 

Mmm…

 

 

Signs of the Times”  Prints to Buy over the Internet

I now have available selected prints from the “Signs of the Times” series on my Photobox Gallery.  The Photobox Gallery is a handy facility for enabling people to buy my prints in a quick, easy and affordable way.  The prints I describe as “Poster Prints” because they are not signed and checked by me, but I am very confident about the quality.  They are in fact  A2 and A3 sized laser prints printed on Fuji Crystal Archive Paper.  Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

http://www.photoboxgallery.com/19507 

There are other options for different types of prints on the Photobox Gallery, but at the present time I am restricting the distribution of my work over the Photobox Gallery to just A2 and A2 laser prints.   However, if you do want something specific, just contact me with your requirements and I am completely free, (thanks to not limiting these images to “limited edition”) to arrange to have prints made to varying specifications and to be signed and numbered.

Some of the “Signs of the Times” are at Baker Tilly in Guildford at the moment.  That was a useful body of work for me…Going all geometric like that!  And advertising annoys me terribly.  How much better to have signage which simply says what it is… and doesn’t impose some sense of what you might be lacking, or creating some need or desire that you don’t feel yourself.  Advertising creates a market for what someone wants to sell even when the market doesn’t exist….I do wonder about this.  This strategy to make us buy.  This way of selling.  We are surrounded by it to such an extent that the confusion it causes can become difficult to discern.  But my signs are my times.  Simple.  Straightforward.  As they are.  We can be as we are.

Quick Dip print by Jenny Meehan

Quick Dip print by Jenny Meehan. One of the Signs of the Times series

 

 

Lead, kindly Light, amid th’encircling gloom

I also include in this month’s Journal entry this hymn, which I discovered when doing the Labyrinth walk at St John’s Church, Waterloo, at the beginning of the year:

  1. 1. Lead, kindly Light, amid th’encircling gloom;
    Lead thou me on!
    The night is dark, and I am far from home;
    Lead thou me on!
    Keep thou my feet; I do not ask to see
    The distant scene–one step enough for me.
  2. 2. I was not ever thus, nor pray’d that thou
    Shouldst lead me on.
    I loved to choose and see my path; but now,
    Lead thou me on!
    I loved the garish day, and, spite of fears,
    Pride ruled my will. Remember not past years.
  3. 3. So long thy pow’r hath blest me, sure it still
    Will lead me on
    O’er moor and fen, o’er crag and torrent, till
    The night is gone.
    And with the morn those angel faces smile,
    Which I have loved long since, and lost awhile!
  4. Text: John Henry Newman, 1801-1890
    Music: John B. Dykes, 1823-1876

There is a huge conflict between knowing and unknowing.   I feel it a lot with my work especially, just wanting to know what is happening.  In reality, I haven’t a clue, though I speculate, right, think, and suggest.  This Journal is as stumbling as it will always be.  But I like writing.  It is some kind of reflection, at least.

I am trying to keep my Jenny Meehan WordPress Journal a little more brief than in the past, so that is it for now!

 

Jenny Meehan is a painter and designer based in East Surrey/South West London.
Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details.   Commissions for paintings are also undertaken at affordable prices.

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings and other artwork forms (prices ranging from between £60 and £700) and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.

Enquiries welcome.  I have more artwork than I can display on the internet, so let me know if you are looking for something specific in terms of style, function, or subject matter. 

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom and holds regular Open Studio/Studio Sale events.  To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s bi-annual  mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date.

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

I would be very pleased if you would  choose to “follow” the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed of what I am up to this way.   Just press  the “follow” button and pop in your email address.  You determine how often you get updates and you don’t need a WordPress account to follow Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.  I don’t have a Facebook page as yet, and won’t be on Twitter.  So this is the best way to follow my art practice.  Though I ramble on, I try to organise things for easy skimming, so you can pick and choose according to your own interests quite easily!    

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting

by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

*Notice regarding my use of images on my Jenny Meehan Artist’s Journal blog:   I always try and contact the relevant artist if I include images of their work on my blog and make clear the source.  Where images are taken from other websites, I make it my practice to  cite the source and often include a link to the place where the image was found. If this is not possible I will include a fair use rationale.   When I include images I do so in the belief that this will not cause commercial harm to the copyright holder. I  believe that this is fair use  and does not infringe copyright.  Images are used in order for me to comment and reference them in relation to my own creative and artistic practice.  When I include extracts of text, I also do so with the understanding that again, this is permissible under the widely accepted fair usage terms with respect to copyright.

“Sacred Spaces”  Exhibition Text Done… (Not proof read yet, so apologies for errors!)  

Rather than have the task hang over me over Easter, I have done, but not dusted, the text for the Leatherhead Art Exhibition in May.

Now I can eat my Easter Egg in peace.

Here it is:

“Sacred Spaces” – Exhibition Introduction

Welcome to this exhibition, which we hope you will enjoy.  On show are examples of work from seven members of Kingston Artists’ Open Studios: Chris Birch, Emily Limna, Jenny Meehan,  Richard Tomlin,  Derek Turner,  Hilary Walker, and Jude Wild. The exhibition has been curated by Jenny Meehan.

The exhibition’s focus is on each artist’s “sacred space” in the sense that in creating, responding to the sensations and images around us, processing our thoughts and emotions  and exploring ourselves and  our experiences through the method of making art works we are discovering a means of creating for ourselves a  “sacred space”.

The title of the exhibition “Sacred Spaces” references the inner lives of the artists , the process of creating artworks,  and evidence  expressed  physically  in the artworks themselves.  In our creation we bring body and substance from our own inner contemplation, reflection and response to life and all we experience,  both internal and external.

“The imagination is fundamental to all human activity; indeed, exercising imagination is the creative and critical, intuitive and integrative process central to human becoming.  It gives us the power to remember the past, to shape our desires, and to project possibilities for the future.” Christine Valters Paintner

 We hope that by investing your time in viewing the exhibition, you too will experience some “Sacred Space” of your own.  Please feel free to contact the artists and offer your feedback if you find the experience of looking helpful.  It is always an encouragement!  All the art work is available to buy.  Please use the purchase form in order to reserve a piece.

 

 

“Sacred Spaces”  –  Exhibition Development Discussion  Summary

Responding to an invitation to exhibit with the theme of contemplation, seven artists from Kingston Artists’ Open Studios met together to discuss their submitted art work and discuss their creative practice and process.  The idea of our working space  (both interior and exterior) being a sacred space was discussed in relation to this.

The word “sacred” descends from the Latin “sacrum” of which “sanctum” is related.  We noted that  the “creative zone”  is akin to the idea of a set apart and, in this sense,  holy, space.  It is a place of playful exploration and experimentation, and one which proves both therapeutic and enlightening.

Engagement with the natural environment, music and silence, intra personal intelligence, and relationship and communication with people are important aspects of our lives which feed into our capacity to create art.  Making space for art working  is an investment in ourselves, and is a means of self expression and self realisation, as we bring form to feeling and thought  in a tangible and material way.  

We all found the task of defining our own creative journeys challenging in the light of the huge amount of distractions and the amount of imagery we are bombarded with in today’s current culture. Some of us work with very regular studio times and others in a more piecemeal fashion. By being intentional, and creating space in our lives through the cultivation of our imaginations and our creative impulses, we can meet our need and desire to make space.  In this space, we find it easier to listen to the depths of experience which call us beyond ourselves.  It may be that this is part of a search for  a greater fullness and sense of meaning, regardless of our particular religious beliefs (or not, if none).  We all value feedback on other peoples responses to our work, recognising that what it can mean in the world will vary according to the viewer and context.  

 The above text has been tweaked and improved but I won’t swop it round… it’s pretty much the same!

Rambling Onwards…

Yes, I am still rambling on about Clyde Hopkins paintings, the reason being it is a good discipline for myself to help identify what and why I like something.  Identifying things in other people’s work which you resonate with and taking the time to mull things over is a very important part of an artist’s working processes.  If you like collecting fine art it will also reward you to take the time to do more looking, in depth, at all kinds of art forms. Your time, so invested, will pay you back in the joy of selecting  pieces of art work which will continue to give something meaningful to you very generously  over a long period of time.   If an art collector looks only to money, they are being robbed!

