Germination Image

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, jenny meehan, jennifer meehan, jamartlondon.com,germination seed image,new life,creativity image, black and white graphic image germination,jenny meehan woman female contemporary british artist 21st century,

germination print jenny meehan jamartlondon© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved;

I have just done some framing.  Knee is painful. Knee cap is grating.  But framing brings quick and impressive feelings to the forefront of the mind.  So nice to see the printed image sitting so comfortably in it’s position.

Escape from Death Image

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, jenny meehan,jennifer meehan graphic art print,jamartlondon,escape from death deliverance from evil image, christian art and spirituality,christian artist uk based,british contemporary christian art, jamartlondon.com,life and death art image, birth and death art image,

escape from death by jenny meehan graphic print to buy jamartlondon.com© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved

The actual print has less of a colour contrast than how the image shows here on screen.  I altered it a bit for the print so it is more subtle.

Knee Replacement Season

Well, I start a new journey soon into the land of knee replacement.  So I may be working on some digital images for a while rather than working on larger paintings.   I do have some small scale projects I can work on.  The months of December, January, February and March tend to be a little more sedentary anyway.  So it should work out quite well.

Going into hospital has suddenly reminded me of my “real name”… for I am a Jennifer Meehan not actually a Jenny Meehan.  I have used Jenny Meehan since around the age of 18 when I left home.  When people call me Jennifer I seem to loose a few years and am reminded of how I was when living at home in my parents house.  Well, that is one way to loose a few years I guess!  It is odd when you are suddenly referred to with a name you do not use anymore.  Though it has made me decide to use the “proper” form of my name a little more, in addition to the Jenny Meehan which I work with and use all of the time.  The world is full of Jennifers who are Jennys!

I sign my work with my initials which are J, A, and M.  Jenny/Jennifer Meehan is née Jennifer Ann Gray.  So Jennifer Ann Meehan becomes JAM.  Hence the name jamartlondon for my website.  If I used my maiden name, it would be JAGARTLONDON.  That’s not bad, but JAMARTLONDON is better!

Well, that was a pleasant little meandering discourse!

 

Past painting…

Sack of a Great House/Arise, Sleeper

Painting experiment with acrylic,pigments,textures - Jenny Meehan

“Arise, Sleeper, Wake/Sack Of A Great House” Jenny Meehan 2010

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

This painting is an early example of my experimentation with texture in my work.  It may well be the first time I used fillers of different sorts.  That was back in 2010.

Ephesians 5 v14  “This is why it is said: “Wake up, sleeper, rise from the dead, and Christ will shine on you.”

 

Jenny Meehan, Oil painting experiment, 2010

UnderPainting for an Oncoming Vision/The River Within  by Jenny Meehan  2010

© Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved, DACS

Under Painting for an Oncoming Vision/The River Within is an example of some of my earlier work.  In this painting I was experimenting with glazes.  Oil on board.  In the flesh the painting does radiate light in a very pleasing way.  You cannot quite get that from looking at it on a screen.

 

 

Interesting information on Gloss and Emulsion Paint

Well, you know I appreciate that this won’t get everyone excited, but for me as a painter when I find nice clear information on paint, I am very happy indeed!  Someone mentioned gloss paint to me in conversation and it is not something I have tried, so this maybe something for the new year.

Gloss or emulsion

When we buy a can of paint we expect to be able to apply it with a brush or roller and for it to dry leaving behind a solid film. To achieve this paints are made up of a mixture of different components. Although paints designed for different purposes will have different formulations, they all have some key features in common.
Paints contain a pigment to give colour, including white; a film former that binds the pigment particles together and binds them to the surface to be painted; a liquid that makes it easier to apply the paint and additives to make the basic paint better to store and to use.

The two main types of paint are gloss and emulsion. (My addition, well, not quite, but for domestic household use, yes!)

Gloss Paint
Gloss paint is widely used because it produces an attractive shiny surface that is so durable that it can be used outside. The binder or film former in gloss paint is called an alkyd resin. This is a long chain polymer made by reacting a vegetable oil such as soya bean or linseed oil with an alcohol and an organic acid. The resin is dissolved in an aliphatic petroleum solvent, so that it can be spread easily. When the solvent evaporates, the oxygen of the air interacts with the resin which results in the formation of cross links between the polymer molecules and produces a strong, dry film.
A typical gloss paint formulation
Component Percentage by mass
Alkyd resin binder 54
Pigment 25
Solvent 17
Additives 4
(Additives might be driers and anti-skin agents)
Emulsion Paint
Some paints are emulsions . They are made up of tiny droplets of liquid polymer binder spread out in, rather than dissolved in water. This emulsion can be spread easily.
The polymer is made by the addition polymerisation of alkene monomers such as ethenyl ethanoate, methyl 2-methylpropenoate and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate. These monomers can be mixed in different proportions before polymerisation to form a co-polymer which has exactly the right properties for the purpose it is to be used for.

After an emulsion paint is applied, the water evaporates and the polymer particles pack closely and fuse together to form a continuous film. The use of water rather than an organic liquid means that emulsion paints produce fewer VOC (volatile organic compounds) when they are used.
A typical emulsion paint formulation
Component Percentage by mass
Co-polymer binder 15 to 23
Pigment (white) 20
Pigment (colour) 0 to 5
Extenders 15 to 25
Water 25 to 50
Additives 2 to 5
(Additives might be antifreeze, dispersing aids, wetting agents, thickeners, biocides, low temperature drying aids, antifoam agent, coalescing solvent, ammonia)”

The above is quoted from: http://resources.schoolscience.co.uk/ICI/14-16/paints/paintch1pg1.html

 

I am so happy reading this! Crazy, Yes.  For sure!  Love Paint!

Quotes I like…

This below from http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-language-of-painting/

http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-language-of-painting/

by John Holland

Though it will deeply pain Mr. Gouk, I agree that art is not a language, except in the most metaphorical way. It’s not true to say that, “If art has a meaning, then it must be a language”; language is a particular conception, and all real languages share certain necessary features,such as modular units that must be arranged according to quite strict syntactical rules if they are to make sense. What are the equivalents in painting of tenses, verbs, word definitions? Any metaphorical application of the word ‘language’ to art (or music) is too vague to be useful. Maths, maybe, is the only thing that might meaningfully be called a non-verbal language.

As Gouk suggests, a work like Finnigan’s Wake pushes the rules about as far as they will go before sense breaks down- which is why, by and large, literature has had to ‘retreat’ since then to more conservative forms. There’s no equivalent in Modernist painting.
Art has meaning, but it lies largely outside language- this is why it fails when it tries to operate in essentially verbally structured contexts like political discourse.”

 

Art has meaning, but it lies largely outside language- this is why it fails when it tries to operate in essentially verbally structured contexts like political discourse.

 

Victor Brauner

I have been looking at some work by Victor Brauner recently, who I had not heard of before.  Here is some information on him.

Victor Brauner’s multi-media practice is now most closely associated with Surrealism. During his training at the School of Fine Arts in Bucharest, Brauner had in fact developed an expressionist style, which he later abandoned during his involvement with various Dadaist and Surrealist art publications. It was Yves Tanguy who formally introduced Brauner to the Surrealists and instigated his involvement with the movement. His practice, which included painting, drawing, and printmaking, drew from disparate symbolic systems like Tarot Cards, Egyptian hieroglyphics, and ancient Mexican texts. Brauner asserted that all of his paintings were autobiographical in some way. He led a turbulent life of constant displacement; anticipating the danger of World War II, Brauner reduced the dimensions of his canvases such that each could fit in his luggage for emergency travel—he called these his “suitcase paintings.”  (quoted from Artsy.net) 

And from my reading:

Dialogues; Conversations with European Artists at Mid-Century by Edouard Roditi
An interesting extract:
Victor Brauner interviewed by Edouard Roditi. A small extract from a longer interview.
ER: Do you believe that non formal abstract art can offer an artist a new kind of freedom?
BRAUNER: In theory perhaps, at least as long as it relies on chance to suggest meanings for its formlessness. In practice, however, it generally concerns itself with such problems only superficially and soon degenerates into a style of decoration that lacks any more articulated systems of beliefs, thought and emotion. In any case, such terms as figurative and non-figurative or formal and non formal suggest very superficial categories. An artist such as Paul Klee understood quite properly that he had to try his hand at any style that occurred to his mind, and this is how he managed to leave some works that are figurative and others that are nonfigurative – but all of them equally typical of his very personal genius.
ER So you would not advise an artist to seek too personal a style to which he would remain rigidly faithful in all his work?
BRAUNER : Certainly not. The modern art market requires that an artist specialise and, in the long run, repeat himself too. But what he then produces may no longer illustrate what remains indispensable to him as artistic expression – I mean a sense of adventure, of discovery and perhaps even of danger, of the risk of really making the wrong choice and of losing or destroying himself as an artist. Whenever I face a fresh canvas,I feel like a new man and become an utter stranger in my own eyes. When one faces this mystery of becoming and of self discovery and self-expression as an artist, one can no longer rely very much on what one has already achieved. But this is also why I can never have a very clear long-range plans. I do not want to become a specialist in any strictly limited style or range of subject matter, though I may actually find myself more often preoccupied by some problems or symbols than by others. Nor would I really be able to be such a specialist, even if I wanted. But this problem, fortunately, has never arisen in my life, and this may well be why I continue to feel the need to work and to create, as if I had never yet created anything in the past which I can still recognize as wholly my own”
At the time of this brief interview, Brauner was seriously ill and easily tired. A few weeks later Victor Brauner died and this was his last interview.

