Temporary Studio Space!

 

jenny meehan

 

I am delighted to now be sitting in a studio space!  It is miles easier than working at home, and though I can only afford to rent it for one month, I know I will make the most of it.  Having a dedicated space for art working is very helpful and does induce some new opportunities.  Even being able to leave things out is productive.

The studio tent is too cold right now in November.  Though it’s excellent in the Summer to work outside, it’s not possible at this time of year.  The kitchen table at home is often another place I work on, but that too has it’s limitations.

If you would like to assist me in funding a studio space, then please do make an offering through my paypal me page.  Studio spaces cost around 200 to 350 per month and that’s out of my league at the moment.

Pop the following in your browser:

paypal.me/jennymeehan  and just follow the instructions putting in the amount you would like to gift to me.

Another way to help me financially is to buy my work.  I have plenty, ranging from original paintings to open edition or numbered and signed prints.  Just contact me via the contact form on my website if you are looking for something particular.  I also have an instagram account which is an excellent way of seeing a range of my art working in  quick and easy way.

My instagram is jamartlondon_jennymeehan

So what will I be doing in this studio space…?  I am bouncing several ideas around.  I have several ideas, but the main point is to have the freedom to experiment.  However, a big plus which I will be enjoying,  is that I have a big wall and so I will be able to work on a bigger scale than I have previously done, and have the experience of painting on a large scale while standing up, as normally I have my paintings on the ground.

 

brick wall, studio space, visual art jenny meehan jamartlondon


Here is a place to hit my head against a brick wall. Very useful!
https://www.instagram.com/jamartlondon_jennymeehan/

 

Interestingly it was a wall which I discovered in my wanderings through the rear access roads of Chessington many years ago which served as an incentive to start to paint and explore paint and substrates in more depth.

wall painting ©jenny meehan

©Jenny Meehan
jennymeehan.wordpress.com
instagram.com/jamartlondon_jennymeehan
jamartlondon.com

Someone had painted it as above which I loved.

 

Which Paints?

I have brought along with me a few acrylic paints and some Sol- Silicate paint.  I prefer my Keim paint to any other, and the pigments used I much prefer, but I have brought along some acrylic paints as well.

I tend to favour the use of inorganic pigments in my painting.  Its a route I started to travel on after completing a mural using silicate mineral paint and I continue to work with silica sol paints in particular.   These incorporate earth and mineral pigments which are produced in simple chemical processes.  They are also permanent with great lightfastness. So no worries about fading over time.

Today organic synthesis chemistry offers a virtually endless number of artificial colouring substances.  They are all secondary products of crude oil with the corresponding high loads on the environment when being produced and disposed of.  I prefer the traditional mineral and earth pigments.  I find when I do use others,  I have to tone them down and knock them back by huge amounts.  The one area where I do enjoy the cruder, wilder, synthetic colours is when used in dye sublimation printing,  and if suitable, I enjoying translating some of my digital imagery onto fabric.

But I have brought along a few, though I suspect I may be muting them considerably!

 

Backwards is the new Forwards

Part of my practice as a visual artist to reflect, recall and remember.

When it get’s to this time of year I do tend to look backwards.

One of the highlights for me was having my re-design of the International Access Symbol accepted and shown as part of the Shape Arts Open Exhibition this year.

Mainly because it was exactly the right place for something like this to be shown.  And because this piece of art /design is the fruit of my own personal experience with using disabled facilities because of personal need.

 

 

 

ISA international access jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved 2019, new access symbol designed,inclusivity,disabled equality,new symbol design graphic,jenny meehan,jamartlondon,

ISA international access jenny meehan © Jenny Meehan. All Rights Reserved 2019,

 

Inclusive Re-design of the International Symbol of Access (ISA) by Jenny Meehan © 2019 All Rights Reserved

Above you can see some of the fruit of my labour! The labours of my life!

My re-design of the International Symbol of Access  retains the buoyant feeling so important in “No Problem/Moving On” ) I designed this symbol in February 2019 with clear concepts in mind. My own experience of temporary disability before and after knee replacement surgery certainly inspired me to work on an alternative symbol to the International Symbol of Access. I got sick of the sight of the wheelchair symbol!

But I want to know from many people who face disability of different kinds what it expresses for you personally. Having knee replacement surgery and the reasons for that have changed my and awareness, but I have also been reminded that for a lot of people they have mobility restricted long term.  Is a redesign of the International Symbol of Access (ISA) needed? What do you think?

My design came from personal experience. I felt uncomfortable using disabled toilets marked with the wheelchair symbol but I needed to use them. It made me think about the essential elements I felt should be conveyed in the symbol. You see the circle, previously a wheel, transformed into an opening. You see the right angle, previously a seat transformed into the outstretched arms. You are accommodated. It’s a person centred design with a clear message of inclusiveness which is key. Having my own less visible, temporary, experience of difficulties and restrictions of mobility I hope my expression in this design conveys something positive and affirming.

There is also an expression of a person coming through, forwards and upwards and outwards. I can identify with that… I have certainly been on a journey with my own mobility.  (One which slightly continues, as still with osteoarthritis and also my un-operated knee does affect me.) But I don’t need to use disabled toilets any more for the time being at least.

When I look at the wheelchair symbol it makes me think how many people it misses out.  It reminds me of how differently I was treated when I was using a stick and/or a crutch (not always favourable, by the way!) and also reminds me that though the tools and objects we can use to help us are important, they can get in the way when it comes to perceptions other people have of us as PEOPLE, first and foremost.