Clyde Hopkins continues…

I like Clyde’s paintings because they have a balance, which I nearly always go for in my own painting, of both structure and a loss of structure.  What do I mean?  I could use the words geometric and lyrical, or maybe geometric and organic would be better?  Not sure. But simply naturally balanced, as we see in nature… This is pleasing to the eye, more than one or the other.  A lily has strong structure, and also soft and gentle undulations.  Beauty has both.  I always fall for beauty.  I am a romantic, expressive, even though it isn’t  very “clever” to be so.   I just love it!  And, as I said in my last post, painting should be pleasing to the eye, as well as challenging and stimulating.

600px_clyde-hopkins-fiveacre-2011

 

Copyright Clyde Hopkins.  Reproduced with the permission of the artist, Clyde Hopkins

Above is is another stunning example,  “Five Acre” and below is “Gastropodus”, 2012  Oil on Linen, 70 x 55cm

With “Five Acre” I am thinking of cracking and breaking up, (sometimes in real life we do a bit!!!)  but balanced with growth potential in those bean-like tree-like shapes.   Old trees and little seeds.  And there is a bit of an aerial view of some fields going on in my imagination, if I need to be literal and start applying the words of the title to my own way of seeing the painting.   Those colours just bring me joy.  That’s a great thing to get from a painting for those in the world that don’t see the point of painting, or at least, don’t value it.  (That’s a little “grump” of mine,  I guess!)

 

Gastropodus Clyde Hopkins

Gastropodus Clyde Hopkins

Gastropodus Clyde Hopkins detail

Gastropodus Clyde Hopkins detail

 

Both images above are copyright Clyde Hopkins.  Permission was granted from the artist Clyde Hopkins for the use of this image.

I am very pleased to have an image of the detail.  It shows you how that mesh of friendly edged dots is made.   It does irritate the eyes I think, but I don’t use the word “irritate” in a negative sense.  It is maybe more in that the brokenness draws attention to the unbroken areas of colour.  It’s the same material; paint. Of course it is!  But takes on a completely different nature from the flowing substance which floods into the other painted areas.  I like the contrast very much.  Note to self:  Experiment with perceived textures!

Thinking: Water.  Solids.  Flux and Stasis.

“Stasis”  “A state of stability, in which all forces are equal and opposing, therefore they cancel out each other”

But we can experience stasis without the cancellation.  It’s all there, thankfully.

I have a bit of a “thing” in my own painting with rocks and water.  Maybe it’s a similar kind of interest?

It’s an interesting area there on the lower left.  Maybe a kind of assertive, “I can do what I want”  or maybe an earlier state in the process which is allowed to be?  It’s less formalised, but has enough in common to not look out of place, though it is different.

Flicking From One Painting to Another…

I am always flicking from one thing to another… Sometimes  when I am talking, I have to make myself remember I have this bad habit!  Writing, I have just warned you of it!

I am finding myself remembering some paintings by Willi Baumeister which |I looked at years ago and found most significant and helped me to think about a change in direction in my own painting from realist and very tied to the external environment to the more symbolic and internal.

Here is some information from the useful wikipedia:

“Towards the end of the 1920s, the shapes in Baumeister’s pictures grew softer. His paintings moved away from being oriented by the elementary shapes of the circle, triangle, and square towards organic forms. Although this development could also be observed concurrently in the work of other artists of his time, in Baumeister’s case, it was tied to his fascination for the prehistoric and archaic paintings. Baumeister intensely explored artifacts of early paintings and integrated this pictorial experience into his own painting. He identified the symbols, signs, and figures of cave painting as components of a valid archaic pictorial language that he used in his works. These included his increasing number of paintings in “oil on sand on canvas” that, in their materials, also approached the cave painting that Baumeister so admired (beg. ca. 1933). He himself collected examples of prehistoric findings, small sculptures, and tools, and occupied himself with cliff drawings that had been discovered in Rhodesia. This experience was undoubtedly important for Baumeister’s artistic disposition since he, evidently inspired by this rich store of prehistoric works, ultimately used extraordinarily reduced organic shapes for his “ideograms” (beg. ca. 1937). In these works he used a unique world of signs, which he saw as symbols for the laws of nature, their evolution, and human existence.”

A good link here also:  http://www.archiv-baumeister.org/index.php?getlang=en&menuid=66&reporeid=383&template=

There’s lots more of interest to be found regarding Wili Baumeister on Wikipedia,  but I l hone in on this as I mentally relate the memory of Bluxao V  to those of Clyde Hopkin’s paintings I have come across recently.  I can also, and indeed to some of my own painting experiments.   Many of my hidden  paintings which I have never shown publicly or on the internet,  are very bare boned in the symbolic…but because they took so little time to paint, I tend to keep them to myself, as they help me somehow in reminding me not to get too complicated!

I digress, most purposefully, to my most favourite Baumeister painting…  Willi Baumeister “Bluxao V”, 1955

Willi Baumeister Bluxao V 1955

Willi Baumeister Bluxao V 1955

 

I am unable to locate the source of the image, so..my rationale for using here follows:

fair use rationale
There is no alternative, public domain or free-copyrighted replacement image available.
Its inclusion in the article(s) adds significantly to the article(s) because it shows the subject (or the work of the subject) of the article(s).
Inclusion is for information, education and analysis only. The text discussing the significance of this art work is enhanced by inclusion of the image.
The image is a low resolution copy of the original work of such low quality that it will not affect potential sales of the art work.

I love this painting.  It set me free.  It resonated in all the right places!  It seems to bring me to the core of myself.  I like the way the edges of some of the paint areas look torn. I love the shadow pool of darker blue that floats below the definition.  This painting told me I could do what I wanted with paint!

Yes, this painting  helped me immensely.  I did not participate in any Fine Art Degree course,  which I think would have muddled my mind with words and concepts more than anything else (though, to be fair, as I have not been, I do not know!)  This means that I do not assume any interest in my own painting beyond immediate response, which is a personal matter.  I have not been taught that people should be able to access my work without any need for me to attempt to make it more accessible, and it is partly for this reason I write my journal.   I have had to develop my own inner determination without the validation of others around me, however, I have had some key people who I respect very much  affirm  that there is something rather worthwhile at work in me in the painting department, and this has helped me to go with the flow of painting as a focus.  It has kind of just happened anyway, I don’t think it could be any other way.  As well as some good short courses at West Dean College along the way, it is my encounters with the  paintings and artworks of others which have ended up being some of my most helpful travelling companions.  Bluxao V is one of those which stands out from the crowd, and waved me on at a key moment.  This is the painting which told me that my inner determination could take me a long way if I let it!  It taught me that  painting in anyway you want is completely legitimate  It was  a liberation to stumble across Bluxao V on the internet and see that colour arrangement and composition without any explicit or obvious external references could offer the viewer  and carry  the viewer,  into an experience through the eyes,  straight down to the soul.  An elemental matter.

My own degree being taken later in life, and in Literature, rather than painting, is a good thing.  Apart from the fellowship of other painters,  which is always a good thing,  because we need to learn from each other,  I wonder if I would have taken away more confusion, rather than clarity, from study at degree level in Fine Art.   Too much theory maybe.  Too much Science.  One needs to locate oneself  in the making.  This is not something which can be taught.

Back to the Clyde Hopkins paintings.   Which I like because they resonate with me.

Only the artist themselves hold the essence of their painting,  in their hearts.  We should never forget this, when we talk about painting, particularly if we are talking about what it might “mean” and it if “matters”.   I read the paintings with my eyes and my experiences colouring the work.  They are transformed and re created in my own eyes.  I feel I have almost trespassed over them by passing comment.  I wonder if I ought to be passing comment at all.   But some paintings are generous in their giving… and do possess an authority.  This makes me want to comment.  It makes it worth taking the risk of using words.   I always have strong reactions to the paintings I come across.  I am certain, to the core, if something is strong or weak.  I am unashamedly subjective, and cannot see how anyone else cannot see how fantastic something is when I see it clearly.  So,  while I will not apologise for this, I must just insert that of course I do realise that I may be temporarily blinded by my own enthusiastic response.  It’s a great way to get blinded though.  And if it rings “true” then it has done its work for me.