 

Interesting with respect to the matter of repetition, and what a wonderful quote:

Whenever I face a fresh canvas,I feel like a new man and become an utter stranger in my own eyes. When one faces this mystery of becoming and of self discovery and self-expression as an artist, one can no longer rely very much on what one has already achieved.

My own experience for the need for constant jumping into the dark, into the unknown, into the not previously explored avenues of the unfolding process of my painting, and how important it feels NOT to simply do something because it has worked well, or is popular, or has some other reason to be done, finds some agreement here.  This may not make commercial sense, however,  I ask myself what matters the most and what I personally think more important.  Freedom is a key not worth throwing away unless it is absolutely necessary to do so.   At the moment I am free to be led by whatever happens next, without needing to know what that whatever will be.  I do find that there are distinctive strands in my work, they resurface again and again; it just happens.  The art is to look back and consider them from a distance of time having passed, to ask if they have any direction to point one to, and to not force any coherence in one’s work, but simply let it happen.

 

Suburban Meditations/Painter’s Development Images…

Once more, a look into what caught me when my camera served as my main tool.  I am thinking of buying a new camera, but so confused by the choice!!!  My extensive archives of imagery lie waiting for resurrection.  But it is nice to look back at what I was looking at (and finding interesting) when I took more photographs more than I painted.  And then I ask myself what the images are saying to me now.   Quite a lot.  Of lovely silent words.

 

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

jamartlondon. christian artist uk, women artist uk, suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

christian artist uk, women artist british, suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

women artist british, christian artist uk, suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

suburban meditations painters development series jenny meehan

 

Types of metal fixings and neglected structures drew me towards them.  Wood and metal were the main materials I took photographs of.  I experimented with colour images but in the end presented a lot of my photographs in black and white as the kind of control over colour was too limited with photography, or at least, in my case, with using pretty limited types of photographic equipment and not printing the images myself.   I take very few photographs at the present time.  I feel I have so many that I have not utilised and engaged with sufficiently.  So much material that could bring forth so much.  So I have put an end to taking more images at the moment. ( Very occasionally I succumb!)  Sometimes I see something I cannot resist, but it is not helpful to try and do too much. We have too many images.  This feeling probably accounts for my getting lost (willingly) into abstraction!

 

There Will Always be a Point at Which We Will Meet

 

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

 

 

Past Painting and Poem :  Bandage Box

 

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

jenny meehan jamartlondon art work uk licensable images

Bandage Box

Gently pressed
fabric
laid over a stretched surface,
soaked in milky balm.
I am tenderly
making, building
a new impression with my mind
whose inner wound cannot be bound
but which seeks
to make
new structure.

Jenny Meehan 2013 (written to accompany the above painting of 2013) 

 

There will be some wounding experience with my knee replacement, but wounding with the aim of healing and repair is quite a different matter to wounding with destruction as it’s intent.

 

 

And Now…

I have been dwelling on similar material recently… Reflecting on the healing process of painting, because it clearly is a healing process for me.  The bringing together, in articulating something, something which I don’t know when I start, but which evolves.  The something which is becoming.  Bringing into being a painting is like realising an emotion…, or maybe not just emotion, something of the heart; a heart connection and an experience felt.  Maybe coming from a memory or experience.  That memory need not be explicit and clear but I can still paint from it.  Paint from its centre, from the time when it started.  It may be from the past but the time doesn’t matter,  The main thing is that it is and that I don’t need to ignore it or push it away. So the whole thing about painting for me is that it is about being allowed to be.  Being and coming into being.  Feeling and experiencing the paint and the material and the process of painting.  And for nothing else to matter.  There is a space in that which is healing. There is a bringing together and a resolution of something within.  There is the fact that it appears and that it now matters.  It always mattered but it could not be seen.  And there is nothing about that painting which is not me.  And there is everything just laid there to see.  Which is rewarding.  And the work has been hard, not easy. Sometimes easy, in a kind of surprise, but often very hard.  But the bringing together of the painting is very rewarding.  I feel engaged in life in a way that is essential to my happiness.  I think I have written about the psychology of flourishing before on this journal.  And that whole thing of “being in the flow” or in your element.   I think some of the recent paintings I have been working on this year may touch on both the experience of flow, of happiness and of healing.  The relief of coming together.

And here is one of  my VERY recent paintings.

This one, “Mending”…It may well acquire an additional title as I continue the phase of contemplation through simple looking for a while.   Sometimes over time a painting speaks of something not so obvious at the time of painting, or even just after it.

But this is “Mending” for now.

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“Mending” uses a mixture of Keim Optil paint, acrylic paint, and household emulsion.  I have also used painted card which is something I have been keen to use for a while.  The substrate is hardboard which has a lovely colour which I have left showing in places.  There are also some areas of paper tape.  The size is just 20x16inches.  This is a good size for such experiments as not too big, and I rather like the aspect ratio.

 

A nice little quote, rather random, but still lovely;

“Conversion, at its root, is not the action performed but the source of that action, the experience of being loved.”
Carroll & Dyckman,  quoted from Inviting the Mystic Supporting the Prophet. 

That is it for now.  Happy Christmas!

 

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Open Art” Open Studio – Jenny Meehan 

Date:  13th December

Time 2pm til 6pm

This is not a selling event, just an opportunity to come along and see some of the paintings I am working on at the moment.

Please RSVP if you plan to come along, as space is limited.

Tea, Coffee and biscuits provided.

Cntact me via my website contact form  www.jamartlondon.com 

 

We have just taken this down, but it went down very well, and got positive feedback.

 

“All Saints Church North Aisle Exhibition

Nataliya Zozulya has kindly curated a small
exhibition of varied work  by  invited artists
who participated in the “Angel Project”, in the
North Aisle of All Saints Church in Kingston.

The exhibition runs from 11th November until
25th November 2014 and can be viewed at all
times when the Church is open.

Invited artists include Nataliya Zozulya, Jenny Meehan,
Stewart Ganley and Chris Birch who are also members
of KAOS.

Everyone is welcome to come along and have look at the
show, it is situated in the tranquil environment of the
North Aisle and perhaps, while you are there, you may
enjoy a coffee at the cafe in the newly refurbished church .”

north aisle kaos exhibition 2014 all saints kingston

north aisle kaos exhibition 2014 all saints church of england kingston

 

north aisle kaos exhibition2014 all saints church of england kingtons upon thames , kingtston artists open studios group ehibition, jenny meehan, chris birch, nataliya zozulya

north aisle kaos exhibition2014 all saints church of england kingston upon thames

All Saint’s Church in Kingston Upon Thames has  been refurbished and it looks fantastic.  I like particularly the lovely angels on the ceiling which stand out beautifully.   As it is the run up to Christmas, I’d like to share my “Angels Project” design with you.

all saints church angels project design angel abstraction holy holy holy image jenny meehan

all saints church angels project design angel abstraction holy holy holy image jenny meehan

 

Ivon Hitchens

I come back again and again to admire Ivon Hitchens paintings.  They are an education in themselves.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ivon+hitchens&safe=active&es_sm=93&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=-pxjVPvNKfK_sQTU6ILgBA&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAQ&biw=1366&bih=643

Surrey  Artist’s Open Studios 2015

I am pleased to say that I will be taking part in the 2015 Surrey Artist’s Open Studios as part of the Kingston Artist’s Open Studios group.   I plan to show some paintings and a few digital prints and though it seems ages away, I know from experience how quickly the time flies, and so invite you to make a note of the Surrey Artist’s Open Studios well ahead of the actual dates, which are from the 6th until the 21st of June 2015.  The weekends I will be participating in are the weekend of the  13th and 14th and the 20th and 21st and I will be part of a group showing in Kingston Upon Thames in Surrey.  If you are interested in joining my mailing list and/or coming along to see not only my work, but that of the six other wonderfully talented artists, then contact me via the contact form on my website www.jamartlondon.com, and I will send you further details about the Surrey Artist’s Open Studio group I am part of nearer the time.  It’s going to be good!