To celebrate the inclusion of my re-design of the International Symbol of Access in the Shape Open Exhibition 2019 I am making merchandise available on Redbubble.com so that if this symbol resonates with you, you can access it on printed products!

You can get those here:

https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/works/41002650-jenny-meehans-redesign-of-the-international-symbol-of-access-shape-open-art-2019?c=389187-jenny-meehan-surface-pattern-and-clothing-designs

I would really value your thoughts and experiences though so contact me via jamartlondon.com or in the comments of this blog.

One of my favourite products using my design on Redbubble.com is the clock.  The reason for this being that with time things do change.  Also time can change anyone’s situation.  I didn’t expect to experience mobility difficulties and restrictions, but in time I did.  Also things may change for me in the future.  We all take what we have for granted.  It’s a good practice to think beyond what we know.  And things do change.

I think the wheelchair symbol should change, but no doubt any change is fraught with restrictions, and so many countries would be involved and so many approvals made, that it may never happen.  However, this doesn’t mean it’s not important to think, talk about, and envision.  It’s a tool for conversation ,thoughts and sharing experiences at the very least I hope.

My design is also published in the catalogue from Shape Arts Open Exhibition 2019 which you can buy from Shape Arts.

There was a fantastic selection of art on show.

Here is general info on ShapeArts:

https://www.shapearts.org.uk/pages/news/category/shape-open

 

Black and White – Humanizing Medicine at Barts Pathology Museum

I’m really into black and white at the moment!

I have a long standing interest in healthcare…Started years ago when I worked as a Dental Nurse and has never gone away!  I was very pleased to find out about the “Humanizing Medicine” call out for artists.

Being Human: A Festival of the Humanities was held at Bart’s Pathology Museum on Tuesday 19th November 2019 5.30 – 7.30pm  It was a truly fascinating place!  I loved it.  Photography of specimens is not allowed, but seeing them and hearing about them was an amazing experience.

 

barts pathology museum art exhibition jamartlondon jenny meehan humanizing medicine art and poetry exhibition as part of the Being Human festival

barts pathology museum art exhibition jamartlondon jenny meehan humanizing medicine art and poetry exhibition as part of the Being Human festival

 

barts pathology museum art exhibition jamartlondon jenny meehan humanizing medicine art and poetry exhibition as part of the Being Human festival

barts pathology museum art exhibition jamartlondon jenny meehan humanizing medicine art and poetry exhibition as part of the Being Human festival

 

barts pathology museum art exhibition jamartlondon jenny meehan being human humanities festival

barts pathology museum art exhibition jamartlondon jenny meehan

 

arthritis, humanising healthcare art, jenny meehan, jamartlondon,barts pathology museum exhibition, butterfly art,

arthritis, humanising healthcare art, jenny meehan, jamartlondon,barts pathology museum exhibition, butterfly art,

 

arthritis, humanising healthcare art, jenny meehan, jamartlondon,barts pathology museum exhibition, butterfly art,

arthritis, humanising healthcare art, jenny meehan, jamartlondon,barts pathology museum exhibition, butterfly art,

 

It was a celebration of the human side of medicine…Holding an art exhibition is such a great way to do this!

There are many amazing specimens to see.  Here is a taster:

https://www.qmul.ac.uk/pathologymuseum/specimens/

Butterfly Net Image and Poem – For the Humanising Medicine Exhibition

I experience pain due to osteoarthritis and some days it’s quite bad!
As soon as I heard about this I sat down and created something based on my own experience.
I wanted to express the sense of fragility that comes from not knowing how things will be day to day with health, and Butterfly Net seemed the right way to do it as in the process of making it by tearing the strips I experienced the very pain that makes a”bad day” a bad day.
However, in creating it, I have chosen to utilise the experience. As with much of my art work, I use my own writing.  The two pieces should be displayed together.  On one day I may be able to tear paper, on another, I may not.  However, I can type instead. Having them together conveys a little aspect of what life can be like with any kind of health condition I think.  One day you can do something, another day you cannot.
I chose a very simplistic image of a butterfly which I made by cutting paper and resting it unstuck on another piece of paper. This emphasizes fragility…There’s nothing holding the pieces together.
I was also thinking very much that though I associate arthritis with something which affects people in their latter years, because of my own experience with osteoarthritis, yet I realize there are many people affected by different types of bone pain who are much younger/children.
For example,  there is Juvenile arthritis…a disease in which there is inflammation of the synovium in  children of 16 years or younger.  It’s an autoimmune disease.
Choosing a childlike rendition of a butterfly reminds us that arthritis isn’t something just experienced by older people.
It’s also a condition which isn’t obvious… There is something of it being a condition which is less visible and in the dark, or shadows.  And I was also thinking of the shadows on Xray images too!
:
arthritis, humanising healthcare art, jenny meehan, jamartlondon,barts pathology museum exhibition, butterfly art,

arthritis, humanising healthcare art, jenny meehan, jamartlondon,barts pathology museum exhibition, butterfly art,

https://www.qmul.ac.uk/pathologymuseum/about/
Text from website:

“Barts Pathology Museum is based in St Bartholomews Hospital at West Smithfield and houses over 5,000 medical specimens on display over 3 mezzanine levels of the Victorian museum.