I also like very much the comparison of music and painting.    Things can be in tune, and out.  Things make nice sounds, unusual sounds, random and jazzy sounds, but you can tell if something comes together or not.  I will always be traditional in my liking for balance, order, and things which are pleasing to the eye.  Challenging, not completely comfortable, necessarily, but have a sense of some hard working behind them.  You sense there is an inner logic working away.  But there is enough mystery to keep you interested.   I think also that I appreciate these paintings because I have started to experiment with colour more, and so I appreciate the particular process of balancing one against the other.  I can appreciate the achievement.  I can recognise the delivery, and admire them for that.

Baker Tilly in Guildford.

I need to sort these prints out soon.  The prints which will be on show at Baker Tilly are signed on reverse with both my signatures.  I have two signatures, one is a combination of my initials and the other my usual signature which I use in daily life.  I tend to sign paintings just with the combination of my initials and prints with both.  But it depends on the work.  I always use my initials signature, for all my work now.  I like the way it can be used on any material, for example, clay and even stone, quite easily.

Here is another one of the “Signs of the Times” Series for you to see:

Put Your Point Across by Jenny Meehan, Signs of the times series abstract prints geometric, jenny meehan fine artist print, uk female 21st century artist,

Put Your Point Across by Jenny Meehan

I also now have available selected prints from the “Signs of the Times” series on my Photobox Gallery.  The Photobox Gallery is a handy facility for enabling people to buy my prints in a quick, easy and affordable way.  The prints I describe as “Poster Prints” because they are not signed and checked by me, but I am very confident about the quality.  They are in fact  A2 and A3 sized laser prints…So, they are photographic quality…by this, I mean they are printed on archival quality photographic paper using a chemical process, rather than ink-jet prints.  Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

http://www.photoboxgallery.com/19507

 There are other options for different types of prints on the Photobox Gallery, but at the present time I am restricting the distribution of my work over the Photobox Gallery to just A2 and A2 laser prints.   However, if you do want something specific, just contact me with your requirements and I am completely free, (thanks to not limiting these images to “limited edition”) to arrange to have prints made to varying specifications and to be signed and numbered.

Researching

I have found lots of interest in my time spent looking at the idea of Susanne Langer.  What interesting ideas…  She argued that man is basically a symbol-using animal and that symbolic thought is deeply rooted in human nature.  Kind of flows in with my love of the symbolic right now!  She thought that symbolic thought is the keynote to questions of life and consciousness:  “Art is the creation of forms symbolic of human feeling,” (Susanne Langer). In her thinking works of art don’t directly express the experienced emotions but do express and “idea” of emotion. Susanne Langer thought  that “music articulates forms which language cannot set forth”.  It shows what cannot be said. Well indeed.  It is always so good to hear it again though!

Artists create virtual objects, illusions. For example,  music creates an auditory apparition of time, “virtual time,” and  in painting “virtual space” is the primary illusion.  Poets (and fiction writers) create appearances of events, persons, emotional reactions and places: they are  “poetic semblances.” She notes that  musical forms bear a close logical resemblance to the forms of human feelings.  So music is a “presentational symbol” of psychic process.  Its tonal structures bear a close logical similarity to the forms of feeling, “forms of growth and of attenuation, flowing and stowing, conflict and resolution, speed, arrest, terrific excitement, calm, or subtle activation and dreamy lapses.”  (Now… That IS interesting, I was thinking along those lines with the Signs of the Times when I was working on them).   The symbol and the object symbolized have a common logical form.  Susanne Langer distinguishes art as symbol – the work of art as an indivisible whole – from symbols in art, which are elements of the work and often have a literal meaning.  This is an  unconventional use of the term “symbol”  maybe, but I like it a lot!

Some Recent Paintings by Jenny Meehan 2014

 

 

Bright and Breezy" Jenny Meehan Acrylic and Oil Painting, jenny meehan abstract colourist expressionistic, modernist lyrical abstraction,female british uk 21st century artist jenny meehan, contemporary painters in uk,

Bright and Breezy” Jenny Meehan Acrylic and Oil Painting
There’s a little memory from childhood of a tuft of a tree growing on the edge of a cliff

 

 

Well, just one for now.  And here is the tuft which I placed.  (The little red and blue areas on the top left).  The resilience of which is astounding and admirable!  This made me think of a childhood visit to  Combe Martin Bay.  On the rocks around the bay is some tufty kind of tree or bush growing in a place where you think nothing would grow or be able to stand the elements.  But I was amazed last year when I saw it was still there.  I remember it as a child, and it is STILL there!  It was rather moving to see the amazing tuft in it’s impossible place.

combe martin bay tuft devon jenny meehan

combe martin bay tuft devon jenny meehan

 

There it is!

 

Acrylic Paint used with Oil Paint on the same painting – Technical Considerations

I have previously rejected the whole idea of combining an acrylic under painting with oils on top.  Somehow the two materials seem to cry out against each other, oil being so forgiving and flexible, so oily and natural feeling, and acrylics being so plastic!  But having spent several years experimenting with the qualities of both, I guess it was inevitable that the day would come when I would seek to reconcile these two opposing forces.  Just out of curiosity as much as anything else!  I don’t plan to do this long term but believe it good to try out new things from time to time.

Experiments so far have been very pleasing.  I would not use an acrylic under painting for an oil on any large canvas, but all mine are 50 x 70cm and under right now.   There are several advantages in using an under painting of acrylic paint and then using oil paint on top. It’s not always possible for me to paint in long, uninterrupted sessions, due to the nature of my studio space, (kitchen studio!) so getting some initial painting done with acrylics is much easier as it can be done in a more piecemeal fashion with less mess.  But the quick drying of acrylics, while sometimes a blessing, is a pain when it comes to having time to mull over the painting and a pain also when mixing colours…I like to leave colours I have mixed around both on the mixing board and the painting itself, in order to think about them, and adjust in slow and gradual stages, but unless I want to spend the day with a water sprayer in hand, this just cannot happen with acrylics. I also like to use the same colour over several days, and this is much easier to do with oils.  You can get slow drying acrylics and retarders, and also “stay wet” palettes,  but I think it’s best to go with the nature of the paints you are using, and not try and make them something they naturally are not.

Using oils for  some  of the uppermost layer  also brings some gloss to parts of the painting surface which with abstract paintings can be utilised in an interesting way.   I don’t use the oils for a complete covering of the acrylic, just for some parts of the painting.   I might decide to even over the finished painting with a thin picture or retouching varnish suitable for both oils and acrylics, or maybe just leave some of the matt or semi-matt acrylic as it is and let the oil, with it’s rather more glossy surface, sing along in variation.  Using medium (turps and linseed) with the oil makes it heavenly to apply and ensures it is well bound.  Using the oil paint undiluted brings some nice buttery texture into the work and is so much lovelier to use and probably works out cheaper too than heavy body acrylics.  I only use small areas of thicker undiluted oil paint on top of the acrylic.

I don’t use the oil diluted with white spirit on top of the acrylic as I feel there would be too much risk of the paint not being sufficiently bound, and therefore loose.   It would be different if painting just with oils…A slightly loose under painting would soon be resolved by the layers above it and by a final application of varnish if need be.  Also, my abstract paintings when painted with an acrylic bottom layer, often have a great variety of surfaces, thickness, and finish, (even sometimes glossy areas) and the use of medium in the oil paint makes a great deal of difference to the success of combining the acrylic layer with the oil paint on top.    I’ve just done a few for the time being, as experiments, but so far they are looking good.   I don’t think I would feel happy about using lots of oil paint over the acrylic paints on a flexible canvas of a large size.   I think it far better to stick to using a rigid support if working larger than 50 x 70 cm because of the difference between the two types of paint.   I have found so far that smaller canvas’  are easy to keep firmly stretched and I am thinking that if any problems did arise (which I don’t think will be the case, but I still consider the possibility) it would be easy to remove the canvas from the stretcher bars and simply bond onto a rigid board backing.