For general information on the Surrey Artist’s Open Studios:

http://www.surreyopenstudios.org.uk/home/visitors/open-studios/

To see my Surrey Artist’s Open Studios Page on the Surrey Artist’s Open Studios Website:

http://www.surreyopenstudios.org.uk/home/visitors/find-a-surrey-artist/artists/?mem_id=993

 

What is Spiritual Direction? – Some Descriptions for Consideration

As I become increasingly interested in various retreating practices, the contemplative way of life, spiritual direction (spiritual mentoring/guiding) as a ministry to others and invest time into researching and experimenting with this increased emphasis in my life, I have endeavoured to try and locate some descriptives/definitions of “spiritual direction”.  When I mention “spiritual direction” most people haven’t heard of the word, and it is an alien term to many people, or at least, it appears so, from my limited experience.  As is the case with so many things in life, sometimes the terminology and and language we use can present blocks to  helping people to gain an understanding of something related to faith. “Spiritual”   and “Director” are two very loaded words, and together, I think, sound rather unattractive!   It’s a shame,  but in response to my aversion to the terminology, I can at least attempt something positive by offering some perspectives on the matter, rather than just my own!  Here is one I find attractive:

“Spiritual guidance is being present in the moment, seeing and honouring the sacred mystery of the soul of another. It is witnessing this mystery and reflecting it back in word, prayer, thought, presence, and action. Spiritual guidance is modelling a deep relationship with the Divine and standing in faith and love with the other as that relationship unfolds. Spiritual guidance is a journey of deep healing and an affirmation of Holiness (wholeness), the Sacred, and the Mystery of all of life.”

Carol A. Fournier, MS, NCC, Interfaith Spiritual Director/Guide, Silver Dove Institute, Williston, Vermont, USA

(Carol A. Fournier.  “A Voice for Compassion and Wisdom:  Reflections on Interfaith Spiritual Direction.” (in publication, VT:2012))

I will continue to add to this strand in the journal every now and again.  I use the journal as my own note taking device, and it’s very handy to skim over on a mobile phone for a quick review of what has caught my attention.  I am not very good at note keeping on paper… Well, I am , but the notes get put on so many different surfaces and put in so many different places that they are impossible to track down!  I have sketchbooks which have become notebooks, random papers which have become folded into leaflet type documents, bookmarks which have become very important ideas records, only to become completely  lost in books which have also become lost!  Because space in our house is in short supply, I am finding that I tend to stuff things in whichever little crevice or nook I can find!

 

Painting

Nice quote:  “The best reason to paint is that there is no reason to paint.”—Keith Haring

Short and sweet, another little viewing of one of my much loved painters:

http://www.cvenard.com/the-painter/

The realisation that quite extreme and loose, free flowing  fragmentation in a painting could be attractive, valuable, beautiful, and interesting has never left me since discovering the paintings by Claude Venard.  I sometimes feel when I am painting with a high level of abstraction and drawing from my subconscious that I am very fortunate to be a painter in the time I am in, where I can look back and constantly locate numerous examples of fine painting with such ease on the internet.  It isn’t the same as seeing the painting in the flesh, but, it does a jolly good job of introducing ideas and approaches.  My London trips are a little less frequent now, because I have decided to spend more time painting and researching (and exercising, in an attempt to trim down my dear body a little more!) but I still look out for interesting exhibitions on a regular basis.

 

John Seed Interviews Sangram Majumdar

This isn’t new, but I have come back to it to mull.  The whole blog posting is a very good read, yet these words from Sangram Majumdar stood out for me in particular:

“The phenomena of Facebook and Twitter, is in line with the exponential nature of how we are able to find information in any form, any time. For me, choosing to be a painter is an intentional decision to work on the other side of this streaming data- the slower and the tangibility of direct human experience. But apart from being anachronistic or foolhardy, I am curious as to how our understanding of our own immediate lives, when slowed to the measure of a heartbeat, compares to our daily intake of virtual experiences. What is real?”

Read the whole blog entry which is titled “A Conversation with Sangram Majumdar” by John Seed

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-seed/sangram-majumdar_b_1344795.html

I’ve been thinking a bit about the contrast between the kind of instant clarity of information available to us now because of the age we live in,  and the contrast between this and the unknown, and un-knowable even…the mystery…much of which we find in the process of painting (and yes, spirituality)…it may be it’s very delight, and freedom.  This thrusting outwards but inwards at the same time.  This venture into experience which is realised, but not fixed in a way which ties it up.  It is a poetic thing, painting.

 

 

Well by the Foot of a Tree by Jenny Meehan, wellbeing mental health art therapy, west dean college, jenny meehan artist female painter semi abstract landscape, colourist expressionist process led landscape painting,

Well by the Foot of a Tree by Jenny Meehan

 

Painting “Road to Recovery/Well by the Foot of a Tree” is an example of some of my earlier painting. It’s oil on primed board.  I haven’t painted on board for a while, but will do so soon, as I like the surface very much!  This painting was one of the two I exhibited at All Saint’s Church in Kingston Upon Thames.   It is titled “Road to Recovery/Well by the Foot of a Tree”  I forgot to put in the more descriptive “Well by the Foot of a Tree” title on the work when it was on display at All Saint’s, so there is a very high chance that those looking at it would not have the faintest idea of what it depicts!  It was painted from a line sketch at West Dean College, so was a combination of imagination and external landscape.  My smaller paintings on board are normally around just £60 – £100.

Wholesome Quote

“Put your own work on view in your home and studio, where you must live with and confront it daily. If your images cannot nourish you and sustain your own interest at length, they are unlikely to be of use to anyone else”  (Coleman, A. D. Depth of Field. University of New Mexico Press, 1998)

Another wholesome quote from A. D Coleman.  I learn a lot from gazing at my work as it hangs in my studio and home space.   Art works need time, and a lot of it, if one is to get out of them something of what one has invested in the creation.   Yes,  I do get tired of them, and they need to be changed often.  However,  I find it helpful to review why I have done something the way I have, and it’s good use of time, as the critical reviewing can take place randomly and regularly.  It is also good to appreciate one’s own work.  There is nothing wrong with this… It’s not a pride thing at all, but a recognition of the purpose of what you have done…it’s value to yourself.   I can look back, for example at the painting above, “Road to Recovery/Well by the Foot of a Tree” and see it’s place in my developing direction artistically in a way which is very helpful…indicating which paths to follow and which to leave alone.   It’s only by constantly confronting your work, with eyes which have changed through time and experience, that you can make it useful to yourself and useful to the unfolding exploration which is the main stay of any artist’s work and even existence.

 

west dean gardens photograph, west dean sussex estate, west dean college garden, black and white garden photographs jenny meehan, foliage landscape photograph meehan

watering system in glass house at west dean gardens near chichester

 

Photographic Imagery – Jenny Meehan 

I love to play around with images.

Meditation

Quote taken from the following website:

http://www.wccm.org/content/what-meditation

“Open to all ways of wisdom but drawing directly from the early Christian teaching John Main summarised the practice in this simple way:

Sit down. Sit still with your back straight. Close your eyes lightly. Then interiorly, silently begin to recite a single word – a prayer word or mantra. We recommend the ancient Christian prayer-word “Maranatha”. Say it as four equal syllables. Breathe normally and give your full attention to the word as you say it, silently, gently, faithfully and above all – simply. The essence of meditation is simplicity. Stay with the same word during the whole meditation and from day to day. Don’t visualise but listen to the word as you say it. Let go of all thoughts (even good thoughts), images and other words. Don’t fight your distractions but let them go by saying your word faithfully, gently and attentively and returning to it immediately that you realise you have stopped saying or it or when your attention is wandering.

Silence means letting go of thoughts. Stillness means letting go of desire. Simplicity means letting go of self-analysis.