Prior to the appointment of the current Technical Curator, Barts Pathology Museum was in a state of disarray. As medical teaching changed, the need for the study of anatomy and pathology pots declined.

Without funding the specimens and the infrastructure of the building suffered and it wasn’t until a couple of years ago that a donation was secured to renovate the collection. Grant funding was provided by The Medical College of Saint Bartholomew’s Hospital Trust, a registered charity that promotes and advances medical and dental education and research at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Events were originally scheduled for after the completion of this project but the museum has opened slightly earlier than expected due to its physical arrangement. The conservation and cataloguing still continue.”

and

Barts Pathology Museum, a part of Queen Mary University of London , is a medical-humanities hub and venue for public engagement and education. Our events showcase research and the arts from our own institution as well as other universities, independent researchers and other museums. Our activities are in accordance with Human Tissue Authority recommendations on Public Display of medical collections and the University Museums Group guidance, and are sensitive to the dignity of the collection.

 

Ant Parade by Jenny Meehan

 

ant parade by jenny meehan , surface pattern design, bugs, insects, ants,

ant parade by jenny meehan ©jenny meehan all rights reserved

 

I have this work back now after it was exhibited as part of the North Pennines AONB Partnership’s Cold-blooded and Spineless project  Subterraneous exhibition. Subterraneous is part of an AONB Partnership project and Cold-blooded and Spineless was funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.  It was great to be part of that and it looked excellent.

I have used the base design which was exhibited and developed it a little so that it is available via Redbubble.com.

https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/works/41294343-ant-parade-abstract-repeating-design-by-jenny-meehan?card_size=4×6&p=greeting-card&rbs=845edcfa-99a0-4814-a3aa-f1d3a0f01f18&ref=available_products

Above is the link to the Greetings Card, but its available on 32 products and in different colour ways.  Buying merchandise with my designs on gives me a small royalty percentage which I use towards the continuation of my creative project, so do please purchase something if you like it.  It’s a great way to get something unique and support an artist at the same time.  Items are not sold in large amounts… There are so many talented artists on Redbubble.com, which is great.  So if you want to collect some examples of my work in an easy and affordable way, then buying examples from Redbubble might be a way of doing so.  Items are not signed by me, of course, but does this matter?  In the end, if you like my work and you want it, I want you to have it, in the easiest and most affordable way.  Yes, I sell my original paintings for much more, but I don’t think any false idea of exclusivity has any place in what I do.

 

Down Memory Lane

 

 

Down Port Hill,

Kentisbury.

It was just “the lane”.

We rode our bikes, me and my brother,

down the lane held into the beautiful hedgerow.

 

The china in Preston Cottage was (I discovered later) designed by Alfred Meakin.

“Hedgerow”

I made sure I had a milk jug as an adult, of the same design

because from it’s lip

spoke fond memory

Of time.

 

Time

when you and me could play,

putting our hands into waters

which leapt over

all obstacles

merrily.

 

 

preston cottage port hill kentisbury exmoor north devon

preston cottage port hill kentisbury exmoor north devon

 

Bottom left image is of Preston Cottage, which I think is still now called “Next Week” in 2012.  Other images show Preston Cottage as it was in the 1970’s when our family used to go there for our holidays.  The view on the top right means so much to me…We used to run through that gate to the bottom of the field where it was possible to make a bit of a dam and play in the pool of water which formed.  Preston cottage was extended to the side… When we stayed there it was just two bedrooms.  The water supply was the spring and the water came out brown a lot of the time!

We would get our eggs from Mr and Mrs Tucker, the farmers at Preston Farm.  They had lots of chickens and cats, along with cattle, and they were always very friendly and kind. Preston Farm now is listed as run by  D.g Pile.  So I take it it is still a working farm of some kind.
EX31 4NH Kentisbury

 

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design?

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design? If so, then take a look at my website jamartlondon.com, for a start.

My artwork is particularly suitable for themes of: faith, religion, philosophy, Christian, church, all faith traditions, inter-faith, spirituality, the subconscious, psychoanalytic themes, mindfulness, contemplative practices, healing, health, both physical and mental, trauma recovery, metaphysical and psychological focused writings, the devotional life, and many other subjects.

Indeed, pretty much any subject matter or theme which benefits from a more abstract graphic image; one which also conveys basic feelings and ideas in an open and experimental manner; would benefit from it’s clarity of communication being enhanced by one of my art images.

From the lyrical abstraction of some of abstract expressionist style textured paintings, to the geometric abstraction clear edged imagery, which I also produce, the value of non representational imagery in book cover design which is both colourful and interesting, and stimulates the eye with colour and striking composition, cannot be under estimated.

If you are looking for something particular, do contact me, because I only display a small amount on the internet and may even be able to create something specific to your needs, or be able to locate something from my extensive archives which meets your need.

DACS administrate my licensing agreements and organise the use of my art work images quickly and conveniently. They are very helpful and can guide you through the process if you are unfamiliar with it. I normally follow their guidelines with respect to the fees for licensing, as these are set in line with the industry standard.

DACS do offer a good reduction in fees for registered charities. Occasionally it may be possible for slightly reduced rates to be negotiated in other circumstances.

 

 

 

 

womaninachemiseweb

 

Woman in a Chemise by Picasso

 

Change for jamartlondon.com

It’s very annoying but I have just found out that because Adobe Flash is being discontinued and I built my jamartlondon website with a flash based editor, the only way I will be able to continue to edit it in the future will be with the ever increasingly out of date adobe flash add on I have on one of my computers. And when that computer dies, which it may well do soon, as its very old, then that will be that, for editing my website.