Technical considerations when using acrylic paint and oil paint in one painting are important and should always be born in mind.  My philosophy is do what you want but know what you are doing and what the possible consequences might be.  While I am not imagining conservators working on any of my paintings in the times to come, I do certainly want to be sure that people buying my paintings will have something which is technically sound.   If my paintings change a bit over time, that’s fine.  There is a kind of beauty in that anyway.  If bits start falling off and the whole thing endures some kind of painting personality change, then this is not good, and disappointing for everyone!  I am very strict about my pigments… The colours really do need to stand the test of time.   I also spend a great deal of time (probably far too much) testing out different combinations of layers of materials, different mixtures and different proportions of binders, fillers, textural materials and pigments…I just love it!  I find some useful things out  through it too!  One of the most useful things is that you need to test out the qualities of your materials for yourself, because proportions of ingredients are not usually stated and different brands make quite different products with the same or similar names!

The most important point about using acrylics and oils in one painting is of course that you won’t be mixing the two together!  And the other major point is that the  acrylic paint must go on the bottom, and not be placed over the top of the oil paint.   Oil paint oxidises as it dries and when fully dry is very hard and rigid.  Acrylic paints  are  softer by nature, but the extent of  this would vary depending on the quality of the acrylic paint.  Acrylic paint with a lot of filler is logically  not going to be as hard as one which has a greater percentage of acrylic binder. Generally the higher quality the acrylic paint the glossier it looks, because acrylic binder is glossy by nature.   High quality acrylic will still be sufficiently hard to make a good base for the oil paint.  It is worth noting that emulsion paints with a high proportion of acrylic resin are used in exterior decorating applications, and this is because the acrylic resin is tough and makes the paint harder and more durable.  It’s also worth noting that paints labelled  “Acrylic paint” should be just that, but I have found, (through testing,) that with some products,  the dried so called “acrylic” medium or paint sometimes actually makes rather a soft and flexible layer, which suggests that the proportion of acrylic in the paint is questionable.

All the commercially made so called modern “gessos” nowadays are acrylic based…Think along the lines of acrylic resin based medium plus chalk or a similar filler and that’s a good enough idea of what you are getting.   The more chalk (calcium carbonate) in the “gesso” the more absorbent your ground is.  (The softer too, though also more matt)  It is now a standard practice for painters to use canvas coated in layers of acrylic modern type gesso and then paint on the top of it with oil paints.  So another layer of thin high quality acrylic paint on the bottom layer is not going to make a great deal of difference.  It won’t be so absorbent, but this may be what you want.  Even neat acrylic is micro-porous and I have not experienced any problems with adhesion of oil paints on top so far.

What IS important is that the acrylic is totally dry  I mean dry and cured!  I play it  safe and wait  two weeks even for a thin acrylic under painting.  For a painting with  slightly thicker areas and textures, I wait at least four months.  If I don’t want to wait, then I just stick to using either acrylics OR oils…It is easier to paint layers over existing layers of the SAME kind of paint as you know you will retain the integrity of layers more easily.  Sometimes  I will use an isolating layer of acrylic based varnish over the acrylic painting and then use the oil on top. Varnishes tend to be of a more reliable quality with respect to the amount of acrylic in them than many paints do, because they are specifically made to be hard and protective.  Logically they would make a better match with the oil paint in terms of rigidity, and I have not found any problems with the oil adhesion to the acrylic based varnishing products I have used, as yet.   This is useful if I have been using loose acrylics (which I do deliberately sometimes!) and/or I want the surface well sealed, maybe because I don’t intend to varnish the painting at all when it is completed with the final areas in oil.  I have done this with paintings using acrylics and oils on both rigid substrates and canvas, with no complications, though all of them have been under 50 x 70 cm.  They had some textured areas and because I had used a variety of different textures and quantities of filler, I felt it best to provide a surface which was a little more uniform to receive the oil paint.  So one or two layers of a quality matt or satin acrylic varnish makes a great isolating layer between the acrylic paint and the oil paint.  I have not found this to be a problem at all.

You read a lot on the internet that a rigid surface  is always  preferable for doing a painting with an acrylic bottom layer and an oil top one, because of the need to reduce any flexibility in the acrylic layer, but I have found no issues arising with my own acrylic paintings on canvas, though I do keep the top oil layer fairly thin, use plenty of medium and don’t use great slathers of thick oil paint on large areas of the painting. I tend to use the oil paint for parts of the painting, rather than one continuous layer, and I find this makes for a very exciting surface on abstract paintings.  It is certainly worth a try and I think opens up some interesting experiences as a painter, and I am glad personally that I have stepped out in this direction with my abstract paintings, as it utilises the fine qualities of both the types of paint very well indeed.

Jenny Meehan is a painter and designer based in East Surrey/South West London.
Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details.   Commissions for paintings are also undertaken at affordable prices.

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings and other artwork forms  and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.

Enquiries welcome.  I have more artwork than I can display on the internet, so let me know if you are looking for something specific in terms of style, function, or subject matter. 

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom.  To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s bi-annual  mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date.

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

I would be very pleased if you would  choose to “follow” the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed of what I am up to this way.   Just press  the “follow” button and pop in your email address.  You determine how often you get updates and you don’t need a WordPress account to follow Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.  I don’t have a Facebook page as yet, and won’t be on Twitter.  So this is the best way to follow my art practice.  Though I ramble on, I try to organise things for easy skimming, so you can pick and choose according to your own interests quite easily!    

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting

by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

Notice regarding my use of images on my Jenny Meehan Artist’s Journal blog:   I always try and contact the relevant artist if I include images of their work on my blog and make clear the source.  Where images are taken from other websites, I make it my practice to  cite the source and normally include a link to the place where the image was found.  When I include images I do so in the belief that this will not cause commercial harm to the copyright holder. I  believe that this is fair use  and does not infringe copyright.  Images are used in order for me to comment and reference them in relation to my own creative and artistic practice.  When I include extracts of text, I also do so with the understanding that again, this is permissible under the widely accepted fair usage terms with respect to copyright.

coast photograph image,jenny meehan photograph for church website st paul's hook surrey

The photograph (NOT from Portland!) above is one I prepared for the St Paul’s Church of England, Hook, Surrey website.    I don’t take so many photographs now as more focused on painting and drawing, but there is still a certain pleasure in “finding” pictures and they serve as a useful reference for myself in terms of tracking and recording my own visual interests.  It is also of course nice to share them and good if they serve some useful purpose for others, ie, being used on the church website!  With all the rocks to follow, I thought a bit of sand would be nice.

More Past Digital Photographs

portland stone portland bill portland sussex, jenny meehan digital photography image, black and white image portland bill, monochrome photograph of portland bill sussex uk,  portland bill portland bill portland sussex, jenny meehan digital photography image, black and white image portland bill, monochrome photograph of portland bill sussex uk,   portland bill portland bill portland sussex, jenny meehan digital photography image, black and white image portland bill, monochrome photograph of portland bill sussex uk,

portland bill portland sussex, jenny meehan digital photography image, black and white image portland bill, monochrome photograph of portland bill sussex uk,

Floating Stone – Portland Bill, Portland, Sussex – Jenny Meehan

portland bill portland sussex, jenny meehan digital photography image, black and white image portland bill, monochrome photograph of portland bill sussex uk,

Crevice – Portland Bill, Portland, Sussex – Jenny Meehan

Verne High Angle Battery on Portland

This year I am  looking forward to a return trip to Verne High Angle Battery…A historic monument which our children had immense fun exploring.  Standing at one opening and shouting and speaking in a haunting voice so that it runs along the passageways and comes out the other way is excellent fun and it is an interesting walk around that part of Portland.  The battery was built as part of Britain’s Coastal Defences in 1892 and is located in a disused Portland Stone quarry at the northern end of the island.  It is built of Portland stone, concrete and brick.