Meditate twice a day every day. This daily practice may take you sometime to develop. Be patient. When you give up start again. You will find that a weekly meditation group and a connection with a community may help you develop this discipline and allow the benefits and fruits of meditation to pervade your mind and every aspect of your life in ways that will teach and delight you. John Main said that ‘meditation verifies the truths of your faith in your own experience’

Meditation has the capacity to open up the common ground between all cultures and faiths today. What makes meditation Christian? Firstly the faith with which you meditate – some sense of personal connection with Jesus. Then the historical scriptural and theological tradition in which we meditate.

Another good site to look at:

http://www.contemplativeoutreach.org/christian-contemplative-tradition

 

Jenny Meehan is a painter, poet and Christian contemplative  based in East Surrey/South West London.
Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE occasionally offers art tuition for individuals or in shared sessions.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details as availability depends on other commitments.    

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings and other artwork forms  and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.  

I now have available selected prints from the “Signs of the Times” series, plus several other groups of photographic and digital imagery, available as poster prints through on my Photobox Gallery.  The Photobox Gallery is a handy facility for enabling people to buy my prints in a quick, easy and affordable way.  The prints I describe as “Poster Prints” because they are not signed and checked by me, but I am very confident about the quality.  They are in fact  A2 and A3 sized laser prints on Fujicolor Crystal Archive Paper (a silver halide colour paper, designed exclusively to produce high-image-quality colour prints on both analogue and digital printers).

Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

http://www.photoboxgallery.com/19507

There are other options for different types of printing on the Photobox Gallery, but at the present time I am restricting the distribution of my work over the Photobox Gallery to just A2 and A2 laser prints.   However, if you do want something specific, just contact me with your requirements and I am completely free, (thanks to not limiting these particular images to “limited edition”) to arrange to have prints made to varying specifications and to be signed and numbered.

Enquiries welcome.  I have more artwork than I can display on the internet, so let me know if you are looking for something specific in terms of style, function, or subject matter. 

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom.   To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s  bi-annual  mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date.

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

I would be very pleased if you would  choose to “follow” the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed of what I am up to this way.   Just press  the “follow” button and pop in your email address.  You determine how often you get updates and you don’t need a WordPress account to follow Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.  

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting

by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

Notice regarding my use of images on my Jenny Meehan Artist’s Journal blog:   I always try and contact the relevant artist if I include images of their work on my blog and make clear the source.  Where images are taken from other websites, I make it my practice to  cite the source and normally include a link to the place where the image was found.  When I include images I do so in the belief that this will not cause commercial harm to the copyright holder. I  believe that this is fair use  and does not infringe copyright.  Images are used in order for me to comment and reference them in relation to my own creative and artistic practice.  When I include extracts of text, I also do so with the understanding that again, this is permissible under the widely accepted fair usage terms with respect to copyright.

Outline of my “Fair Use”  rationale, which is applicable to all images from other sources which I include on this blog:
There is no alternative, public domain or free-copyrighted replacement image available to my knowledge.
Its inclusion in my blog adds significantly to my narrative  because it shows the subject which I want to refer to and relate to my own artistic practice and is necessary in order for me to communicate accurately my observations/critical appraisal/appreciation/educate my readers, in understanding my perspectives on art and life.  Inclusion is for information, education and analysis only. The text discussing the significance of the included  art work is enhanced by inclusion of the image. The image is a low resolution copy of the original work of such low quality that it will not affect potential sales of the art work.

 

My images:  Don’t use them without permission.  Contact me in the first instance.  Please.   If you wish to use them under the “Fair Use” it’s really nice for me to know you have found, like, and wish to comment on them.

Also:

Copyright for all works of art by Jenny Meehan is managed by the Design and Artists Copyright Society (DACS) in the UK. If you wish to licence a work of art by Jenny Meehan, please contact DACS as indicated below:
Design and Artist Copyright Society
33 Old Bethnal Green Road
London E2 6AA
Telephone: +44 (0) 20 7336 8811
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7336 8822
email: info@dacs.org.uk
website: http://www.dacs.org.uk

 

Oliver Mc Ternan – Finding Sense in a Complex World: The Need for a Spiritual Paradigm

Well, it is along way back now, but on Thursday 9th January I made my way to Westminster Cathedral Hall SW1P 0QJ for an event organised by “Silence in the City”.  (www.silenceinthecity.org.uk)  As part of my creative practice this year (and probably many years to come, I hope) I am going to invest more time into the practice of contemplative Christian centred prayer and meditation, and I was very pleased to find an organisation like Silence in the City who organise regular events with speakers and also with a time of silent prayer and reflection.    To my dismay, I realised I was pen and paperless, but tried out my mobile phone’s swipe facility for note taking.  Urm, it was good, very fast,  but problematic when it got the occasional word wrong!  Returning to correct some errors was essential, and this took a protracted amount of time.  However, I did manage to record a few things!  Silence in the City do produce recordings of the talks they host, so if you are interested then go to the www.silenceinthecity.org.uk website and enquire.  http://www.silenceinthecity.org.uk/

(My notes here are very piecemeal, and miss out huge chunks, particularly when I ended up fiddling around with the mis types of the swype!)

What I came away with, that which stays most prominently in my mind is the importance of keeping open communication with others even when we don’t agree, and the importance of patience and perseverance when there is a breakdown of communication and the potential for conflict.   Oliver is particularly involved in east west relations and conflict resolutions.  I also note his comments concerning the fact that religion has an ambiguity towards violence, and also that peace processes often fail because the religious factor has been ignored.  He stressed the need to understand religious motivations and adopt a mindset which can understand the other in the sacred spaces where we are able to connect with what we find in common.  People can have a spiritual sense of what life is about which is shared, even if there is disagreement over certain matters. There is always a place on a human level where we can connect with each other.    He also talked about how we have grown to privatise our faith, but that faith places an obligation on us to shape the world and to see that each person is able to live in the justice that God intended them to experience.   How we define our spirituality should not stop us responding with sensitivity and awareness to what is going on around us.  This is the real mark of the spiritual.   We tend to try and stay in our comfort zone but need to embrace the unpredictability of God.    It’s very easy to be tempted by reasonable arguments and a sense of righteousness which can stop us from relating with people on a human level.  We cannot circumvent the painful moments in the lives of others.  He noted that the spiritual framework can be symbolised very well in the sign of the cross…  the line travels both horizontally and vertically… relationally it is something which needs to happen both ways.  The divine and the human.

Contemplation  and Contemplation/Garden of Gethsemane 

contemplative pray,garden of Gethsemane, oil painting christian artist painter,spirituality painting expression,expressive abstraction, jenny meehan contemporary female painter

A recent painting… I am pleased with this as it seems to flow in a bit of a stream of my work which I feel runs true to the main current. It makes me feel the way I feel when I look at a painting by Corot, which is good with me, as I love his painting!

It’s on linen, 40x60cm in size, painted in oils. I soon begun to think along the lines of the Garden of Gethsemane, but kept the title more open. Gethsemane means literally “oil press” though, which I find an attractive thought. Maybe I will end up doing what I often do and giving it two titles!  So Contemplation/Garden of Gethsemane.   I think the title of a painting is very important, and sometimes emerges in phases.  I’m starting to rest on the two titles together.  On the one hand I like the title not to reveal too much, because I feel if someone wants it very much, then it would almost need them to re-title it, so what is the point of making the title more particular!  On the other hand, I feel it might be interesting to hint at the meaning of the work for me.  So the general and the particular in a title is good. 

Andy Goldsworthy 14 chalk stones  on the West Dean Estate and “Chalk Lump” painting

As time goes by, my own participation in psychoanalysis, more time spent working with painting, and more focus on centring myself firmly within my faith and Christ-centred contemplative practice, is all contributing to a much deeper and richer experience of life.  Still scattered with the same boulders, some within and some without. Thinking on the boulder, lump and stone theme makes me  think now of my painting “Chalk Lump” painted at West Dean College during a painting course taught by John T Freeman.  Here it is: 

Chalk Lump on West Dean Estate by Jenny Meehan, oil painting british 21st century, british female uk painter semi abstract,semi abstract ivon hitches influenced painting,romantic lyrical abstraction meehan,

Chalk Lump on West Dean Estate by Jenny Meehan
Oil on Canvas

I found out after painting this painting that  Andy Goldsworthy made 14 chalk stones of approximately 6 foot diameter and placed them in chosen locations along a five mile trail on the South Downs between West Dean Gardens and Cocking Hill. (in 2002 I think)  This painting was painted from (or rather, based very loosely!) on a sketch drawn from observation of the scene before me, as I looked out from the front of West Dean and over towards the chalk stone.  I have wondered if I should change the title to “Chalk Stone” to make the relationship with what it was based on clearer, but I like the “lump” because it expresses an emotional blockage and makes me think of a “lump in the throat”  and is therefore more accurate  in that respect.  I have other paintings of Andy Goldsworthy’s chalk stone at West Dean which I painted at that time and also afterwards, because as a motif I like it very much.  Something just there, incongruous but present.