I can start to build one from scratch, but for the time being I need to put my energy into other things, so I will be tidying it up while I can, and then keeping it online, but static.  You will still be able to use the contact form but I think I will be using this blog and other ways of showing my recent projects, work and activities online rather than my website.  I will get around to making a new one in the next couple of years but it will need to become a useful port of call  but not a means of knowing what I am doing beyond 2019.  Never mind.

jenny meehan of jamartlondon

jenny meehan of jamartlondon

 

jenny meehan of jamartlondon

jenny meehan of jamartlondon

 

It’s very, very, far down the bottom of this page, but you can see some recent examples of my Instagram shares right at the end of this page.  To see the various widgets on this blog (when you are viewing it using your mobile) without needing to scroll down into the depths of eternity, just select the page under the MENU which starts Jenny Meehan (Jennifer Meehan) Artist – Author – Painter -Poet and, as that’s a SHORT page, you can see all kinds of handy widgets such as Google Translate and Instagram without wearing your finger out with excessive scrolling!

 

 

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I ran out of time in my last post to tell you more about a project I was pleased to be part of.  So better late than never!

Collect Connects’ Artwork for the Tate Modern

This was a Collect Connect project (Alban Low) with Harvey Wells, Kevin Acott and the team at
Queen Mary University of London

From the Collect Connect site:

“In 2016 we created our Relationship Map for Mental Health Awareness Week. It was a large scale artwork that charted people’s life connections using the London Tube map. After its success we’re back in 2019 with a new interactive map that will be exhibited at the Tate Modern from 11th-16th June. It will be part of the Ideas in Motion: borders, bodies, and the universe exhibition at the Tate Modern, Blavatnik Building, Level 5, Bankside, London SE1 9TG.
More info at https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/tate-exchange/workshop/ideas-motion-borders-bodies-and-universe”

https://collectconnect.blogspot.com/2019/05/emotion-at-tate-modern.html?fbclid=IwAR1jDo_JkBBElxSUvrJPaFjcIs8FpLoEd31M2BZIEy3JzBqsWOsG62uzyLU

 

Our artwork is eMotion: Emotional Transitions in Healthcare. Ill-health requires us to make transitions: to move emotionally, spiritually, socially, physically. We adjust from being ‘healthy’ to being ‘ill’, from ‘independence’ to ‘dependence’ and back again. The project highlights the joys and fear of impermanence, of the changes that occur every second, minute and hour of our lives. It embraces movement as normal, as part of the flow of life – something that should neither be resisted nor forced.

We’ve built a huge interactive floor map, in the style of a tube map, which has ‘end stations’ labelled with key points of ‘stasis’. The ‘station stops’ in between are open for people to explore how they navigate these transitions. We would like your help in creating a map so that visitors at the Tate can navigate a path along these routes of transition.”

quoted from the Collect Connect website

Connections on the interactive floor map reflected journeys between two poles;

Health – Illness

Dependence – Independence

Home – Hospital

Life – Death

Young – Old

Hope – Fear

Certainty – Uncertainty

Me – You

Doctor – Patient

There were three blank “stops” for each line.  Artists, including myself, made our contributions concept wise and these were made into options for people to arrange so they could connect the concepts in the way they felt meaningful. (For example: what does it feel like to be in the middle between Hope to Fear, or closer to Hope, or closer to Fear. You could write something like: Hope – Last Minute Corner – First Game of Season – One Nil Up – Fear.)

Some of my ideas were used and it was lovely to contribute.

 

Here were my submissions:

Life – Death

Grateful Reception – Intimate Connection – Anxious Separation

and

Me – You

Expecting – Meeting – Expecting

 

Doctor – Patient

Controlling – Enquiring – Seeking

 

Hope – Fear

Holding Wonder Lightly – Trying to Grasp All – Losing Sense of Self

 

Dependence – Independence

Vulnerability and Need – Gathering Resources – Freedom to Be

 

Certainty – Uncertainty

Really? – Faith – Trust

 

Young – Old

Tender in Expectations – Placid Pivotal Places – Facing the Realities

 

Home – Hospital

Where it Starts – Where it Happens –  Where it Ends

 

Health – Illness

Moving and Being – Maintaining Momentum – Slipping Down Stagnantly

 

 

eMotion: Emotional Transitions in Healthcare
Ill-health requires us to make transitions: to move emotionally, spiritually, socially, physically. We adjust from being ‘healthy’ to being ‘ill’, from ‘independence’ to ‘dependence’ and back again. Track your personal route from illness to wellbeing on an interactive map of the healthcare system.

Tate Modern also have this, which looks interesting.  As someone with osteoarthritis….(and a nice new total knee replacement to go with it!) impaired mobility has been part of my own experience.  Thankfully at present, I am fully mobile, but I did have a two year period when that was not the case.

Creating without Constraint: Arthritis and Art
Experience this interactive workshop exploring the relationship between impaired mobility and artistic expression. Our researchers will guide you in a ‘journey’ inside the joints with activities simulating the restriction of movement. The display will include the work of Renoir and Pickering, two artists who lived with arthritis, to explore how art can overcome disability. Also, emerging painter Rebecca Ivatts will give a talk about her collaboration with Pickering.”