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

I would be very pleased if you would choose to “follow” the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed of what I am up to this way.   Just press the “follow” button and pop in your email address.  You determine how often you get updates and you don’t need a WordPress account to follow Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.  I don’t have a Facebook page as yet, and won’t be on Twitter.  So this is the best way to follow my art practice.  Though I ramble on, I try to organise things for easy skimming, so you can pick and choose according to your own interests quite easily!    

Exploring Stone Carving

Well, now I can no longer afford to grace the gardens of West Dean College,  I had been thinking for some time of how I can continue my training.   I think it very important to try different materials, whichever one you tend to prefer to use, and after using clay during an adult education class a couple of years ago, I realised that I do enjoy working very much in three dimensions, and, even as a painter, this is very important to develop.  To work with space and the tensions between parts possible with sculpture, and to work with light in a different way to that of colour, has worked its appeal into my mind quite well, and after toying with this and that, I decided to try out stone carving.   I found that Simon Keeley  http://www.simonkeeley.co.uk/ holds  stone carving classes, both in Surrey and also in the London area.  This year he will be running a  one week stone carving course in Umbria, in Italy.  It runs from 30th July for one week.   For details of this take a look at his teaching page and follow the link.  http://www.simonkeeley.co.uk/teaching.asp

Having made my fish in clay,  I now realise I have made quite a substantial commitment to stone carving, as I did not make things easy for myself by choosing a small block of stone to work on!  Thankfully, I do like working with the stone; in this instance, it is Portland Stone which is a limestone, so not very hard compared with some.    So, I have started, and will I finish?  I plan to!  Simon is a good teacher… This cannot be taken for granted with art classes, as there are many fine artists who are good at what they do, but not good at teaching it.   The group is fun and  I will post progress as it slowly happens up on this journal.    Simon does also teach at West Dean College,  and more information on his teaching can be located on his website http://www.simonkeeley.co.uk/

Portland Stone Surrounds Us

While when I think of Portland Stone I think of Portland,  I  realise that I am encountering Portland Stone all the time when I go into London.  When I took photographs of St Giles in the Fields last year,  I was curious as to why some of the stone work was black and other blocks white.  I asked The Reverend Alan Carr (Associate Rector The Parish Church of St Giles-in-the-Fields and Director of Ordinands, Two Cities Area) about this and he explained:

“Some years ago the stones on the north side of the church were cleaned, but not elsewhere. As a result the north side now has a slightly creamy colour, whereas the remainder of the church has retained the stark and original black and white colouring, much-loved by conservation architects. When left to itself Portland Stone will age and mature as we see on the south side, but when cleaned the colour composition is altered.  Individual stones which stand out brightly may have been cleaned separately, or be of a different density. The colouring of the north side of the church is also affected by the bright yellow colouring of Renzo Piano’s Central St Giles building opposite.’

After the Great Fire of London in 1666 Portland Stone was used to rebuild many buildings, some of which I often visit, for example, the British Museum and Somerset House.  The facade of Waterloo Station is also Portland Stone, and it was used by Sir Christopher Wren in St. Paul’s Cathedral too.  These are just a few of the buildings in London  built of Stone from Portland!

Baker Tilly Exhibition 

It is always nice to be invited to exhibit, and this has happened to me for the first time ever this year!  I will show four paintings  and four digital prints.  The paintings are from a flurry of painting activity over 2012 (I won’t say, a “series” of paintings, because it is more of an explosion of paintings!).  The digital prints are from a series, as I worked on them with a more predetermined aim right from the outset, and are examples of an intense period of experimenting over the Christmas period at the end of 2012/the Spring of 2013.  I called the series “Signs of the Times”.

Here is one of the prints:

Enclosed Garden (Hortus conclusus) Digital Print from Jenny Meehan's "Signs of the Times" print series.  See more at jamartlondon.com

Enclosed Garden (Hortus conclusus) Digital Print from Jenny Meehan’s “Signs of the Times” print series. See more at jamartlondon.com

The prints which will be on show at Baker Tilly are signed on reverse with both my signatures.  I have two signatures, one is a combination of my initials and the other my usual signature which I use in daily life.  I tend to sign paintings just with the combination of my initials and prints with both.  But it depends on the work.  I always use my initials signature, for all my work now.  I like the way it can be used on any material, for example, clay and even stone, quite easily.

I also now have available selected prints from the “Signs of the Times” series on my Photobox Gallery.  The Photobox Gallery is a handy facility for enabling people to buy my prints in a quick, easy and affordable way.  The prints I describe as “Poster Prints” because they are not signed and checked by me, but I am very confident about the quality.  They are in fact  A2 and A3 sized laser prints…So, they are photographic quality…by this, I mean they are printed on archival quality photographic paper using a chemical process, rather than ink-jet prints.  Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

http://www.photoboxgallery.com/19507

There are other options for different types of prints on the Photobox Gallery, but at the present time I am restricting the distribution of my work over the Photobox Gallery to just A2 and A2 laser prints.   However, if you do want something specific, just contact me with your requirements and I am completely free, (thanks to not limiting these images to “limited edition”) to arrange to have prints made to varying specifications and to be signed and numbered.

The “Signs of the Times” series is composed of completed works in their own right, but I also view several of them as foundational, and I will be drawing from them in the future, probably for the composition and colour combinations…Not to be directly transferred to another medium, but to inform and influence  other works. Maybe to become in quite a different form?  Who knows?  I am always tempted by three dimensions…

Leatherhead Theatre Exhibition 2014 

Wanting a chance to show you some of (Not all!  You will need to come along to the exhibition to see all the work on show!) the wonderful artwork which will be on display at Leatherhead Theatre this May.

If you are interested in this exhibition and are willing to help me promote it, then contact me at j.meehan@tesco.net, or through LinkedIn or through my website contact form at www.jamartlondon.com  and I will send you a high resolution image of the flyer below to print out. Just displaying it may mean that someone gets the opportunity to enjoy it.  Anyone with an interest in art and creativity, spirituality and contemplation would enjoy it very much indeed.

Sacred Spaces Flyer by Jenny Meehan which promotes the Sacred Spaces Visual Art Exhibition at Leatherhead Theatre in May 2014 organised on behalf of KAOS  (Kingston Artists' Open Studios)

Sacred Spaces Flyer by Jenny Meehan which promotes the Sacred Spaces Visual Art Exhibition at Leatherhead Theatre in May 2014 organised on behalf of KAOS (Kingston Artists’ Open Studios)

 Below is are some examples from some of the participating artists and I will post some more up on the next blog entry also.  I enclose the text which is written by the artists themselves about their work and has been combined into an Artists Information document which will be displayed with the work when the exhibition runs.

Richard Tomlin - Lula, sacred spaces exhibition leatherhead  surrey

Richard Tomlin – Lula

  Richard Tomlin

Lula – this charcoal study of Lula was produced one autumn Monday morning. Perhaps she is reflecting on the weekend just past, or her sister and family in far away Venezuela. There’s a sadness to her mood, a far away-ness that is made more poignant by her pale skin against her lustrous, long black hair.

The search for emotion – the reflection of the interior life – is the aspect of portraiture that I find so fascinating and equally illusive. To me she seems melancholy, but as so often with portraiture, the portrait says as much about the artist’s state of mind that is reflected in the image created.

Richard studied graphics at Portsmouth College of Art and practiced as a graphic designer in London. During 2013 he decided to refresh lost skills in drawing and painting. Inspired by the work of Lucian Freud, Andrew Wyeth and Alison Lambert, led him to focus on the human figure and portraiture. 

 Richard’s work is often the result of long periods of observation, the images gradually edging towards realisation. The discovery of charcoal has been a joy, black is one of the most important colours in his palette. His current work is focused on the search to express emotion through the image. 

Richard’s work can be found on his website: http://www.richardtomlin.co.uk

 

 

Still Waters 1- Jude Wild, sacred spaces exhibition leatherhead theatre

Still Waters 1- Jude Wild

Jude Wild

The two examples of my work on show are from a strand of my practice that is inspired by place. I don’t set out to record a specific scene, but to capture a memory, a feeling and a sense of place.  I aim to express my emotional response to this place.