A “lump in the throat” is described in medical terms as “globus”  and it used to describe the sensation of a lump in the throat where no true lump exists. It was once called Globus Hystericus,  and is sometimes also referred to as Globus pharyngeus.  It is related to many things, two of them being stress and tiredness. I am experiencing globus quite lot myself at the moment, and I do think emotional tension and trouble expressing grief and deep sadness may be related to it.  A kind of holding in of emotional tension which needs to be expressed.  Some people experience a lot of trauma in life, from a very young age,  and this can accumulate and cause problems later  if the emotions and thinking are not worked through and faced.  In the process of working through the tangle (via psychotherapy),  sometimes a backlog of grief builds up, and you feel it.  This is my thinking on the emotional “lump in the throat” matter.   It doesn’t worry me…I have learnt to embrace it as part of my experience, and I think, used in the right way, these odd ways our bodies express themselves can be helpful to us if we heed their complaining and act accordingly.  For me, it is more rest, less doing, more chance to allow my emotions to have their own say in things a bit more then they usually get as I rush from A to B and try and achieve more than I need to!

Concerning the  external “stones”, these things will always be here, things which block and get in the way of love, of truth, of the light. But maybe, with a commitment to the truth, to seeking truth, through living with as much integrity as we can, time will wear them down, and we, in some way, may help the process by choosing to love, in and through all.  

On the psychoanalysis/art topic, this looks great…  The text is from the Freud Museum  website and a few other places!

Psychoanalysis and Artistic Process

Grayson Perry in conversation with Valerie Sinason

A celebration of the launch of a Special Edition of Free Associations:  “The journal, Free Associations, is delighted to announce the launch of a special edition edited by Patricia Townsend on the theme of ‘Psychoanalysis and Artistic Process’”

Grayson Perry won the Turner Prize in 2003 and delivered the 2013 BBC Reith lectures. His major exhibition The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman was shown at the British Museum in 2011-12. He has exhibited his ceramics, sculptures, prints and textiles widely for 30 years and has also written a weekly arts column for the Times and made radio and television documentaries. Valerie Sinason is a poet, author, child and adult psychotherapist and adult psychoanalyst. She is Director of the Clinic for Dissociative Studies and Honorary Consultant Psychotherapist to the Cape Town Child Guidance Unit.

The Special Edition includes articles by Kenneth Wright, Lesley Caldwell, Sharon Kivland and Patricia Townsend, transcripts of talks by Grayson Perry, Martin Creed and Valerie Sinason and an afterword by Juliet Mitchell.

More information here:

 http://www.freud.org.uk/events/75386/psychoanalysis-and-artistic-process/

It’s fully booked now, so I have missed the boat.

The conference ‘Psychoanalysis and Artistic Process – a day of dialogues between artists and psychoanalysts’ took place on 25th February 2012 at University College London.

The speakers were:

Session 1: Kenneth Wright and Sharon Kivland
Session 2: Grayson Perry and Valerie Sinason
Session 3: Martin Creed and Lesley Caldwell

More here:  http://vimeo.com/user11474015

 

Artists Hiring Out Galleries versus Alternative Exhibition/Gallery Spaces

For those with the cash in their pocket to spend, it is possible to rent a gallery and many people do this.   Many galleries need to hire space out in order to run and it is part of their business.   Prices vary and I thought I would include this useful list for anyone who is fortunate enough to have the cash to spend on such a venture:

http://www.galleries.co.uk/g-ts2.htm

It’s worth bearing in mind that it is the space and the services of the gallery you get and usually that is pretty much it.  There may be a little advertising in the organisations existing framework, but it’s up to you to promote your work…So you still do the hard work.   And while giving you a nice platform to display yourself and your work,  and maybe a good venue address for your CV…and good experience of exhibiting…  it is possible to get experience of exhibiting your work in other ways, ie through open studios, art fairs,  and approaching restaurants, hotels, bars, theatres, community organisations and community centres, etc.     These alternative venues may not have the perceived “status” of a gallery in a London setting,  but everyone in the know knows which galleries are hired out to artists in this way, and so no extra value will be placed on your work by showing at a hired space.  The only possible benefit would be that it would demonstrate the way that you value your own work, which is a good thing, and also possibly that you have money to spend on such ventures.  It may also be perceived by those who know nothing of how this system works, as being an endorsement that your work is of particular worth.  So if you are in a position to do it, it is probably worth considering.  However, I wanted to add this into my journal because it is very easy to become disheartened if you are an artist with little or no disposable income…it is easy to feel that doors are closed to you if you don’t have the cash.  However, this is not the case, and one should persist in seeking open doors…They do exist, and if you look for opportunities to show and share what you do, they will come.  You seek them, and you offer your art as a service, which it is.  Be creative!

Arrogance Abounds….

Couldn’t resist showing this.  Sad.  Hard to imagine if this person is looking around them?

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/news/whats-the-biggest-problem-with-women-artists-none-of-them-can-actually-paint-says-georg-baselitz-8484019.html

Well, as a pleasant change and in order to read something more interesting and intelligent, take a look here:

http://www.thewhitereview.org/interviews/interview-with-tess-jaray/

Leatherhead Theatre “Sacred Spaces”  Exhibition 

Miyajima by Hilary Walker

Miyajima by Hilary Walker


Hilary Walker

I’ve been interested in photography for many years. I like the immediacy of a photograph and how it can tell a story. I think that the relationship between the image and the artist is a subtle one with photography; the photograph itself is often (but not always) very representational and perhaps could be seen as little to do with the artist compared to a painting or a drawing. However, the photographer is very influential in the final result. They choose the viewpoint of the photograph, the scale, colour intensity and contrast, the composition and the main focus of the image. Sometimes I manipulate the original a great deal so that it becomes an abstract piece. With these photographs I kept the realism to the fore to emphasise that this is not about the artist as such, more about the people who use these things to relate spiritually to their world

Forms created by animals and the natural world underlie most of Hilary’s work: in particular the way shape and colour interact with each other. She uses her photographs to create images that can range from naturalistic to highly abstract. Hilary embraces a very wide spectrum of ways to express her ideas creatively. She has produced work using acrylics, watercolour, etching and relief printing, pencil, photography, and most recently, the iPad.

“To me, it doesn’t really matter what medium I use; I don’t specialise in that way. If the medium is right for the idea I want to express or the effect I want to create then I use it, it’s as simple as that.”

She has always been inspired by Japan, both by its culture and the landscape itself. After visiting the country, she has created a portfolio of photographs to reflect the deeply spiritual nature of Japan, its people and culture. Hilary’s work can be found on her website: http://www.hilarywalker.co.uk


Icy Landscape - Jenny Meehan

Icy Landscape – Jenny Meehan

Jenny Meehan

The two process led paintings I am showing stem from my imagination, and reference both present and past visual and emotional experiences. The process of building up the painting is slow, which means on some days I might only add a couple of marks! The analytical reviewing of the works formal elements and time spent simply looking at the work to determine how it resonates emotionally is part of a contemplative practice requiring openness and reflection. This is true of all my paintings, even those more figurative, but especially so with non-objective or highly abstracted paintings. I draw on my own subconscious in an attempt to locate some of my most central concerns, emotions, and thinking. As the paintings develop, subject matter emerges, which you can see reflected in the titles.

I am also exhibiting a black and white digital print which is an example of another strand in my work through which I delight in the pattern and dramatic impact of the natural world and its forms, which ultimately initiate and enlighten the imagination for even the deepest inner thoughts and images.

Human experience, emotion, and my own personal life journey form the centre of my work. The brokenness of human experience fascinates me, as well as the potential for growth and renewal.

After a BA Honours (Literature) in 1994 and a PGCE in 1995 I taught in Primary Education. I now use teaching skills integrated with nine years experience as an artist to occasionally offer tuition in painting and drawing.  I am based in Chessington, Surrey, and I exhibit widely across the UK.