I looked around and chatted, having excellent conversations and learning lots, as well as sharing my own perspectives and experience of osteoarthritis.  I’m particularly interested in chronic pain management, as this is something I studied a fair bit over the two years before my knee replacement surgery out of necessity.  I don’t have pain in my knee anymore, but my elbows, wrists and hands have decided to sometimes advertise themselves in the pain department. I’m getting pretty experienced at moving my mind in other directions now!

 

Big and Small Names at the Tate Modern

The novel thing is, I can now say my name has been present at the Tate Modern!  Yes, printed, and there for all to see.  Only because of a small contribution, but there all the same.  And names mean a lot to us, so just the little printed presence of my name at the Tate Modern can bring me at least a little smile!

People like their names in places…Yes they do. It’s interesting that the now Blavatnik extension/building at Tate Modern was named the “Switch House” when it was opened in June 2016. I do prefer the original name. It holds some relevance to the history of the building which I think is always a good thing.  The now Blavatnik Building was originally named the Switch House to reflect the previous use of the site for a power station.  It’s very interesting that you can see two circular terrace areas when you look downwards.  You can see the Oil Tank Wall, which is an interesting element of design.  The Oil Tank Wall encloses two large circular terraces, to the south and east of the building right in front of the new gallery entrance and café. The Oil Tank wall is an above-grade extrusion of the existing below ground Oil Tanks.  I love it.  It’s a strong feature which heightens your awareness of the past.  I think the building was always meant to strongly echo its past as well as its future…because it has an interesting history.

Tate Modern’s The Turbine Hall is housed in the former Bankside Power Station, designed originally by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (He was the architect of Battersea Power Station too!). It was built between 1947 and 1963. Before it was developed the steel framed brick clad building with it’s 99m chimney was divided into three main areas: the Turbine Hall, the Boiler House to the north, and the switch house to the south.

So you see, bearing in mind the Turbine Hall, the Boiler House and the Switch House…yes, a nice trio.  It is a bit sad that the Switch House was renamed.  I guess when someone donates a lot of money, they like to have their name included.  And it’s kind of understandable.  Because I got a tiny bit of a kick out of my little name being in the Tate Modern, so I am sure the same kind of kick, but a little bit larger, applies!  So the name was changed, a year after the opening, and reflected Blavatnik’s wishes. Bearing in mind the size of the donation, I think it was probably diplomatic to reflect Blavatnik’s wishes.  Nicholas Serota, who stepped down as the Tate director at the end of May 2017 said he was “delighted the new building now bears his name”. Blavatnik made the Tate pledge in 2011 and the Blavatnik Family Foundation’s donation made up a substantial amount of the £260m needed to complete it.

So I do wonder if the name “Switch House” was meant to be it’s proper name… I’m sure it was… It would be in accordance with the other buildings.  Yet Len Blavatnik, (an industrialist born in Ukraine) came up with the cash in 2017 when Tate Modern found that the new Switch House extension had left it with a £30m funding shortfall. So I shouldn’t be surprised that a year after it opened, the Switch House was renamed the Blavatnik Building.  And I’m quite happy with my own name in very small print on an super contribution to the “Ideas in Motion: borders, bodies, and the universe exhibition”.

https://www.ft.com/content/449ad16e-20dd-11e6-aa98-db1e01fabc0c

USSR-born billionaire made one of largest donations in Tate’s history to help fund building temporarily named Switch House

What Style is that Painting?

This was one of the questions I was asked at this year’s Kingston Artists’ Open Studios.

The terms I tend to use for describing my main thrust in painting are bouncing within the realms of the following terms: Lyrical abstraction, abstraction lyrique, tachism, tachisme, action painting, abstract expressionism, art informal, informalism.  But these are terms which relate to particular movements in the past, and serve as a way of describing and communicating what to expect with my own painting, and not anything more than that.  And it is the case that within my own realm of art working, I move between several styles…  This is part of the process of development.  I think I have written about this in a previous post.  It is a bad thing to narrow down artistic creation in order to adhere or fit into a style.  If it happens it will happen naturally, and evolve that way. It will grow and develop, playing and toying with different styles and approaches en route!

It is the case, that when using paint, things now are tending to fall within the bounds of my approach, which is process led and focused on formal elements and experimenting with materials. What comes through is a materialisation, a becoming, of my self.  Which references my life experience and emotional and spiritual journey.  Mostly I like to let things happen, rather than plan.  But there is a lot of unconscious planning which happens I think.  There is a lot of emerging!!!

Historical terms and descriptions of styles are good for searching for the kind of paintings you like, and there are plenty of movements which it is helpful for the keen collector of art to educate themselves in.  My own preoccupation is with the formal elements of the painting, and a process led approach.  My preferred terminology for my own work is that of British romantic, poetic, lyrical, abstract and expressionistic painting.  I like the romantic, because of the way it conveys both individuality and intensity of emotion and the importance of these.  I loved my studies of the Romantic poets when at University, and also of the paintings of Turner, which were studies as part of a couple of painting courses at West Dean College given by John T Freeman, (who I credit, among others, with role of welcoming me into the realms of painting as a way of life/vocational activity!)