The places that inspire me in this way most often include still, or slowly drifting water that gives scope for reflection.  Often they also include a symbolic feature such as a jetty or temple. Subconsciously I am seeking a place of contemplation or meditation – my inner sea of calm. I think that subsequently my work does very often have an ethereal and contemplative quality.

I originally trained at art school as a theatre designer and spent many years as a professional designer of both sets and costumes. An important aspect of this work was to produce a series of visuals to express the atmospheric lighting changes of the different scenes. Now that I paint fulltime, I find that it is the light and atmosphere that provides the starting point for my work. I use a limited colour scheme to intensify the image and bring a heightened sense of atmosphere.

Committee member and Art History lecture organiser for Richmond Art Society.

Training

Art & Design Foundation Course
Canterbury College of Art, Kent

Dip AD Stage Design
Birmingham College of Art

Short Course Drawing & Painting
Slade School of Fine Art, UCL

Post Graduate Certificate, History of Art & Architecture
Birkbeck, University of London

Part of the exhibition process will be a meeting between the artists through which we are able to discuss how our art working and creativity relates to spirituality and the idea of a “sacred space”.  Hence the exhibition title “Sacred Spaces”.  I will be posting more information about the artists taking part, including what they have to say about the work they are showing in the exhibition, over the next couple of months.  I also plan to use what we have discovered through our discussion and thinking in the formation of the text which will accompany the visual art.  I have found when organising exhibitions in the past, that the last couple of months need to be devoted to publicity as much as possible, but with most of the other admin tasks mostly done, I should have time to promote the exhibition as well as doing the rather more interesting and rewarding task of researching and writing, assimilating and reflecting on the whole process so far.

All this activity for this project has meant my own painting,  plus rather too many domestic tasks, have been left for a while.  Running the household, being a mother and seeking progression as an artist, plus organising an exhibition in between everything else, means I progress with my painting rather more slowly than might otherwise be the case.  But at least I have plenty of variety!  I also feel that it is important to recognise that all we do feeds into our work, and the life and vitality of what one does as a painter comes mainly from the richness of our life experiences.  We tend to put the different parts of our life into boxes, and rate some of more worth than others, but I think this is a mistake.  For example, if it has money attached then it is “worth” something.  If not, it tends to be overlooked.  Ask any parent and home-maker who works unpaid, or anyone involved in work with less tangible and measurable results than those determined by money, and I think, at this present time in our society, they  may be liable to finding their self-worth rather battered by our present government, who seem to equate working for cash and being conventionally “successful” in an economic sense as the only sign of value of anything.  (Moan over.  Shouldn’t really moan on my blog, but so hard to resist!)

Discovering Clyde Hopkins Painting

Looking on Abstract Critical, as I do from time to time when I feel like stretching a few of my brain cells, I came across some painting by painter Clyde-Hopkins.  Now his painting is very exciting to me, as it strikes internal chords, which I don’t need to define but just resonate with  some of the things in my current thinking…that kind of under the surface thinking which happens when I grapple with where I might experiment in my own painting.  This website has some examples:

http://www.soco.org.uk/index.php?q=gallery&g2_itemId=1716

Clyde kindly was happy for me to include images of his paintings in my blog, which is helpful, as much easier to comment on individual paintings that way!   I will, over the next few Jenny Meehan Journal posts, draw your attention to some which have caught the little fishes that swim through my mind the most.  I am only using digital images to base my comments on, so my response is limited significantly by the absence of the painting right before me.  I was planning to fit into this post, but I don’t want to do the paintings a disservice by trying to reflect on them in a rush.  Right now things are a bit too hectic for me to do them justice, so better not to write anything in haste.

As ALWAYS  my Jenny Meehan Journal is far too long!  However, I don’t write it just for you to read, (though it is nice to think it may be read, of course!).  I write it to attempt at some kind of narrative which traces and skims playfully along the course of my life.  I like the element of process  of writing a blog.  I chip away in little bits, (even though the end posts are long).  The little fragments come together and somehow my piecemeal life takes on at least a little order.  I worry I will look back in years and cringe.  But never mind. We are all entitled to change, and writing is only writing, after all.  It’s not written in stone!  Even if it was, it would wear down with time.

Jenny Meehan is a painter and designer based in East Surrey/South West London.
Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details.   Commissions for paintings are also undertaken at affordable prices.

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings and other artwork forms (prices ranging from between £60 and £700) and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.

Enquiries welcome.  I have more artwork than I can display on the internet, so let me know if you are looking for something specific in terms of style, function, or subject matter. 

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom and holds regular Open Studio/Studio Sale events.  To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date.  Also, follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way.  Just press the “follow” button and pop in your email address.  You determine how often you get updates and you don’t need a WordPress account to follow Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.    

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting

by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

Happy New Year!

My resolution is to try and make my “Jenny Meehan Artist’s Journal” postings shorter and sharper, but I have failed already.  I like to stuff lots of little snippets in, and never manage to orchestrate a well rounded and well formed piece of writing…  However, I also work on the premise that readers would just shimmy down quickly and read what they personally found of interest, rather than read every little part.  The joy of skim reading!  Even easier on a phone, scrolling down quickly.  So the excess is easily trimmed off, and I may ramble on free of the worry that I might be less than interesting.  This is a great liberty… Someone speaking in another context like a church or meeting knows their listener will have to endure  the whole, regardless of how much it really meets their interest.  They may nod off, or go for a daydream… Pulled back only by a sense of duty and not wanting to disrespect the effort that may have gone into the speaker’s speaking.   With this thought in mind, my long and broken titles may be a good idea…You have each little subsection labelled and no more.  Hit and miss as you will.

A little plug for this…

I have three artworks in the exhibition below which looks like it is going to be well worth a visit.

SPEAKING OUT  Exhibition  –    Embrace Arts Richard Attenborough Centre, Lancaster Road, Leicester LE1 7HA

http://www.embracearts.co.uk

http://speaking-out.co.uk/artists/

RNID Typetalk service:  18001 0116 252 2455

e: arts-centre@le.ac.uk

Box office 0116 252 2455

Free Admission, Free parking.  Open Monday – Friday

Art Exhibition from Friday 31st January until Friday 28th March 10am  – 6pm

Also, the Speaking Out Symposium  on Friday 31st January 10am – 5pm  see http://www.embracearts.co.uk

This exhibition runs from 13th January until Friday 28th March 2014 and there are three of my photographic artworks on display.

If you are in Leicester, make a visit!

“Goethe’s Delight – Liquor Silicium”

“Goethe’s Delight – Liquor Silicium” is back from being exhibited at “The Orange Tree” Theatre in Richmond Upon Thames.  I’m rather fond of it… Still.  Good sign.   I mixed up pigments with a light creamy coloured Keim Soldalit paint, which has a wonderful matt surface, and really reflects light very well indeed.  On board properly prepared the Keim Soldalit works very nicely and I have conducted various tests over the last few years with the Keim Soldalit being mixed with various other substances…though not technically correct, I cannot resist trying.  I made some interesting pastels.  They work reasonably well.   However, Soldalit is  best left by itself with only the addition of pigments, which have to be alkaline resistant.  I have tried it out on different substrates, and have got quite a feel for it now…    I haven’t exploited  it anything as much as I intend to.  The Soldalit was much easier to use than the Beeck mineral paint on the Trafalgar Junior School Mural…  While this seems ages ago, I remember the consistency being easier to manipulate.

Here is “Goethe’s Delight – Liquor Silicium”.

goethes delight liquor silicium jenny meehan keim soldalit abstract

Goethe’s Delight Liquor Silicium jenny meehan keim soldalit abstract

To my thinking, it is a celebratory kind of work, expressing the delight of discovery.

I have just painted an oil painting on hardboard, primed and then coated with Keim Grobb, with oils.   It was an interesting surface to use, really soaking up the paint and giving a very matt surface with some texture.  In theory it should be fine…though I wonder if a layer of isolating varnish, maybe something just light, like a retouching varnish, may have been a good idea, between the Keim Grobb and the oil?    On the other hand, I like the very matt finish, and maybe this would be lessened, pretty much ruining the point of using the  Keim Grobb in the first place.   Well, let’s give it some time…It is an experiment.   It has a great texture too, as well as a casein like feel.  Drinks the paint.  Much nicer than an acrylic primer or gesso, more absorbent.  Very light reflective, which helps the colours to sing, loudly.   Will post up image soon, still in incubation of thoughtfulness right now!