Painting is the main strand in my practice, but I am also involved in applied arts and design, digital imagery, printmaking and writing. I always seek creative and innovative ways to experiment with existing skills and knowledge. Curating and organising this exhibition on behalf of KAOS is part of my ongoing professional development. You can see more of my work and exhibition history on my website: www.jamartlondon.com  and read about my activities on my blog: http://www.jennymeehan.wordpress.com

art at leatherhead theatre KAOS kingston artists' open studios exhibition Geranium Johnsons Blue cyanotype by EmilyLimna

Geranium Johnsons Blue cyanotype by EmilyLimna

Emily Limna

In my original prints I combine hand with digital photographic techniques. I capture the beautiful details found in plant and flower structures through controlling light and composition. My methods include hand drawn monoprints, cyanotype sun prints and digital macro work.

I find the geometric patterns and structures found in flora fascinating. Representing these natural forms with intricate mark making and precise photographic techniques becomes a meditative process. Revealing tiny, hidden details through intricate, hand drawn studies and macro lenses emphasises the beauty found in even the simplest natural forms.

The three cyanotype prints shown are rooted in nature through both content and technique. I select natural forms for their structure and behaviour with light. The tiny veins in geranium petals glow with the backlit rays of sunlight. These sun prints are exposed in my garden. Some are direct photograms and others are using negative transparencies of my macro prints.

In a current project with a local writer I am creating a limited edition children’s book. My images for this publication playfully combine miniature figures and animals with the surrounding world.

Emily is also a teacher and examiner of Art, Design and Photography in London.

http://www.emilylimna.com

Well, “Sacred Spaces” is coming up in May, but for the present time I am having a little well earned break from the organisational tasks involved…I got those done early because I know how incessant it can all  seem.  Apart from a little bit of publicity,  I’m not needing to spend time on it right now.

Sacred Spaces Flyer by Jenny Meehan which promotes the Sacred Spaces Visual Art Exhibition at Leatherhead Theatre in May 2014 organised on behalf of KAOS (Kingston Artists' Open Studios)

Sacred Spaces Flyer by Jenny Meehan which promotes the Sacred Spaces Visual Art Exhibition at Leatherhead Theatre in May 2014 organised on behalf of KAOS (Kingston Artists’ Open Studios)

Which is GREAT!  I have some time to look at other peoples work a bit more!

Starting to invest more time in looking at Clyde Hopkins’ paintings

Before I start, I am no great writer, but writing is enjoyable to me, and at least attempts to put what seems, with painting, the mostly impossible into words…Well, it doesn’t do that,  it cannot, (thankfully) but it tries, in a clumsy way, to put logic this way and that, hopefully in an interesting manner.  I view writing about paintings as tempting, but always likely to miss the point, the point being ON the painting.  Something might be gained though by forcing my brain to use words as I look at a painting, even if what I say falls away, at least I will have invested the time in looking and thinking about it.  My brain is lazy.  It’s just a natural thing!  So over the next few journal posts, I will take the time to mull over Clyde Hopkins’ paintings.   So first comes:

Clyde Hopkins
Your Choice of Cereal (for Breakfast)
Painting
Oil on linen
Canvas size: 30 x 25cm

Copyright Clyde Hopkins

Well, that is kind.  My choice of cereal for breakfast.  In our house this is no small matter.  If your choice of cereal is not there, all hell breaks loose, it does, completely.  Maybe only slightly worse is the situation where there is a very small amount of cereal in the packet, but the person before you has scoffed pretty much all of the rest.  So the title, it relates.  How it relates to the painting will maybe need to remain something nice and personal to the painter himself, unless you happen to ask.  This is good.  It is kind.  It makes the start of my writing very simple.  And the painting is kind too.

The colour is kind.  Yes, colour can be kind.  It can relate respectfully to its surrounding colours, yet shine.  It can take up its room, and not trespass on someone else’s room.  This happens with this painting and it happens with all of Clyde’s paintings  (well, those I have seen (on the net) so far.  It is not easy to use so many colours when playing with space on the picture plane.  I have only just started to touch on what a skilful, sometimes painful,  task this can be.  So I am not surprised I find these paintings inspiring.  In my own painting I am tending to prefer soft edges rather than hard edges, but the undulations in this painting are just sufficient to relieve me of any “hard line stress” (invented term!)  that otherwise may creep into my mind as I look at them.

Those tiny little dots.  They call out “crafted”…We are applied, we are placed, with care.  They make a pleasing perceived and actual (though I cannot see from image, I am sure) texture.  It is great to have something hit the eye in this manner.  I think it has an energy of it’s own which works very effectively against the areas of flatter colour, though again, I suspect that, face to face, I would see a lot of what I am missing by just using an image.  There are other more subtle things going on.  But to have the obvious and heightened surface…to have it meet your eye in this way is a great visual sensation.  There are some patterns in this painting, but the regular areas both cover and reveal…they do this by being a covering but also making me think of the substrate underneath, in this case the linen.

More next post…

Baker Tilly in Guildford 

Here is another of the prints from the forthcoming exhibition at Baker Tilly in Guildford.

digital print buy abstract geometric Rush Hour - Jenny Meehan Signs of the Times Series

Rush Hour – Jenny Meehan Signs of the Times Series

I also now have available selected prints from the “Signs of the Times” series on my Photobox Gallery.  The Photobox Gallery is a handy facility for enabling people to buy my prints in a quick, easy and affordable way.  The prints I describe as “Poster Prints” because they are not signed and checked by me, but I am very confident about the quality.  They are in fact  A2 and A3 sized laser prints…So, they are photographic quality…by this, I mean they are printed on archival quality photographic paper using a chemical process, rather than ink-jet prints.  Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

Here is the link to my Photobox Gallery:

http://www.photoboxgallery.com/19507

There are other options for different types of prints on the Photobox Gallery, but at the present time I am restricting the distribution of my work over the Photobox Gallery to just A2 and A2  prints.   However, if you do want something specific, just contact me with your requirements and I am completely free, (thanks to not limiting these images to “limited edition”) to arrange to have prints made to varying specifications and to be signed and numbered.  Prints which come from me personally are signed and numbered, even though not limited in number.

The laminated and mounted  prints which will be on show at Baker Tilly are signed on reverse with both my signatures.  I have two signatures, one is a combination of my initials and the other my usual signature which I use in daily life.  I tend to sign paintings just with the combination of my initials and prints with both.  I also sign my paintings on the back, as I don’t like to put marks on the front of my work.  Sometimes I do with drawings.  But it depends on the work.  I always use my initials signature, for all my work now.  I like the way it can be used on any material, for example, clay and even stone, quite easily.

Jenny Meehan is a painter and designer based in East Surrey/South West London.
Her website is www.jamartlondon.com.  (www.jamartlondon.com replaces the older now deceased website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk)

Jenny Meehan BA Hons (Lit.) PGCE also offers art tuition.  Please contact Jenny at j.meehan@tesco.net or through the contact form at www.jamartlondon.com for further details.   Commissions for paintings are also undertaken at affordable prices.

 Jenny Meehan works mainly with either oils or acrylics  creating both abstract/non-objective paintings  and also semi-abstract work.  She also produces representational/figurative artwork,  mostly using digital photography/image manipulation software, painting and  drawing.  Both original fine paintings and other artwork forms (prices ranging from between £60 and £700) and affordable photo-mechanically produced prints are available to purchase.

Enquiries welcome.  I have more artwork than I can display on the internet, so let me know if you are looking for something specific in terms of style, function, or subject matter. 

Jenny Meehan exhibits around the United Kingdom and holds regular Open Studio/Studio Sale events.  To be placed on Jenny Meehan’s bi-annual  mailing list please email j.meehan@tesco.net requesting to be kept up to date.

Also, you could follow the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed that way. 

Note About Following Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal 

I would be very pleased if you would  choose to “follow” the Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal at WordPress and keep informed of what I am up to this way.   Just press  the “follow” button and pop in your email address.  You determine how often you get updates and you don’t need a WordPress account to follow Jenny Meehan Contemporary Artist’s Journal.  I don’t have a Facebook page as yet, and won’t be on Twitter.  So this is the best way to follow my art practice.  Though I ramble on, I try to organise things for easy skimming, so you can pick and choose according to your own interests quite easily!    