Yet “style” can be a trap.  I believe a consistency can be found which comes from the person themselves. Styles may change but the interactions between mediums and styles are what keep an artist’s work dynamic.  I don’t need to stick to one style… It’s  more a matter of honing my focus and being reflective and innovative. Sometimes that makes an artist’s work rather an eclectic mix.  Diverse at times. That’s good, not bad.  Don’t worry about how your work would look on a supermarket shelf.  Don’t worry about if you are consistent enough.  Do your work for your self, unless you particularly want to do it for other people.  That’s fine too.  But exploration, discovery, experimentation, and going beyond what you can see or anticipate or plan…. These keep things exciting imo.

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design?

Do you need exciting, engaging, images for a book cover design? If so, then take a look at my website jamartlondon.com, for a start.

My artwork is particularly suitable for themes of: faith, religion, philosophy, Christian, church, all faith traditions, inter-faith, spirituality, the subconscious, psychoanalytic themes, mindfulness, contemplative practices, healing, health, both physical and mental, trauma recovery, metaphysical and psychological focused writings, the devotional life, and many other subjects.

Indeed, pretty much any subject matter or theme which benefits from a more abstract graphic image; one which also conveys basic feelings and ideas in an open and experimental manner; would benefit from it’s clarity of communication being enhanced by one of my art images.

From the lyrical abstraction of some of abstract expressionist style textured paintings, to the geometric abstraction clear edged imagery, which I also produce, the value of non representational imagery in book cover design which is both colourful and interesting, and stimulates the eye with colour and striking composition, cannot be under estimated.

If you are looking for something particular, do contact me, because I only display a small amount on the internet and may even be able to create something specific to your needs, or be able to locate something from my extensive archives which meets your need.

DACS administrate my licensing agreements and organise the use of my art work images quickly and conveniently. They are very helpful and can guide you through the process if you are unfamiliar with it. I normally follow their guidelines with respect to the fees for licensing, as these are set in line with the industry standard.

DACS do offer a good reduction in fees for registered charities. Occasionally it may be possible for slightly reduced rates to be negotiated in other circumstances.

To find out more about how you can arrange to use my imagery, see here:

https://www.dacs.org.uk/licensing-works/frequently-asked-questions#FAQ122

 

 

Artist’s Statement – Jenny Meehan

Artist Statements are funny things…Mine does change over time and circumstances.  Which is in accordance with my priorities and focus at the time of writing. This is no bad thing.  Often it is very helpful as the need to critically assess and evaluate my vision and objectives, as well as look back into the past and reflect on how things are evolving is a useful practice which needing to write an artist statement helps.  Here is an example of an early artist statement I wrote many years back:

I have been creating two and three dimensional art since 2005. Art is about exploration. I view mine as a natural and evolving process which is primarily to do with the emotions and spirit, though I do enjoy playing with concepts too. My Christian faith, relationships, and artistic contemplation and production are the main driving forces in my life.

Trees and plants, metal objects, the human figure, and many different types of man- made constructions, are subject matter I favour. I like to explore different styles of expression using a range of media; primarily paint, photography, poetry, metal and paper. The brokenness of human experience fascinates me, but also the potential for growth and renewal. My work has a positive outlook, as I think that it is often through suffering, touched by God’s grace, that the beauty of the human soul is revealed. The idea of strength combined with vulnerability is particularly attractive to me.

My art is a sacramental practice, and the mystery of faith and its reality beyond our human rational mindset is something which interests me. I also see my work as an articulation of fragmentary experience; it’s how I make sense of the world. Alongside my general fine art practice I am interested in liturgical art using a variety of media. Since 2008 I have put most of my creative energies into developing my skills with paint, which I love. Intensely.”

I quite like this one…It gives a gentle overview, which includes a lot about spirituality and faith and the importance inspiration wise of my religious tradition.  It’s not very focused on any particular current project of the time…I wanted to keep it very broad and tried to cover a large area with it.  Maybe a little too much of an overview I think, looking at it now.  However, the purpose is important, and it was written for my website at the time, so in that sense I think it was a pretty well fitting piece of writing.

 

Lovely West Dean College and West Dean Gardens!

west dean gardens west dean, drawing by jenny meehan

Drawing done in West Dean Gardens

Drawing by Jenny Meehan in West Dean Gardens Sussex.

Another one….

drawing by jenny meehan in West Dean Gardens Sussex

Another one!

I will post some photos at some point.

This year I was experimenting with Collagraphs.   Very nice medium… Right up my street.  I have been working with black a fair bit in my studio tent recently…. experimenting, so the rich black ink was a welcome sight and the textures are always so dynamic in terms of the marks they can make.  So it was a delight.  Take a look on my instagram to see some of what I produced, though as is always, I have taken home a lot of work to do which will keep me on track in that area for some time.  I’m not interested in working large or producing editions…Small unique prints are more interesting and why produce more of the same?

https://www.instagram.com/jamartlondon_jennymeehan/

 

Shape Open 2019

Very please to be taking part in this year’s Shape Open Exhibition.  It’s great my two years of increasing physical disability before a much needed knee replacement proved so fruitful in unexpected ways.  Not easy, but to take part in the Shape Open 2019 with my work “What Does this Symbol Say?” feels very appropriate, because the creation of my artwork is intimately connected with my own experience of disability.

https://www.shapearts.org.uk/Blog/shape-open-2019-artists-announced

Inclusive International Symbol of Access Design by Jenny Meehan

Here is the text I submitted:

“My re-design of the International Symbol of
Access is inspired by my own need to rethink
what disability is due to a period of restricted
mobility prior to knee replacement surgery.
Finding myself in need of using an accessible
toilet, for example, helped me to realise how
inappropriate the existing symbol was.
I’d like people viewing the work to add their
thoughts as to what it expresses to them. If the
ISA was to change, this could have a powerful
impact in many societies and open up
dialogue and awareness in a very beneficial
way.
Opportunities to rethink are intimately linked
with with conversation about disability, and art
is a key player in helping peoples awareness
to increase through engaging with new ways
of seeing and experiencing things. In my
view, the focus for progression in all things
needs to encompass a strong sense of moving
forwards and upwards, and this new icon has this. ”

 

The reason why I think my design is a good option:

It’s got the right angle of what was the seat of the wheelchair and also the round circle which was the wheel.  It has the three main elements of the existing wheelchair symbol but rearranged and reinterpreted. Open arms convey welcome and reception of.

My symbol has also the following strengths:

It retains the circle, helping recognition, as society adjusts from the old to the new
It works in both static and mobile situations (ie previous crit of the dynamic wheelchair version)
It suggests refuge (a circle as something which encompasses and surrounds in a protective way)
It suggests entering into…. key for accessibility…the pointed end of the v shape enters into the inside of the circle
It suggests freedom…. The arms (v shape) are outstretched and open. This is freedom for the disabled person
the feeling of this icon is buoyant and expansive…
the small circle and upturned V shape resemble the top half of a person’s body, meaning it still contains the two key elements from the old symbol, a circle and a human body, just in a slightly more open and abstract way.
The whole icon has a sense of outwards and upwards… things are moving forwards.
The whole icon is more inclusive, and shows inclusion visually too… ie the person goes into and comes out of the circle. Helpful when used to signify that facilities are designed around the person.

Facilities are designed around the person, and the symbol is designed with the person, not the wheelchair, being central which is more appropriate.

Unfortunately the process for getting the International Access Symbol changed is probably near impossible, as there are so many bodies and countries and boards which it would need to go through.  However, this hasn’t stopped me creating this. It’s making it’s debut into the world in the perfect place.

I designed my inclusive international access symbol in February this year.  I later used it to create another different design with a specific emphasis on mental health; “State of the Art”.  State of the Art is an emblem with specific personal links to my own psychological and emotional trauma recovery, while “What Does this Symbol Say?” is a symbol design which relates to my experiences of physical disability, though of course the two are related!

I’m looking forward to the private view!  Info here  (from Shape website):

 

Join us for the Private View of the 2019 Shape Open on Thursday 5th September from 6.30 – 8.30pm.

This event will be BSL interpreted.

The exhibition will be available at Nunnery Gallery until 19th September.

The Shape Open 2019 exhibition explores the theme ‘In Circles’ in the context of disability. Disabled and non-disabled artists were invited to submit work for Shape Arts’ seventh annual Open exhibition that ignites debate and discussion on disability from a wide range of viewpoints.

This year’s exhibition theme ‘In Circles’ questions whether progress for disabled artists is being and can be made within the arts, if our work is counterproductive and a circular argument, or if we can shift institutional thinking.

The exhibition showcases work across a wide range of art forms from artists around the world.

The 2019 Shape Open exhibiting artists are:

Tony Allen, Richard Amm, Faith Bebbington, Coreen Bernard, Lizz Brady, Claire Callow, Sam Castell-Ward, Annie Ho Cooper, Daisy Cowley, Nikki Davidson-Bowman, Catriona Faulkner, Alice Rose Floyd, Steven Fraser, CL Gamble, Laura Graham, Michael Gurhy, Steven Hardy, Jack Haslam, Liam Hassan-Beserekumo, Tzipporah Johnston, Elora Kadir, Nihan Karim, Glynis Lamond, Carrie Mason, Campbell Mcconnell, Andrew McPhail, Jenny Meehan, Charlie J. Meyers, Bella Milroy, Aidan Moesby, Steve Musk, Elfrida Osbert, Alice Partington, Beau Rouse, Amna Sharif, Anne Smith, Mark Tamer, Andrea Vicentini, Aminder Virdee, Ophir Yaron, and Chan Chung Yuen.

A winning artist, selected by a small panel including Shape Open Patron, Yinka Shonibare MBE (RA), will be awarded £1,000 at the Private View; a second artist will receive the People’s Choice Award of £250, as voted for by visitors of the exhibition throughout its duration. The People’s Choice Award is kindly supported by Crucial Colour Ltd, part of L&S Printing Co Ltd in Worthing, West Sussex.

Full details can be found here: https://www.shapearts.org.uk/Event/shape-open-2019

Travel Information
Opening hours: Tues-Sun, 10am to 5pm
Address: Nunnery Gallery, 181 Bow Road, London, E3 2SJ
Nearest station(s): Bow Road (District and Hammersmith and City lines) is a 6-minute walk away, and Bow Church (DLR) is a 3-minute walk away.
Bus: 205, 25, 425, A8, D8, 108, 276, 488 and 8 all service the surrounding area.”

 

Last, but not Least… North Pennines AONB Environmental Conservation Organization Subterraneous Exhibition at Bowlees Visitor Centre

I have my work on show at Bowlees Visitor Centre.  The location of the centre is within the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty/AONB and UNESCO Global Geopark.  It looks like a lovely area.  I cannot visit the exhibition but hopefully they will publish online a lot about it soon.