Recovery Exhibition at the Institute of Mental Health, Nottingham

This is still running.  Here are a couple of images which include my two paintings “Pink Girl” and “Bandage Box”

jenny meehan paintings at the institute of Mental Health Nottingham part of Recovery City Arts Exhibition

jenny meehan paintings at the institute of Mental Health Nottingham part of Recovery City Arts Exhibition
Shows “Pink Girl” top and “Bandage Box” below.

jenny meehan paintings at the institute of Mental Health Nottingham part of Recovery City Arts Exhibition

jenny meehan paintings at the institute of Mental Health Nottingham part of Recovery City Arts Exhibition

I really  like the painting on the left of the image…Looks amazing. Will need to take a look and see whose it is.     My two are on the right of the image.

Winter Tasks

Sorting out work which has been piling up in cupboards and drawers.

 river, water, trees , branches imagery meehan,water branches black white photos sale buy, selection of black and white photographs - Jenny Meehan monochrome prints

selection of black and white photographs – Jenny Meehan monochrome prints

I don’t take as many photographs as I used to, but still like working on the occasional digital image.   Affordable digital C- prints are good to offer to people who don’t have, or want, to buy an original painting and are so easy to produce.  I really need to get my Photobox Gallery facility sorted out so that people can buy these online, but it is one of those jobs I always successfully manage to avoid.  I am much more interested in pushing new work ahead rather than selling prints of past work!  If you do want an affordable print of something, do contact me and let me know what kind of thing you are looking for though, because though I haven’t gotten around to putting work online, I have a lot of photographic and digital imagery available.

I have been organising past work and taken a few more images so I can build up an illustrated catalogue/record for easy reference, and, for easy location, as there is a need to store things in several different places, and this can make finding particular paintings or prints a little tricky!

Brendan Carroll 

I am also having plenty of time to review and reflect on paintings past/those still in progress.   Which made reading this article by Brendan Carroll very suitable for the season.   Brendan Carroll writes most insightfully on the importance of time and reflection, on asking questions of your painting and seeking to relate it to other paintings in a way which may add light to being able to examine what one is doing.  Having experienced myself recently a certain sense of tiredness and boredom with a lot of the paintings I see (thankfully marked out here and there with paintings which do assert themselves in interesting ways), it was a pertinent read.  Also, maybe I am  experiencing a feeling of having seen the same thing (in different flavours) far too many times before,  and it has been easy to feel discouraged and disappointed with the way that painting appears to be  pushing forwards.  However, this may just be my own personal low mood…  I know there is lots of exciting stuff out there, I meet it sometimes, and it encourages me.  Also, I think that these “troughs” in my own creative mood are natural and good, but probably colour my vision in a little of a negative way!

I like Brendan’s challenge  and I think it is timely.  We should maybe make sure we keep the bar raised and keep our own expectations high.  If a wet painting “just does”, then it is not doing enough.  I personally feel each and every painting should push new ground and dig into the old at the same time.  But I guess it is not surprising that production rather than contemplation should maybe have taken centre stage, due to our culture which is so materialistic and production orientated.  And sometimes it may be a simple matter of producing a set or series, or body of work which looks good together.

http://burnaway.org/patience-painting/

Menier Gallery “Free Painters and Sculptors”

“Without Boundaries”  Exhibition

Free Painters and Sculptors
Monday 2 – Saturday 7 December 2013
The blurb…

“Without Boundaries is the first Open exhibition that the Free Painters and Sculptors have held in many years and are delighted to welcome new artists to exhibit with this long-established society at the Menier Gallery.

The exhibition title Without Boundaries is staying true to the founding principles of the organisation, allowing artists true freedom of style and expression. This exhibition will feature a variety of contemporary paintings, prints and sculpture from a competitive selection of 40 established and emerging artists.”

My visit to the Free Painters and Sculptors in December took me to this interesting sculpture:

zoe landau konson sculpture at menier gallery mother me

zoe landau konson sculpture at menier gallery mother me

zoe landau konson sculpture at menier gallery mother me

zoe landau konson sculpture at menier gallery mother me

http://www.zoeelle.com/home/

Thank you to Zoe, for kindly letting me include images of her work here on my blog.  Take a look at her website, it is very interesting and exciting art working.

Viewing the work was made perfect for me by the small paper sign “Please Do Not Stroke The Sculpture”.    The calling out, each tentacle, with it’s nipple like end, reaching towards you, calling out to be touched, desiring you to touch it, needing you to touch it… And yes, more than touch… to stroke it, because there was not one, but many, crammed together, like some needy, but equally assertive, emotional…object?  Being?  Maybe between the two!  ?  How often have we felt so prickly, so defensive, and yet been so soft, knitted together and vulnerable at the same time?

What a delight.  The small paper sign just brought this little bit of conflict into the experience, which kind of made a little tension there, for me, which felt just right!

I always find sculpture so much more engaging than painting when I visit exhibitions lately.

Gosh, as usual,  my blog is a mass, even a mess of, little bits. Piecemeal.  Piecemeal fashion!

 Christian Spirituality – For Reflection

Christ has no body now on earth but yours,

no hands but yours,

no feet but yours,

Yours are the eyes through which to look out on Christ’s

compassion to the world,

Yours are the feet with which he is to go about doing good,

Yours are the hands with which he is to bless people now.

       

        St Teresa of Avila 1515 –82

Poem for “Awakening”

Wow, in all the sorting out of December, I found this poem.  I wrote it for the rethinkyourmind competition.  Oddly, I got an email back about my poetry entries saying that they were off the topic…??  The topic being “With good mental health I…”   Not sure why this was counted as being off topic myself, but never mind.  Such is poetry I guess.  I would have thought that awakening, opening your eyes and your self to reality, was a very good indication of good mental health.    I had my painting “Awakening” up on the wall at the time, and hence, the title of the poem was taken from the painting, which inspired it, or nudged it into existence, at least!

Awakening – Jenny Meehan

Awakening

I can carry

a thought through thick and thin. Stop

by choice, not only when falling. Hear

my heart beat

to see new beauty. Speak

that I may be more

than dusty darkness, or a gap between others.

Now I hold

my inner light:  Lift it high. I  bring myself outwards.

I carry treasure, revealed in unexpected places.

Glitter and gold?  Yes, I have plenty – Both the stars –

which always hung  in the night, and the sun

which persisted in rising, even though I would rather sleep.

Yes, I have reason to move forwards.  I have life within and life around

I have colour, texture, and the ground is not so steep.

Jenny Meehan 2013        Keep fiddling with it, so in progress.  Interesting to see the changes I make.


Art and Spirituality

I don’t like to part the two words…there is no parting in my mind.   The wonder of creation is the spiritual made flesh and the making of an artwork is a most wonderful way of  being.  It is prayer, it is silence and speech (well, language…) together, working.  It asks only for our attention, our participation, our giving of a small amount of time, and a willingness to enter into the experience of looking (or listening).  The experience of looking is so much more than an external, assessable matter.  It is allowing oneself to be permeated with the materials, colours, presence of the work.  Sometimes the connection and encounter is easy, even instant, sometimes we meet easily a precious experience which can add richness to our life.    Praise our Creator God, that S/He  felt such love to bless us with such creativity, wrapped into our spirits and bodies, with love.

(Note, as a woman, it matters a great deal to me to identify God as not “He” as is convention, but as both male and female in description… a necessary, yet clumsy expression, of our Maker.      God is described as many things..ie “a rock”, yet of course God is not actually a rock, just as God is not a man or woman, apart from Christ, of course. (If Christ wasn’t a man in his time, he would have never have been allowed to do anything, I shouldn’t think!!!!)

Jenny Meehan is a painter and designer based in East Surrey/South West London.
Her website is http://www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at http://www.jamartlondon.com for further details.   Commissions for paintings are also undertaken at affordable prices.