You tube video with examples of photography, drawing and painting

by Jenny Meehan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAXqzMIaF5k

Website Link for jamartlondon:  www.jamartlondon.com 

Digital photography can be viewed on http://www.photographyblog.com/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=5491

Notice regarding my use of images on my Jenny Meehan Artist’s Journal blog:   I always try and contact the relevant artist if I include images of their work on my blog and make clear the source.  Where images are taken from other websites, I make it my practice to  cite the source and normally include a link to the place where the image was found.  When I include images I do so in the belief that this will not cause commercial harm to the copyright holder. I  believe that this is fair use  and does not infringe copyright.  Images are used in order for me to comment and reference them in relation to my own creative and artistic practice.  When I include extracts of text, I also do so with the understanding that again, this is permissible under the widely accepted fair usage terms with respect to copyright.

Well, it was an eclectic mixture of work with plenty of interesting artist’s to research.  My favourite work was by the London based artist Lesley Hilling.  On her website is a delightful video of her studio, which looks amazing!  For more on Lesley Hilling see   http://www.lesleyhilling.co.uk/information  

The work on show was enchanting to look at, possessing integrity and beauty… quite captivating.

The work on show at “Lines” was Darkwood Days Wood, a mixed media work, with dimensions of 29cm x 28cm x 17cm

The blurb…

“Lesley Hilling is a London based artist who makes sculptural collages from a wide range of recycled materials that take the form of box constructions, walls, towers and spheres. Obsessive joinery is merged with a confusion of disparate elements, structured in a complex but ordered whole. Her work conveys a powerful sense of longing to preserve the fragments of the past, a desire for order, a passionate and mysterious evocation of lost moments.”

But best of all take a look at the image, and if possible, go and see the work “in the flesh”.  There’s a good image of it here:

http://www.advertisingexhibitions.co.uk/artist_lesley_hilling.html

My work “London Downpour” needed to be viewed from a greater distance, however, due to the narrow dimensions of most of the lower part of the gallery, this was not possible.   Because it was an experiment with colour and space, it’s tricky to view from close up.  When I was painting it, well, indeed, when I was painting all of the process-led paintings last year, I found I had to stand at least 6 metres away to work out what was happening with the colour-space relationships.  With little obvious pictorial structure to rely upon, and the structure only establishing itself in a gradual and piecemeal fashion, the distance was vital.  I think it could be viewed in a OK way from about three metres.  However, it must have been quite a challenge to place the works in the Strand Gallery, as there are lots of angles, corners, and different proportions of wall, so I think bearing in mind the constraints an excellent job was done, and the exhibition looked really good.  To hang so much work by very different artists in a pretty restricted space is not something I would want to have to do!  I found hanging the work of three artists along a flat wall at Leatherhead Theatre quite enough to orchestrate.  So my hearty “Congratulations” to the organisers of the show, including of course Jack Smurthwaite who curated the exhibition.

Here’s the image of “London Downpour” in situ.

London Downpour- Jenny Meehan painting abstraction at The Strand Gallery London as part of "Lines" visual art exhibition, jenny meehan jamartlondon london downpour process led painting british contemporary female abstract expressionistic painting, claude venard style work of london southbank tate modern river thames,contemporary emerging artist exhibition london.

London Downpour- Jenny Meehan painting abstraction at The Strand Gallery London as part of “Lines” visual art exhibition. Lyrical and geometric abstraction painting southbank london from the imagination! painted in a process-led, intuitive guided fashion, external impressions from regular trips to London appear to have seeped into my subconscious!

I love meeting people and the Private View was an enjoyable event.  I also love tonic water, and as I don’t drink alcohol, I passed on the gin and drunk only the tonic water, which was very nice and flavoursome indeed!   Wish I had had more.  It was exceptionally HOT in the gallery and refreshment was much needed.  It was interesting having come to the Private View directly from a visit to the National Gallery.  Having bathed myself in some amazing paintings, the creation of which, I realise day by day, my heart finds most interest in, and which hold a most lasting impression, I think to  myself that it is true that any artist should constantly hold themselves against the work which has hung on walls for a long time,  and continue to assess what they do in the light of the past, which, though it might seem  backward to some minds,  actually holds within it’s aged hands, the very keys to the future.  History. Maybe the greatest teacher to any forward thinking person?

I am taking some time right now to review some past drawings which I worked at during a Life Drawing Weekend Short Course at West Dean College, Near Chichester, Sussex.  I am very grateful for all the  training I get from my visits to West Dean and my participation in various short courses at West Dean College now stretches back over a period of nine years…Something I can hardly believe!  Initially working with sculpture (which I still love) I have found in the high standard of tuition and the amazing opportunity to learn from experienced creative practitioners a wonderful solution to the problem of meeting my needs for training.  I am now very much thinking that it is a blessing that I did my degree in Literature and not Fine Art, as I find my interest in words and image complement each other very well indeed.  Due to increased financial constraints (mostly due to rising energy bills and rising costs of pretty much everything!)  I find now I must restrict my training opportunities and I have resigned myself to the understanding that from now on it will be one, very short course, probably about once every two years from now on.   However, I have much material and ideas accumulated, and I will not go short in the sense that my creativity will not suffer because of this.  I also think I have such a strong sense of direction now, that maybe it will be fitting to steam ahead with little input (apart from the regular exposure to all kinds of wonderful artworks which I encounter in my regular trips to London).  I have tried applying for a couple of residencies this year, but nothing came of that, and the work involved in applying is considerable.

So, some lines of another kind, here in some recent life drawing examples.  The length of pose varies from very quick, say, just a few minutes, to the longer pose. Quality is variable, I haven’t posted up here as fine examples, rather reference.  There are some interesting things going on, and it has been good to “retune” my eyes, which have become somewhat lazy through lack of observational study.  I will take some of this work to develop I think.  Some of the drawings have quite a nice feeling to them, and I do like working with charcoal more than pencil I have found.  I am most grateful to Valerie Wiffen for her valuable input, which I will carry with me into further observational drawings in the future.

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

  example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

example of observational figure studies carried out at west dean college by jenny meehan exploring female figure, line,gesture, emotion and female form, jenny meehan

non objective lyrical romantic abstraction fine painting visual art british contemporary

“Pillar and Moon” Acrylic paint, various mediums, pigments,  glass beads, sand, fillers.   50 x 70cm on canvas.

It’s interesting to see the influence of past paintings I have spent time with emerging in my current experiments with paint.   Paul Nash is someone whose work I greatly admire.  His use of colour, the romantic feeling, the application of paint, his subject matter.  It’s all very very good.

I’m wondering where I can go and see more of Peter Lanyon’s paintings, and make a note of that today, adding to the rather long list of things I want to research.  I’m getting increasingly used to not being able to keep up with myself, and my acceptance of this tension being “just there”, and something I don’t have to stress out about, is kind of helpful.  Maybe I should use a sketch book more, and just jot things down.  Relieve myself of them quickly, and trust that they will return another day, when I am older and wiser and know what to do with them.

Once again, I am looking at Clevedon Bandstand painted by Peter Lanyon (1964) and Clevedon Night by Peter Lanyon (1964) and getting something from them I don’t bother to define with words, but which is surely speaking something to me, which seems to be going in somewhere.  Which leads me to think that maybe we have a little too much emphasis on  the  Logos.   Because of my own faith, I’m quite interested in the relationship between the visual arts and the Christian faith, and was fortunate enough to stumble on an essay by Penelope Brook, an extract of which I ponder on again:

“The early apologist, Justin Martyr developed one strand of early Christology that became formative in the Church’s attitude to visual imaging: Logos or Word-Flesh Christology.  Because it expressed the two natures of Christ in philosophical terms that could be readily understood within Hellenism, the apologists, in their Christological formation, became preoccupied by the Logos.  Drawing on notions from Greek philosophy and Judaism, Justin Martyr deveoped the concept of Christ as Logos: the revelation of God as the source of all knowledge. The Western Church developed a more literal than philosophical position to the Logos: Christ as Logos meant Christ revealed in the written and proclaimed word: the scriptures and sacraments.  The Eastern Church’s position was more philosophical and incarnational in basis: Christ as Logos meant Christ the proclaimed, written and imaged word.(my italics)  The Eastern Church viewed the visual image, like the scriptures and sacraments, as a valid and effective vehicle or revelation: a door to the sacred.  Overall, the Eastern Church tended to be more philosophical and spiritual in its theologizing and the West more legalistic and literal”   ( She has noted her reference as L.Ouspensky, and v Lossky, The Meaning of Icons (New York: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 1994, 9-22)

I don’t tend to find an awful lot written on this subject, so it was encouraging to find the above, so well put, and timely for me, as I push on with my own work. Unfortunately there are some people who don’t see creative expression of being of much value, unless it is explicitly Christian, by which they mean, (I think?), that is has a cross or an image from a bible story in it.  This is rather a shame, as my life so far has consisted of more than a cross and images from the bible, and I would be worried if that was the only avenue of expression open to me as a person.  It seems also that our Creator has chosen a much greater variety of forms too, to express Himself through, like people and life and creation. So often, and so well, clarified at times, in the creative arts.