There’s an article here:

https://www.teesdalemercury.co.uk/art-and-leisure/exhibition-celebrates-dales-secret-world-of-bugs

I am very pleased to have my art work in this art exhibition!

My “Ant Parade” surface pattern design is something I was very pleased with and I like my work to be seen and enjoyed by others as much as possible.

Text from the above:

 

“More than 50 creations are on display in the Subterraneous exhibition at Bowlees Visitor Centre which continues to September 29 as part of the North Pennines AONB Partnership’s Cold-blooded and Spineless project.

Funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, the project raises awareness of invertebrates and highlights their importance to our environment and our lives.

Subterraneous will uncover the world of invertebrates, largely hidden from view.

The work has involved artists from the North Pennines and further afield.

Furry creatures will invade the exhibition space at Bowlees Visitor Centre and a variety of sculptures, sound and images will emphasise the importance of invertebrate conservation.

Works include ancient fossils in sandstone, vibrant insects made from recycled silk ties and even a sculpture that functions as a soil ecosystem.

There will also be an “infestation chair”, covered in a screen-printed design, celebrating the beauty and complexity of insect life.”

 

I like the sound of that chair!

 

North Pennines AONB, Environmental Conservation Organization, Subterraneous Exhibition at Bowlees Visitor Centreant parade by jenny meehan , surface pattern design, bugs, insects, ants,

ant parade by jenny meehan ©jenny meehan North Pennines AONB Environmental Conservation Organization Subterraneous Exhibition at Bowlees Visitor Centre

 

I am pleased to be supporting the North Pennines AONB Partnership’s Cold-blooded and Spineless project by exhibiting my work in the  Subterraneous exhibition.

Subterraneous is part of an AONB Partnership project.

Cold-blooded and Spineless is funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Find out more here:

  • @HeritageFundNOR

And here:

Twitter @NorthPennAONB  @northpennwild

Facebook @NorthPenninesAONB   

Instagram @northpenninesaonb

My text on Ant Parade

Ant Parade 2019

This small square piece of fabric is an example of one strand of my creative practice which involves experimentation with geometric shapes and patterns. The original form of the ants has been obscured and distorted through my visual interpretation, which I developed in order to emphasise the way ants work together.

Ants live and work together in highly organised societies called colonies. In fact, most ant colonies are so united toward the common purposes of survival, growth, and reproduction that they behave like a single organism, or a “superorganism.”

Pattern is an underlying structure that organises surfaces or structures in a consistent, regular manner. Pattern can be described as a repeating unit of shape or form, but it can also be thought of as the “skeleton” that organises the parts of a composition.

So these little invertebrates, do share a hidden, less obvious skeleton, of sorts. It’s the case in life that often the structures which hold the body together are not obvious at all, and sometimes completely invisible.

Pattern exists in nature as well as in designed objects; it is interesting to look at the parallels between art and nature, also appreciating the less obvious ones. Some formations are obvious and some are not.

An army of ants may well consist of creatures classified as invertebrate, but it’s certainly not spineless! A spinal column gives the body form and function. There’s a hidden spine in this ant parade, which I have interpreted visually in an abstract manner.

 

 

About Jenny Meehan British Contemporary Fine Artist and Designer

Jenny Meehan jamartlondon.com

I am a painter-poet/visual artist, contemplative/poet/writer, art educator, teacher and spiritual mentor (Progressive Christian faith centred) based in East Surrey/South West London, UK.

Support my art working by buying products of my design on Redbubble.com and also of course, original fine paintings, available direct from me!
Geometric and lyrical abstraction from London/Surrey based female British Contemporary Artist.

I’m interested in spirituality (particularly Christ centred spirituality), creativity, emotional and psychological well-being, trauma recovery, and mindfulness.

I exhibit mainly in the UK, and am a member of Kingston Artists’ Open Studios (KAOS).

I have trained both with SPIDIR and through a variety of other training bodies as a spiritual guide/mentor.
I am a trained teacher (PGCE) and hold occasional small groups in developing painting and drawing skills, as well as offering occasional individual tuition.

Contact me via the contact form on my website http://www.jamartlondon.com

If you are less interested in original fine art and paintings, but would like to have something with my imagery on it, then go to:
https://www.redbubble.com/people/JennyMeehan/portfolio

and

https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/portfolio

Where you can buy selected art and design.
For the more geometric abstract strand of my art and design:
https://www.redbubble.com/people/JennyMeehan/portfolio has more, and for lyrical abstraction painting-prints I will be putting work up on the other redbubble profile:
https://www.redbubble.com/people/jennyjimjams/portfolio

I gain a small royalty percentage which helps me towards the cost of materials and exhibiting my work. Every little helps.

You can contact me via the contact form on my website jamartlondon.com

Some of my original paintings are available for purchase when no longer required for exhibition, and I am happy to license images of my work via the Designers and Artists Copyright Society (DACS).

All content is © Jenny Meehan.
Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts of writing and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jenny Meehan with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Images may not be used without permission.

Please note that all images of my artwork are subject to copyright law: All rights reserved. In the first instance, contact me, and I will refer, as/if appropriate.

If you are looking for artwork, particularly abstract, colourist, expressionistic lyrical abstraction type painting images suitable for book covers etc, then do contact me as I might have something to suit which will be quick and easy to license via DACS

www.jamartlondon.com

 

https://www.instagram.com/jamartlondon_jennymeehan/

 

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