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also creates representational and figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom and holds regular Open Studio/Studio Sale events.  To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date.  Also, follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting

by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

“Angel Project” at Kingston Parish Church

Below the design I submitted to the “Angel Project” at Kingston Parish Church.  Not quite sure what’s happening with the “Angel Project”… The idea was for some designs to be selected and printed, then given to those who made donations for the renovations needed in the church…Still brewing, I think.   I enjoy a bit of work on the computer from time to time, and was pleased with the outcome of this.  Yet to find out if anything is going to happen with it, as it hasn’t been selected, and possible may not.

angel print for all saints church of england kingston upon thames angel campaign submission by jenny meehan
Angel print for All Saints church of england CofE Kingston parish church kingston upon thames angel campaign submission by jenny meehan

“All Glass”Painting Images

Well, the light at this time of year is just great for photographing texture… And so I did, results below.  As the painting is no longer in my possession, it is helpful to have the images in order to remember what I did.  I am not sure if I will do such a geometric abstract painting again, preferring the  mark making, gesture,  and lyricism explored in the recent past, but it was a good experiment and I took quite a lot away from the experience which I can utilize in other abstraction with acrylics for certain.

If you are interested in commissioning a painting, just contact me and we can discuss possibilities.   Pricing depends on the size of the painting, materials used, size of the work and the time involved in making it, but a rough guide is from around £200 to £400 for a 70 x 50 cm painting on canvas.   I also construct frames for my paintings if required, which add on around another £40 – £60, depending on the type of frame used.    Some collectors like to frame-work themselves, which I don’t mind at all…One collector purchased three pieces of work from me and got their local framer to sort out the framing, which was fine from my point of view as the work was on card and board and I don’t like messing around with glass in frames…It doesn’t agree with me at all!   But for the canvas, it works out more economical to buy the frame I provide with the work, plus I do put a fair amount of thought into the framing and how it relates to the painting, so it rather becomes part of the work in a way.

Collecting Art on a Modest Budget

This is an interesting read:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/artsales/5872637/Art-Sales-how-to-collect-modern-art-on-a-modest-budget.html

I am always encouraged when I find earnest and interested collectors with a passion and love for painting have found my work and of course it is especially lovely when they decide to purchase a piece!  What gives me a lot of happiness is when I know that someone has brought something because they respond to it in a way that brings them a lot of pleasure and reward… When it is part of a collection which expresses their own love and interest for visual art, and isn’t just a matter of accumulation, though it must be very enjoyable to develop a strand of interesting artworks, paintings or prints in that way.  To have an art collection in which different artists and paintings relate to each other in interesting ways would be a fascination in itself. I would collect myself, if I had more room and more disposable income!

There are some very sound and useful pointers for the person wishing to start a collection of art here on the artbusiness.com  website:

http://www.artbusiness.com/collspch.html

Grayson Perry

I enjoyed all of the lectures

“A pilgrim on the road to meaning”   Grayson Perry’s definition of an artist…

Rather love that,   I have often felt that my own art working is indeed a way to make sense of the world/my life experiences.

A wonderful gift was given to me today!  (06/11/2013)

I now own a beautiful book “Fine Collection of Chinese Painting Masters”

I spent some time looking around the exhibition at the Royal College of Art…My original intention was to view the National Open Art Competition show also showing at the Royal College of Art, but thankfully there was more, and I found it.  Nothing really grabbed me at the National Open Art Competition show…This doesn’t mean there were not many things of interest, but nothing grabbed me emotionally at all, and I began to wonder if my emotions, like so many leaves right now, had fallen off their branches and were intent on rotting and rotting alone.     As I walked around the  “Ink China – Excellent Chinese Painting in UK Exhibition”  my only real sadness and disappointment was that all these painters were men…There were plenty of  masters, but not one mistress in sight!  Well, maybe “Paintress” would avoid confusion…And firmly place the exact role in focus without any confusion!

However,  I am sure things will change.  My own self is suffering right now from the way our own country seems intent on undermining any role in society that doesn’t involve financial gain and measurable results…

Some selected quotes from the text of my delightful gift:

“…ink culture is regardless of “subject and object” and requires us to make them blend.  By making a confession of heart and soul with ink, we set mind and emotion smooth and free, thus expressing the mood of the painting just as its creating purpose.  Although it is not good at getting itself directly involved in social change with grand narrative mode, it can still express true feeling for life and profound life values.  It “repairs ones inner heart and benefits the outside world” and “expresses individual ambition to vibrate his gentleness” (or “hers”…I must add here).”

“The biggest function of Chinese painting is to calm people down.  It is not a presenter of struggling but the singer of nature, it seeks to the quietest and the farthest to create the harmony between human and heaven…If this cultural realm of ink is well understood worldwide, there will be much less bloodshed and battle”

“This “Fine Collection of Chinese Painting Masters” is an artworks collection of the “Ink China” exhibition sponsored by Painting and Calligraphy Academy of Central Research Institute of Culture and History…These works are inherited yet not limited by the pattern; innovative yet abide by rules…this collection is regarded as a gift dedicated to the overseas Chinese and international friends.  These artworks convey the best wishes of the Chinese ink artists to the world…”  Wrote at Purple Cottage Scholar House, Beijiing, in the summer of 2013  by Cheng Dali

Well, thank you, thank  you and thank you again.  I will meditate in my room, as the curator advised.  And let me pray that those paintresses will be free to join the painting masters in the task so well suited to the gentle spirit which we desire to cultivate in the production of art.  And may the gentle nature which we see in living creation, though often faced with destruction, death and dying…Let it flourish.

I found this on the internet, and it was very interesting indeed.  It is quite hard to listen to, and needs some patience, but I found it well worth the effort.  I am quite interested in the combination of very great structure and also very great freedom of expression, (maybe order and chaos?!) and it must be surely a very significant and interesting time for artists trained with such structure and yet opened up to all that lies beyond the many years of tradition.  Indeed the interest lies not only in the subject matter (I have already expressed my orientation towards mountains/rocks and water!) but also in the potential of the extreme control of composition and mark-making combined with the free flowing and spontaneous….Maybe the rock of structure with the flow of the completely un knowable and uncontrollable…  Oh, I ramble on, but it is a pleasant journey.   Poetic form with emotion is a heart which beats very strongly, and for me, made my responses to the Chinese paintings I saw recently much more engaging and something which helps me to clarify certain strands in my own visual practice…Certain values and interests which have been sneaking up rather quietly but which hold some plentiful promises for future directions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrhbmSt1c9w

There is a lot about China and the way things are so controlled which deeply concern me and seem quite far away from the freedom which I value so much.  I have to add this.  Because though romantic, I am also quite a realistic type of person!

“Meeting Places ” at Southwark Cathedral

I felt so grateful for the opportunity to take part in this event, and have taken lots of ideas and thoughts away with me to grow and develop I hope.    I was particularly struck by this part of the closing worship:

Bishop Christopher:  Christ speaks:  “Arise, let us go from here, for you in me and I in you
together, we are one undivided person”
(from an ancient sermon for Holy Saturday

Each of us walks an unknown path to a land we do not know
Yet Christ walks with us.
Together we are undivided person.
Christ leads us along the way, and he is our way. 

So, I had to search it out and find this ancient sermon…anything ancient sound interesting to me!

http://www.vatican.va/spirit/documents/spirit_20010414_omelia-sabato-santo_en.html

And so reading in context;  essential and dimensional for thinking!

Yet another item for the notebook!

I am taking a little Christmas break from the blogging, as very much in need of more painting time, which of course gets harder as Christmas approaches and the extra tasks mount up!  I have made a Christmas Cake this year for the first time in ages, which I hope will taste wonderful.

Dare I say it… In the light of my absence…..Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year!!!!!

Jenny Meehan is a painter and designer based in East Surrey/South West London.
Her website is http://www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at http://www.jamartlondon.com for further details.   Commissions for paintings are also undertaken at affordable prices.

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also creates representational and figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom and holds regular Open Studio/Studio Sale events.  To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date.  Also, follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

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