Just recieved some information via email on the following, which looks very interesting and I hope to get along to it:

SEMINAR: Sacred Traditions and the Arts
Tuesday 12 June 2012, 18.00 – 19.30 Inigo Rooms, Somerset House (Large Seminar Room SW-1.12) NB: This is in the newly refurbished King’s section of Somerset House and the room is on the lower ground floor.
Speakers: Professor John Milner (The Courtauld Institute of Art) Dr Aaron Rosen (King’s College London)
The inaugural seminar to explore Sacred Traditions and the Arts is a joint venture between the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at King’s and The Courtauld. It seeks to place researchers in dialogue who are working on any aspect of the sacred and visual culture. It is open to all scholars and students who have an interest in exploring the intersections of religion and art regardless of period, geography or tradition.
On 12 June, Professor John Milner will speak on The Godless and the Ikon: Soviet Materialism in Sacred Forms. Dr Aaron Rosen will then present a paper entitled Jewish Artists/Christian Spaces: Mark Rothko and Louise Nevelson. This pairing explores and complicates notions of sacred experience in relation to modern spaces and identity in Russia and the United States in the twentieth century.

I have titled the following painting “Living Water” because I find painting is very much a source of refreshment and revitalisation to me, (as the Holy Spirit is) and for me the two very often flow together.

non objective lyrical abstraction contemporary british fine painting

Thinking about water, I’m rather immersing myself right now!

 

I fancy making a more ridiculously long title, but this will do for now.

Just put a video on YouTube of the exhibition currently running at Leatherhead Theatre.  Do come along and see it.  Nice cafe opposite the theatre too.  There are 40 works on show, not all of them are included in the video, as there is also work hung in the Mezz Bar area.  The hanging went well.  Ideally I would have liked a little more space in between the pieces, but as we had a lot of work it was a bit of a squeeze. 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5ZPhgA8CcA

As I am now up in London a couple of times a week, I am taking the opportunity to visit various galleries and see exhibitions, and en route to my destination I pass by Llewellyn Alexander (Fine Paintings) Ltd.  This is very handy as I have gained a lot from my time spent looking at the last two exhibitions and I intend to continue my visits.  While my own painting mainly non representational right now, I do love subject matter of the more obvious and external kind, and through looking at the work of other accomplished painters with more experience than myself, I am getting a strong sense of what exactly I value and admire, both in terms of emotional and psychological content as well as formal features. 

 I enjoyed some excellent paintings by Jeremy Barlow recently.  I don’t like busy street scenes and cafe scenes at all, and so I was surprised to find myself drawn INTO the gallery.   I had spotted some of  the quiet, soft and sensitively painted landscapes, blissfully free of crowds of people, and also some quite magical paintings of Venice with a kind of psychological depth which I always find attractive. 

I have also seen the exhibition at Hauser and Wirth, London W1J 9DY.  I have often admired Joan Mitchell’s painting and the exhibition “The Last Paintings”  was time well spent.  I enjoyed the scale of the paintings.  I am sad I do not have the facilities to make wall size paintings (what size is a wall?!) because I think with the non objective painting I’m busy with right now, it would be very interesting to try something out on a large scale.   

See: http://abstractcritical.com/2012/01/joan-mitchell-the-last-paintings/

and http://www.hauserwirth.com/exhibitions/1223/joan-mitchell-the-last-paintings/view/

 I am starting to think of a body of non-objective painting through which I can really throw myself about and achieve the satisfaction of experimenting without any restraint.  Sounds good, but, well, not quite true, because I find restraint is the very necessary ingredient to make a visually cohesive expressionistic work, so maybe that is the wrong word.  Rather, I will have some space, and within that space, establish the limitations required, without narrowing down the elements I experiment with. Well, that’s the aim anyway.  Thankfully, a nice opportunity has presented itself to exhibit some non objective paintings at Allied Healthcare in Chessington for three months from September this year.  A fine white wall is available, and I look forward to seeing some paintings hopefully breathing on it!

Enjoy a read from time to time:

http://www.axisweb.org/dlFULL.aspx?ESSAYID=17

Cross to find I have missed this exhibition, but the video was excellent.  I seem to be managing to feed myself intellectually right now. 

http://abstractcritical.com/2012/03/danny-rolph-michael-stubbs/

As the children are getting older, it is becoming more possible to spend longer blocks of time in the studio and this has meant that I am also listening to a lot more music.  It does stop things from getting too intense to have music on while painting.  Particularly enjoying listening to my husband’s “Trent – Live at Spring Harvest” CD right now, and singing along to my favourite song “Perfect Sacrifice”.   

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jievt_72IKA&feature=related

While rather tired from the effort involved in the last few weeks with the painting and drawing exhibition at Leatherhead Theatre “Some Kind of Narrative…” I still had the energy yesterday to pull together a poster for it, to go on the outside of Leatherhead Theatre so that passers by know that it is there.  I am quite pleased with it, bearing in mind it was a last minute effort and done rather quickly.   Amazing what you can do with Photoshop. Here it is:

Enjoying the sunshine.   It’s excellent for drying acrylic paint quickly and this has been fantastic for me as I have started working on some non objective paintings in acrylic on canvas to be displayed from September 2012 onwards.  Before that though is the joint exhibition of  painting and drawing at Leatherhead Theatre.  It runs at the same time as the Drama Festival, which means that a lot of people will see it. 

 All are welcome to the Opening Night on Saturday 28th April 2012.  It’s from 6pm until 9pm.  Visiting Information: Leatherhead Theatre 7 Church Street, Leatherhead, Surrey Kt22 8DN Tel 01372 365141.  Email me at j.meehan@tesco.net if you would like  more details of the exhibition and/or visiting information. We have used some representational painting for the flyer, but the exhibition is a mixture of both non-objective and representational work.

Oh!  Just found this today!

http://painters-table.com/

Looks as if it has lots of interesting links to follow.

“Fallen”  Oil on canvas.  Painted in 2010 which is a while back now.

I’ve started writing a book.  Not sure if anything will come of it, but I like writing so I hope to keep it up. I think it might be better than writing too much about individual paintings, and rather than treating work in isolation, it will place (some of them)  in their context within the narrative which I guess is my life. Even the most abstract painting is part of a narrative. Thinking of narratives, here is the flyer for the exhibition coming up in April/May 2012.  It’s a while away, but time flies.

 

 

Edit note:  My old website http://www.jennymeehan.co.uk is no longer living, so if you would like to see what I am doing currently, then please follow the link to my new website which is http://www.jamartlondon.com.   www.jamartlondon.com

 

Made time today to enjoy my book “Ivon Hitchens” by Peter Khoroche.   My favourite eye resting place today was “Summer Water, Morning 1961”.   Had a little peep at John Hitchens’ website, intrigued to find out what his son’s paintings are like.  I liked what I saw on the site..Abstract landscapes, confident, interesting.  Also found a good source of  fodder for browsing through in the BBC website “Your Paintings”.  See http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/

As I swing in my mind between the virtues of painting from life (the outer kind) and painting from life (the inner kind) I wonder if I waste my time with the dilemma; I suspect that I do.  This is not helpful. What does it matter?  I suspect also that it is too much concern with the reception of my painting, and too little concern with faithfulness to my inner drive.  Looking through my Hitchens book is always helpful to me in this respect, as I see the paintings do not suffer the concerns of others, but only the person who painted them, and this is exactly the way that it should be.

I am in that funny place just before an exhibition.  I have abandoned all hope (this always happens!) and feel flung into the pointlessness of it all.  This might sound bad, but I am getting used to it.  It’s almost routine.  I understand that Picasso felt so bad sometimes about his work that he refused to attend some of his own exhibitions, and if he felt like that about his work, then I am pleased to feel the way I do about mine.  

It will pass.

 

 

 

Trip on Saturday to Wimbledon Art Studios was very interesting.  I realise how important it is to follow your own unique direction, though this takes some nerve.   Words are really a waste of space when it comes to painting.  So that is enough said for today.

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